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15,000 Canadians are HIV positive and don't know it. Injection drug use now number one risk factor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192785
Source
HIV Prev Plus. 1999;1(1):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999

'About time!' Insights from Research with Pride: a community-student collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131754
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Kira A Abelsohn
Jessica M Ferne
Kyle A Scanlon
Broden L Giambrone
Sivan B Bomze
Author Affiliation
The 519 Church Street Community Centre, Toronto, Canada. kira.abelsohn@gmail.com
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Ontario
Students
Universities
Abstract
Research with Pride (RwP) was a community-student collaborative initiative to promote and build capacity for community-based research exploring health and wellness in lesbian, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) communities. The event took place at University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health (DLSPH) in September 2009, and engaged over 100 students, community members and academic researchers in a full day of discussion, learning and networking. RwP was initiated by a group of graduate students in Health Promotion who identified a gap in resources addressing LGBTQ health, facilitating their further learning and work in this area. By engaging in a partnership with a community service organization serving LGBTQ communities in downtown Toronto, RwP emerges as a key example of the role of community-student partnerships in the pursuit of LGBTQ health promotion. This paper will describe the nature of this partnership, outline its strengths and challenges and emphasize the integral role of community-student partnerships in health promotion initiatives.
PubMed ID
21880613 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and sexual experience prior to disclosure to health care providers among men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada: implications for targeted vaccination programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122620
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2012
Author
Claudia Rank
Mark Gilbert
Gina Ogilvie
Gayatri C Jayaraman
Rick Marchand
Terry Trussler
Robert S Hogg
Reka Gustafson
Tom Wong
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Date
Aug-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Condylomata Acuminata - prevention & control
Disclosure
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Men who have sex with men (MSM) may benefit from human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine due to increased risk for HPV infection and related disease. We assessed HPV vaccine acceptability and sexual experience prior to disclosure to Health Care Providers (HCP) to understand implications of targeted vaccination strategies for MSM.
From July 2008 to February 2009, 1169 MSM aged =19 years were recruited at community venues in Vancouver. We assessed key variables from a self-administered questionnaire and independent predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability using multivariate logistic regression.
Of 1041 respondents, 697 (67.0%) were willing to receive HPV vaccine and 71.3% had heard of HPV. Significant multivariate predictors of higher vaccine acceptability were (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]): previous diagnosis of genital warts (1.7 [1.1, 2.6]), disclosure of sexual behavior to HCP (1.6 [1.1, 2.3]), annual income at least $20,000 (1.5 [1.1, 2.1]), previous hepatitis A or B vaccination (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]), and no recent recreational drug use (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]). Most MSM (78.7%) had disclosed sexual behavior to HCP and median time from first sexual contact with males to disclosure was 6.0 years (IQR 2-14 years); for men =26 years these were 72.0% and 3.0 years (IQR 1-8 years) respectively.
Willingness to receive HPV vaccine was substantial among MSM in Vancouver; however, acceptability varied by demographics, risk, and health history. HPV vaccine programs delivered by HCP would offer limited benefit given the duration of time from sexual debut to disclosure to HCP.
PubMed ID
22796376 View in PubMed
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Accounts of HIV seroconversion among substance-using gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148150
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jeffrey P Aguinaldo
Ted Myers
Karen Ryder
Dennis J Haubrich
Liviana Calzavara
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jaguinaldo@wlu.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality
Case-Control Studies
HIV Seropositivity - psychology - transmission
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
Statistical associations between substance use and seroconversion among gay and bisexual men abound. However, these associations often ignore men's own interpretations of their seroconversion. Using in-depth interviews with gay and bisexual men who reported using drugs or alcohol at the time of their seroconversion, we identify how these men explain the events that led to HIV transmission. Whereas a small minority of respondents reported substance use to explain their seroconversion, the majority reported three competing explanations. These participants claimed that they lacked sufficient knowledge about the behavioral risks that led to their seroconversion; that their decision to engage in unsafe sex was because of negative personal affect; and that they "trusted the wrong person." We link these findings to prevention and suggest that gay and bisexual men who use substances for recreational purposes will benefit from prevention efforts designed to address issues of gay and bisexual men rather than substance-using men.
PubMed ID
19805802 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jan 9;157(2):198-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1995
Author
H. Zachariae
Author Affiliation
Dermato-venerologisk afdeling, Marselisborg Hospital, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jan 9;157(2):198-201
Date
Jan-9-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hemophilia A - therapy
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Sexual Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
7831734 View in PubMed
Less detail

AIDS in Latin America: assessing the current status of the epidemic and the ongoing response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155971
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Aug;37(4):729-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Francisco I Bastos
Carlos Cáceres
Jane Galvão
Maria Amélia Veras
Euclides Ayres Castilho
Author Affiliation
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Francisco.inacio.bastos@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Aug;37(4):729-37
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - epidemiology
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Incidence
Latin America - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Prostitution
Risk factors
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
This article provides a summary of the current status of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Latin America, as well as an outline of the diverse responses to it.
A search of international databases (Pubmed and ISI-Web of Science), regional databases (Scielo and Lilacs), regional and national documents and UNAIDS reports. Data are presented according to subregion.
In Mexico HIV remains concentrated among urban men who have sex with men (MSM), and has been growing among injecting drug users (IDU) and in rural areas in relation to migration. An increasing proportion of women among those affected is observed in all countries in Central America, the most affected region, as well as increasing the impact on other vulnerable groups, such as indigenous populations. The Andean Countries have urban epidemics concentrated among MSM. In Peru, non-traditional vulnerable populations were identified. In the Southern Cone heterosexual transmission became more relevant, probably in connection with IDU epidemics and is increasingly affecting lower income groups. Incidence rates have been declining since 2002 in Brazil, the first country to guarantee free, universal access to antiretrovirals, where one-third of drug-naïve patients are still initiating treatment at an advanced stage. Generally, access to treatment has improved as a result of support from the Global Fund and other initiatives, but there are concerns regarding coverage, equity and sustainability.
HIV is still concentrated among MSM in Latin America. Non-traditional vulnerable groups such as migrants and lower income populations, usually considered part of the general population, deserve attention. Programmes confronting sexual exclusion are still needed. Access to treatment has improved over time, but inequalities persist.
PubMed ID
18653508 View in PubMed
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AIDS optimism, condom fatigue, or self-esteem? Explaining unsafe sex among gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173573
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Barry D Adam
Winston Husbands
James Murray
John Maxwell
Author Affiliation
University of Windsor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. adam@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - psychology - transmission
Adult
Bisexuality - psychology
Condoms - utilization
Depression - psychology
Erectile Dysfunction - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Homosexuality, Male - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interview, Psychological
Intuition
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Self Concept
Sexual Partners - psychology
Truth Disclosure
Unsafe Sex - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines leading explanations for unsafe sex in light of in-depth interviews with 102 high-risk gay and bisexual men in Toronto to see how well they engage with the social circumstances and reasoning processes of men in their sexual relationships. We argue that there is an inadequate fit between some of the leading explanations and the discursive accounts provided by high risk men themselves. Their accounts focus on unsafe sex occurring as a resolution to condom and erectile difficulties, through momentary lapses and trade offs, out of personal turmoil and depression, and as a byproduct of strategies of disclosure and intuiting safety. This study examines, in particular the circumstances and rationales associated with men who identify their practices as "barebacking." We conclude with recommendations for communicating prevention messages to those most at risk based on the self-understandings of gay and bisexual men who most frequently practice unprotected sex.
PubMed ID
19817037 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol Use and Associated Sexual and Substance Use Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Moscow, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279026
Source
AIDS Behav. 2016 Mar;20(3):523-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
A L Wirtz
C E Zelaya
C. Latkin
R. Stall
A. Peryshkina
N. Galai
V. Mogilniy
P. Dzhigun
I. Kostetskaya
C. Beyrer
Source
AIDS Behav. 2016 Mar;20(3):523-36
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Homosexuality, Male - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Russia
Sexual Behavior - drug effects - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Unsafe Sex - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol use is a public health problem in the Russian Federation. This study explored relationships between alcohol use and behavioral risks for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Moscow, Russia. Alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) scores for 1367 MSM participating in a cross-sectional survey and HIV testing were categorized to: "abstinence/low use", "hazardous use", "harmful use/dependency". Multiple logistic regression models compared dependent variables for sexual and drug use behaviors across alcohol use strata. Hazardous and harmful/dependent alcohol use were significantly associated with high-risk sexual behaviors and drug use. Harmful use/dependency was associated with an increased odds of having more than five male sex partners (last 12 months; adjusted odds ratios-AOR 1.69; 95 % CI 1.25-2.27), inconsistent condom use during anal intercourse (AOR 2.19; 95 % CI 1.61-2.96) and, among those using recreational drugs, injection drug use (last month; AOR 4.38: 95 % CI 1.13-17.07) compared to abstinent/low-level users. Harmful/dependent use was marginally associated with HIV infection (AOR 1.48; 95 % CI 0.97-2.25). HIV prevention efforts for MSM in Moscow may benefit from addressing problem alcohol use to mitigate high-risk behaviors.
Notes
Cites: AIDS Behav. 2013 Mar;17(3):1016-2422987210
Cites: Cult Health Sex. 2013;15(4):480-9323464743
Cites: AIDS Care. 2014;26(3):387-9523875610
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Apr 26;383(9927):1465-7324486187
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PubMed ID
25893659 View in PubMed
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The ambiguity of lesbian and gay marriages: change and continuity in the symbolic order.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33843
Source
J Homosex. 1998;35(3-4):207-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Halvorsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dragvoll, Norway. runeh@sv.ntnu.no
Source
J Homosex. 1998;35(3-4):207-31
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family
Female
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male - psychology
Humans
Male
Marriage - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Politics
Symbolism
Abstract
The article discusses the Registered Partnership Act, passed in Norway in 1993, which has given gay and lesbian couples a right to register their relationship and to obtain many of the legal rights that heterosexual couples have. The article argues that the introduction of the Act is a product of, among others, cohabitation having become more legitimate as a life-form also among heterosexuals. The practical consequences of the Act have been modest, with relatively few couples having registered their relationship. The article suggests that the symbolic rather than the practical aspects of the Act have been important, and even then, the symbolic effect of the Act is equivocal. The new formal rights of gays and lesbians are of decreasing social and symbolic value, as new boundaries for legitimate life-forms are being demarcated elsewhere: While legislation on marriage concedes that personal relationships are a private matter, the right to have and to foster children is regarded as an issue where society at large should have a say. This view is also reflected in the restrictions that the Registered Partnership Act has placed on gay and lesbian couples in having children of their own.
PubMed ID
9638564 View in PubMed
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Ambivalent spaces--the emergence of a new gay male norm situated between notions of the commercial and the political in the Swedish gay press, 1969-1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269458
Source
J Homosex. 2015;62(6):763-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hanna Bertilsdotter Rosqvist
Klara Arnberg
Source
J Homosex. 2015;62(6):763-81
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce
Culture
History, 20th Century
Homosexuality, Male - history - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Newspapers as Topic - history - statistics & numerical data
Politics
Sweden
Abstract
Within sexual geographies, sexual struggles over urban public spaces are frequently explored. Less common is research on sexual struggles within sexually shared spaces and gay spaces. The aim of the article is to examine discursive struggles of meanings of gay male identity enacted in discussions of commodification/capitalism, disclosure, and space in Swedish gay press during 1969-1986. We trace the ambivalent feelings or the emergence of a new gay male norm situated between commercialism and non-commercialism within the Swedish gay press back to the 1970s. In the article we show how a monosexualization process was taking place in both the Swedish gay press as well as within sexual spaces. We explore rhetorical struggles between two competing discursive meanings of (ideal homonormative) male homosexuality, gay culture, and space: one wider (inclusive) and one narrower (exclusive).
PubMed ID
25532031 View in PubMed
Less detail

414 records – page 1 of 42.