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Abstention from filtered coffee reduces the concentrations of plasma homocysteine and serum cholesterol--a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53873
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Sep;74(3):302-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
B. Christensen
A. Mosdol
L. Retterstol
S. Landaas
D S Thelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. christensen@ioks.uio.no
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Sep;74(3):302-7
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cholesterol - blood
Coffee - adverse effects - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Filtration
Folic Acid - blood - metabolism
Homocysteine - blood - drug effects - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - etiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Elevated concentrations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and serum total cholesterol are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD). Previous studies showed that the consumption of very high doses of unfiltered coffee increases tHcy and total cholesterol. OBJECTIVE: A prospective intervention study was performed to assess the effects of coffee consumption on the concentrations of tHcy and total cholesterol by using doses and brewing methods common in southeastern Norway. DESIGN: The study was an unblinded, controlled trial with 191 healthy, nonsmoking, coffee-drinking volunteers aged 24-69 y randomly assigned to 3 groups who were asked to consume for 6 consecutive weeks no coffee, 1-3 cups (approximately 175-525 mL)/d, or > or =4 cups (approximately 700 mL)/d prepared in the manner to which they were accustomed. Blood samples were drawn when the subjects were randomly assigned and at 3 and 6 wk of the trial. Dietary data were collected by questionnaire. RESULTS: Ninety-seven percent of the participants reported being regular consumers of caffeinated filtered coffee. Abstention from coffee for 6 wk was associated with a decrease in the tHcy concentration of 1.08 micromol/L and a decrease in the total cholesterol concentration of 0.28 mmol/L in participants who had been drinking on average 4 cups of filtered coffee daily for the past year. Adjustments for several possible confounders did not alter the results. CONCLUSION: Abstention from filtered coffee in doses that are commonly consumed was associated with lower concentrations of tHcy and total cholesterol.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):948-9; author reply 949-5011976172
PubMed ID
11522552 View in PubMed
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An Ontario-wide study of vitamin B12, serum folate, and red cell folate levels in relation to plasma homocysteine: is a preventable public health issue on the rise?.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197028
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Jul;33(5):337-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
J G Ray
D E Cole
S C Boss
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Jul;33(5):337-43
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biological Markers
Creatinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - blood - metabolism
Hemoglobins
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Plasma homocysteine has been reported to be useful in the evaluation of patients with suspected vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. In November 1998, Canada began its mandatory fortification of all flour, and some corn and rice products, with folic acid. We evaluated the status of folate and vitamin B12 in Ontario since this fortification program began, and also studied the role of plasma homocysteine in the assessment of vitamin B12 deficiency since that time.
A retrospective cross-sectional study design was performed using a community database of all Ontario samples analyzed by MDS Laboratories, a major provider of diagnostic laboratory services in Canada. All consecutive single-patient fasting samples for plasma homocysteine collected between January 1 and September 30, 1999 were included, as well as corresponding red cell folate and serum B12 concentrations. Data for serum folate were included when available. Descriptive statistics included the arithmetic and geometric means for each measure, as well as the lower and upper centile values. After excluding cases with a concomitant serum creatinine > 120 micromol/L or red cell folate 15 micromol/L did not discriminate between cobalamin concentrations below versus above 120 pmol/L (positive and negative predictive values 7.4% and 97.2%, respectively), nor did it discriminate "indeterminate" B12 levels between 120 and 150 pmol/L (positive and negative predictive values 6.3% and 94.0%, respectively).
In a large select group of Ontarians, serum and red cell folate concentrations appear to be higher than expected, possibly due to a recent national folate fortification programme; cobalamin levels are no higher than expected. Given our inability to detect mild B12 deficiency using such indicators as plasma homocysteine, and considering the substantial growth in the elderly segment of the Canadian population, occult cobalamin deficiency could become a common disorder. Accordingly, we recommend either consideration of the addition of vitamin B12 to the current folate fortification programme, and/or the development of better methods for the detection of cobalamin deficiency.
PubMed ID
11018684 View in PubMed
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[Apropos homocysteine measurement in primary health care: validation of new methods is important].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199701
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Dec 8;96(49):5513-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-1999
Author
G. Lindstedt
C E Jakobsson
P A Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för klinisk kemi och transfusionsmedicin, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Dec 8;96(49):5513-6
Date
Dec-8-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Specimen Collection - economics - methods - standards
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Evidence-Based Medicine
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Primary Health Care
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The measurement of plasma homocysteine concentrations may be important both in health care and preventive medicine, provided that it is applied correctly, and that blood sampling, transport, and assays are state-of-the art procedures.
PubMed ID
10643247 View in PubMed
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Are plasma homocysteine and methionine elevated when binging and purging behavior complicates anorexia nervosa? Evidence against the transdiagnostic theory of eating disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145257
Source
Eat Weight Disord. 2009 Dec;14(4):e184-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
S M Innis
C L Birmingham
E J Harbottle
Author Affiliation
The Nutrition Research Program, Child and Family Research Institute, Deaprtment of Paediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A1, Canada.
Source
Eat Weight Disord. 2009 Dec;14(4):e184-9
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Binge-Eating Disorder - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Biological Markers - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Homocysteine - blood - metabolism
Humans
Laxatives - administration & dosage
Male
Methionine - blood - metabolism
Middle Aged
Vomiting
Abstract
To determine whether plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and plasma methionine levels are different in anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R) compared to anorexia nervosa binge eating/purging type (AN-BP).
Cross-sectional design.
Subjects were recruited from the outpatient program of the Eating Disorders Program at St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. All subjects had a current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental Disorders - Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) AN-R, or AN-BP diagnosis. Controls were recruited from staff and trainees of Child and Family Research Institute, and Children's and Women's Hospital, University of British Columbia.
Samples were obtained from AN-R (N=30), AN-BP (N=32) and control women (N=73) and men (N=33). The 5- 95th% confidence intervals from the control women were taken as the normal range. The plasma tHcy and methionine for the control group had a 5-95th percentile range of 5.66-10.57 and 15.3-40.2 microM, respectively. Plasma tHcy was elevated in women with AN-BP (9.24+/-0.85 microM, N=32) but not with AN-R (7.90+/-0.38 microM, N=30). Plasma methionine was decreased in women with AN-BP (22.2+/-1.43 microM, N=32) compared to the control group of women (25.1+/-0.89 microM). The plasma methionine/tHcy ratio was elevated in the women with AN-BP (0.50+/-0.09) but not in those with AN-R (0.34+/-0.03).
Elevated plasma tHcy and decreased plasma methionine are consistent with impaired homocysteine remethylation. Altered methyl transfer capacity or methyl deficiency could impair monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism potentially impacting cognitive and psychological function.We hypothesize that the treatment of AN-BP should consider the need for nutritional support of methyl metabolism.
PubMed ID
20179404 View in PubMed
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The association between atopy and factors influencing folate metabolism: is low folate status causally related to the development of atopy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81891
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;35(4):954-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Husemoen Lise Lotte N
Toft Ulla
Fenger Mogens
Jørgensen Torben
Johansen Niels
Linneberg Allan
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen County Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup, Denmark. lloh@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;35(4):954-61
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - metabolism
Genotype
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism
Male
Methionine - administration & dosage
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Polymorphism, Genetic
Questionnaires
Riboflavin - administration & dosage
Risk Assessment - methods
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage
Vitamin B 6 - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Deficiency of folate has been associated with several disorders characterized by enhanced activation of the cellular immune system (non-allergic th1 type immune response). Whether folate status is also associated with atopic disease (allergic th2 type immune response) is unknown. We aimed at examining the association between atopy and markers of impaired folate metabolism, i.e. MTHFR(C677T) genotype, plasma total homocysteine, and dietary intakes of methionine, folates, and vitamins B12, B6, and B2. METHODS: Cross-sectional population-based study of 1,671 male and female residents of Copenhagen County, Denmark, aged 30-60 years participating in a health examination during 1999-2001. Atopy was defined as positive levels of specific IgE against a panel of inhalant allergens. MTHFR(C677T) genotype was determined by PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. Total homocysteine was measured by fluorescent polarization immunoassay. Dietary vitamin intakes were estimated from a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The prevalence of atopy was associated with MTHFR(C677T) genotype. TT individuals had a significantly higher risk of atopy compared with CC/CT individuals [odds ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.19-2.60]. Additionally, gene-diet interaction effects were identified. Dietary markers were negatively associated with risk of atopy in persons with the TT genotype. Total homocysteine was not related to atopy (odds ratio per 5 mumol/l = 1.12, 95% CI 0.98-1.29). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that an impaired folate metabolism may be causally related to the development of atopy.
PubMed ID
16766537 View in PubMed
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Association between depressive symptoms and serum concentrations of homocysteine in men: a population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177055
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1574-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Tommi Tolmunen
Jukka Hintikka
Sari Voutilainen
Anu Ruusunen
Georg Alfthan
Kristiina Nyyssönen
Heimo Viinamäki
George A Kaplan
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1574-8
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - blood - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Folic Acid - blood
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Abstract
Results of studies of the association between blood concentrations of homocysteine and depression in general populations and among psychiatric patients are inconsistent.
The objective was to study the association between depression and serum concentrations of total homocysteine (tHcy).
A cross-sectional study of a sample of 924 men aged 46-64 y was conducted as a part of the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Those who had a history of psychiatric disorder (6.0%) were excluded. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the 18-item Human Population Laboratory Depression Scale. Those who scored > or =5 at baseline or at the 4-y follow-up were considered to have a tendency toward depression.
The participants were ranked according to their blood tHcy concentration and divided into tertiles. Those in the upper tertile for serum tHcy had a more than twofold (odds ratio: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.35, 3.90; P=0.002) higher risk of being depressed than did those in the lowest tertile for serum tHcy. The results remained significant after adjustment for the month of study, history of ischemic heart disease, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, marital status, education, and socioeconomic status in adulthood (odds ratio: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.30, 3.83; P=0.004).
High serum concentrations of tHcy may be associated with depression in middle-aged men.
PubMed ID
15585771 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of biochemical values with morbidity in the elderly: a population-based Swedish study of persons aged 82 or more years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13846
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(7-8):457-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S E Nilsson
S. Takkinen
N. Tryding
P E Evrin
S. Berg
G. McClearn
B. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden. gero@hhj.hj.se
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(7-8):457-66
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Chemical Analysis
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Creatine - blood
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Furosemide - therapeutic use
Gout - blood - epidemiology
Heart Failure, Congestive - blood - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Morbidity
Osteoporosis - blood - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer - blood
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Serum Albumin - analysis
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Urea - blood
Uric Acid - blood
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Various inter-dependent factors influence serum biochemical values. In the elderly, the impact of these factors may differ compared with younger age groups and therefore population-based studies among older people are needed. The specific morbidity in old age, including also various types of drug therapy, should be observed. METHODS: Various biochemical tests in 349 females and 186 males over 81 years of age were carried out and the associations of biochemical values with morbidity, drug therapy, anthropometry and gender were estimated. RESULTS: Biochemical serum values deviate in various diseases, characterized by increased frequency in the elderly, i.e. congestive heart failure, osteoporosis, hip fractures, depression and dementia. All of these diseases present a tendency to increased homocysteine, usually combined with low folate. Cases with intact cognitive function throughout the six years after sampling are characterized by low homocysteine, which is the opposite of what is found in dementia. Furthermore, congestive heart failure is associated with impaired creatinine clearance and increased urea and urate, and osteoporosis and hip fractures are characterized by low albumin and cholesterol. Increased values for urate and impaired creatinine clearance are found in coronary diseases. In gout, multiple biochemical changes take place. For cases with a history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, peptic ulcer and malignancy, few changes are found compared with the values of the total sample. Furosemide therapy is associated with the same pattern as congestive heart failure, and laxative treatment is characterized by low folate and high homocysteine values.
PubMed ID
14743954 View in PubMed
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Association of folate metabolism gene polymorphisms and pulmonary embolism: A case-control study of West-Siberian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270511
Source
Thromb Res. 2015 May;135(5):788-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Karmadonova NA
Shilova AN
Kozyreva VS
Subbotovskaya AI
Klevanets JE
Karpenko AA
Source
Thromb Res. 2015 May;135(5):788-95
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-Methyltetrahydrofolate-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase - genetics
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Female
Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase - genetics
Folic Acid - metabolism
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Middle Aged
Mutation
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Probability
Pulmonary Embolism - genetics
Siberia
Abstract
Our objective was to investigate the association between gene polymorphisms of folate cycle (MTHFR 677 C>T, MTHFR 1298 A>C, MTR 2756 A>G, and MTRR 66 A>G) and the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) in a case-control study.
177 PE patients (87 women and 90 men) were compared to a healthy control group (461 people, 123 women, 326 men). All of them are residents of Novosibirsk region. SNPs were genotyped by allele-specific PCR.
The age distributions of our male and female patients were found to be significantly different. For men, the distribution has two maxima, whereas for women it has only one maximum, which is between the two. This fact stimulated us to perform a sex-specific analysis. No statistically significant difference has been found between distributions of the three genes in our PE patients and healthy controls. However, it was discovered that the TT genotype of MTHFR: 677 C>T polymorphism in men increases the risk of PE in comparison to controls. In fact, the difference increases in the age group over 45years. Also, AA genotype of MTRR 66 A>G polymorphism in women below 45years decreases the risk of PE. The sex-specific multiple linear regression analysis gave us estimates of the relative PE risk associated with MTHFR 677 C>T, F2: 20210G>A (Prothrombin), and F5: 1691G>A (Leiden) mutations.
PubMed ID
25754229 View in PubMed
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Association of Homocysteine, Methionine, and MTHFR 677C>T Polymorphism With Rate of Cardiovascular Multimorbidity Development in Older Adults in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305891
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 05 01; 3(5):e205316
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-01-2020
Author
Amaia Calderón-Larrañaga
Marguerita Saadeh
Babak Hooshmand
Helga Refsum
A David Smith
Alessandra Marengoni
Davide L Vetrano
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 05 01; 3(5):e205316
Date
05-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Methionine - blood
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Multimorbidity
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Strong evidence links high total serum homocysteine (tHcy) and low methionine (Met) levels with higher risk of ischemic disease, but other cardiovascular (CV) diseases may also be associated with their pleiotropic effects.
To investigate the association of serum concentrations of tHcy and Met with the rate of CV multimorbidity development in older adults and to explore the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T polymorphism in this association.
The Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen is a cohort study of randomly selected individuals aged 60 years or older. The present study included data on 1969 individuals with complete information and without CV diseases at baseline, collected from the baseline examination (2001-2004) to the fourth follow-up (2013-2016). Data analysis was conducted from January to May 2019.
Concentrations of tHcy and Met were measured from nonfasting venous blood samples. The Met:tHcy ratio was considered a possible indicator of methylation activity. MTHFR status was dichotomized as any T carriers vs noncarriers.
The number of CV diseases at each wave was ascertained based on medical interviews and records, laboratory test results, and drug data. Linear mixed models were used to study the association of baseline tHcy and Met levels and the rate of CV multimorbidity development, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, CV risk factors, chronic disease burden, and drug use.
Of 1969 participants, most were women (1261 [64.0%]), with a mean (SD) age of 70.9 (9.8) years; 1703 participants (86.6%) had at least a high school level of education. Baseline measurements of serum tHcy, Met, and the Met:tHcy ratio were associated with the rate of CV disease accumulation (tHcy: ß?=?0.023 per year; 95% CI, 0.015 to 0.030; P?
PubMed ID
32432712 View in PubMed
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153 records – page 1 of 16.