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808 records – page 1 of 81.

[2 women--2 parents. Interview by Lisbet Harstad.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59428
Source
Jordmorbladet. 1994;(5):18-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

15,000 Canadians are HIV positive and don't know it. Injection drug use now number one risk factor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192785
Source
HIV Prev Plus. 1999;1(1):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999

'About time!' Insights from Research with Pride: a community-student collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131754
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Kira A Abelsohn
Jessica M Ferne
Kyle A Scanlon
Broden L Giambrone
Sivan B Bomze
Author Affiliation
The 519 Church Street Community Centre, Toronto, Canada. kira.abelsohn@gmail.com
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Ontario
Students
Universities
Abstract
Research with Pride (RwP) was a community-student collaborative initiative to promote and build capacity for community-based research exploring health and wellness in lesbian, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) communities. The event took place at University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health (DLSPH) in September 2009, and engaged over 100 students, community members and academic researchers in a full day of discussion, learning and networking. RwP was initiated by a group of graduate students in Health Promotion who identified a gap in resources addressing LGBTQ health, facilitating their further learning and work in this area. By engaging in a partnership with a community service organization serving LGBTQ communities in downtown Toronto, RwP emerges as a key example of the role of community-student partnerships in the pursuit of LGBTQ health promotion. This paper will describe the nature of this partnership, outline its strengths and challenges and emphasize the integral role of community-student partnerships in health promotion initiatives.
PubMed ID
21880613 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and sexual experience prior to disclosure to health care providers among men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada: implications for targeted vaccination programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122620
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2012
Author
Claudia Rank
Mark Gilbert
Gina Ogilvie
Gayatri C Jayaraman
Rick Marchand
Terry Trussler
Robert S Hogg
Reka Gustafson
Tom Wong
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Date
Aug-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Condylomata Acuminata - prevention & control
Disclosure
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Men who have sex with men (MSM) may benefit from human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine due to increased risk for HPV infection and related disease. We assessed HPV vaccine acceptability and sexual experience prior to disclosure to Health Care Providers (HCP) to understand implications of targeted vaccination strategies for MSM.
From July 2008 to February 2009, 1169 MSM aged =19 years were recruited at community venues in Vancouver. We assessed key variables from a self-administered questionnaire and independent predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability using multivariate logistic regression.
Of 1041 respondents, 697 (67.0%) were willing to receive HPV vaccine and 71.3% had heard of HPV. Significant multivariate predictors of higher vaccine acceptability were (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]): previous diagnosis of genital warts (1.7 [1.1, 2.6]), disclosure of sexual behavior to HCP (1.6 [1.1, 2.3]), annual income at least $20,000 (1.5 [1.1, 2.1]), previous hepatitis A or B vaccination (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]), and no recent recreational drug use (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]). Most MSM (78.7%) had disclosed sexual behavior to HCP and median time from first sexual contact with males to disclosure was 6.0 years (IQR 2-14 years); for men =26 years these were 72.0% and 3.0 years (IQR 1-8 years) respectively.
Willingness to receive HPV vaccine was substantial among MSM in Vancouver; however, acceptability varied by demographics, risk, and health history. HPV vaccine programs delivered by HCP would offer limited benefit given the duration of time from sexual debut to disclosure to HCP.
PubMed ID
22796376 View in PubMed
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Accepting the gay person: rental accommodation in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204598
Source
J Homosex. 1998;36(2):31-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
S. Page
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Ontario.
Source
J Homosex. 1998;36(2):31-9
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Homosexuality
Housing
Humans
Male
Prejudice
United States
Abstract
Effects of the "homosexual" label in obtaining community accommodation were examined, in a sample of 180 individuals advertising rooms or flats for rent in two Canadian cities, Windsor and London, Ontario, and in Detroit, Michigan. Telephone calls, for half the sample, made simple enquiries as to availability; for the other half, similar enquiries were made by an individual who was ostensibly homosexual. In the latter condition, rooms were significantly more likely to be described as unavailable. Comparisons are made to similar, previous research, and to current perspectives about community reactions to stigmatizing conditions.
PubMed ID
9736330 View in PubMed
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Access to fertility services for lesbian women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112457
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Shannon L Corbett
Helena M Frecker
Heather M Shapiro
Mark H Yudin
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Fertility Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: scorbett@conceive.ca.
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Canada
Female
Fertility
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Questionnaires
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Sex Factors
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
To determine reproductive services offered to lesbian patients by Canadian fertility clinics, policies of practice, ease of access to these services, and sensitivity of clinics to this population of patients.
Survey sent to assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinic directors.
Academic medical center, university-based ethics institute.
None.
The percentage of Canadian fertility clinics that will provide reproductive services to lesbian patients; services offered; the presence of clinic policies on lesbian care; and the presence on web sites of heteronormative material.
Completed surveys were received from 71% (24/34) of clinics. All clinics surveyed provided reproductive services to lesbian patients, with the exception of one clinic. Five of 24 (21%) clinics have a written policy on care for lesbian patients; 29% (7/24) will provide services to lesbian patients without prior investigations. All clinics will offer IUI and cycle monitoring to lesbian patients. Twenty-three of 24 clinics (96%) will offer IVF services when required. Fourteen of 32 clinic web sites (44%) make mention of lesbian patients and 27% (8/30) have heteronormative information only.
Lesbians encounter several barriers to accessing reproductive services in Canada. Addressing these issues could improve experiences of lesbian women and couples seeking care at fertility clinics.
PubMed ID
23830154 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounts of HIV seroconversion among substance-using gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148150
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jeffrey P Aguinaldo
Ted Myers
Karen Ryder
Dennis J Haubrich
Liviana Calzavara
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jaguinaldo@wlu.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality
Case-Control Studies
HIV Seropositivity - psychology - transmission
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
Statistical associations between substance use and seroconversion among gay and bisexual men abound. However, these associations often ignore men's own interpretations of their seroconversion. Using in-depth interviews with gay and bisexual men who reported using drugs or alcohol at the time of their seroconversion, we identify how these men explain the events that led to HIV transmission. Whereas a small minority of respondents reported substance use to explain their seroconversion, the majority reported three competing explanations. These participants claimed that they lacked sufficient knowledge about the behavioral risks that led to their seroconversion; that their decision to engage in unsafe sex was because of negative personal affect; and that they "trusted the wrong person." We link these findings to prevention and suggest that gay and bisexual men who use substances for recreational purposes will benefit from prevention efforts designed to address issues of gay and bisexual men rather than substance-using men.
PubMed ID
19805802 View in PubMed
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Acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The first cases in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242475
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1983;15(5-6):203-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
S L Valle
A. Ranki
H. Repo
J. Suni
A. Pönkä
J. Lähdevirta
T. Pettersson
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1983;15(5-6):203-5
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology
Adult
Finland
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Pneumonia, Pneumocystis - immunology
Sarcoma, Kaposi - immunology
Abstract
We report here on the first two patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Finland. The first patient, a 37-year-old man, had Kaposi's sarcoma and the other, a 26-year-old man, had pneumonia due to Pneumocystis carinii. Both patients were homosexuals and showed a marked defect in cell-mediated immunity consistent with the definition of AIDS. Both patients were found in a screening survey of homosexual men in Helsinki.
PubMed ID
6607697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)--Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241374
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1983 Dec 9;32(48):635-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1983
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1983 Dec 9;32(48):635-6
Date
Dec-9-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Adult
Canada
Haiti - ethnology
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
6417469 View in PubMed
Less detail

808 records – page 1 of 81.