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[Accidental falls in nursing homes. A study of the extent and circumstances of accidental falls in nursing homes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8144
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2950-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1992
Author
B. Viskum
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Vejle Amt.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2950-5
Date
Oct-19-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Accidental falls in 54 nursing homes with 2228 elderly residents aged 65 years and over were registered during a period of seven months. During the seven months, 512 of the elderly residents fell on a total of 934 occasions. Forty-two fractures of the neck of the femur occurred. The risk of falls for elderly residents of nursing homes is very high, but the majority of falls do not result in permanent damage. In this investigation, no differences could be demonstrated between staff groups or circumstances concerning falls with and without resultant damage. All falls should be regarded as warnings and result in detailed investigation of the circumstances of the fall in view of prophylactic measures. Accidental falls are caused by a complex interaction between a series of health, therapy, furnishing and attitudes. Various circumstances are emphasized in this investigation which are connected with an increased risk of falling, e.g. vertigo, problems of balance, certain aids and activities in connection with toileting.
PubMed ID
1462381 View in PubMed
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[Accidental falls in nursing homes. A study on the role of drugs in accidental falls in nursing homes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222882
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2955-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1992
Author
B. Viskum
S. Juul
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Vejle Amt.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2955-8
Date
Oct-19-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diuretics - adverse effects
Drug Utilization
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - adverse effects
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects
Risk factors
Abstract
The drug consumptions of 2228 residents in nursing homes aged 65 years and over were investigated and related to accidental falls during a period of seven months. 95% of the residents received treatment with one or more drugs and 33% with six or more drugs. The risk of accidental falls was significantly increased in persons receiving hypnotics, psychomarmaca and anti-Parkinson medicine. Individuals receiving diuretics, particularly thiazides, were less at risk for accidental falls. This investigation revealed an increased risk of falls particularly when residents were receiving treatment with a short-term hypnotic (Triazolam). It is recommended that this finding should be investigated further.
PubMed ID
1462382 View in PubMed
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Acute hospital admissions from nursing homes: predictors of unwarranted variation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114995
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Jun;41(4):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Birgitte Graverholt
Trond Riise
Gro Jamtvedt
Bettina S Husebo
Monica W Nortvedt
Author Affiliation
Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway. bgra@hib.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Jun;41(4):359-65
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Beds - statistics & numerical data
Health Facility Size - statistics & numerical data
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Suburban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The geriatric nursing home population is frail and vulnerable to sudden changes in their health condition. Very often, these incidents lead to hospitalization, in which many cases represent an unfavourable discontinuity of care. Analysis of variation in hospitalization rates among nursing homes where similar rates are expected may identify factors associated with unwarranted variation.
To 1) quantify the overall and diagnosis specific variation in hospitalization rates among nursing homes in a well-defined area over a two-year period, and 2) estimate the associations between the hospitalization rates and characteristics of the nursing homes.
The acute hospital admissions from 38 nursing homes to two hospitals were identified through ambulance records and linked to hospital patient journals (n = 2451). Overall variation in hospitalization rates for 2 consecutive years was tested using chi-square and diagnosis-specific variation using Systematic Component of Variation. Associations between rates and nursing home characteristics were tested using multiple regression and ANOVA.
Annual hospitalization rates varied significantly between 0.16 and 1.49 per nursing home. Diagnoses at discharge varied significantly between the nursing homes. The annual hospitalization rates correlated significantly with size (r = -0.38) and percentage short-term beds (r = 0.41), explaining 32% of the variation observed (R (2) = 0.319). No association was found for ownership status (r = 0.05) or location of the nursing home (p = 0.52).
A more than nine-fold variation in annual hospitalization rates among the nursing homes in one municipality suggests the presence of unwarranted variation. This finding demands for political action to improve the premises for a more uniform practice in nursing homes.
PubMed ID
23554388 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria causing urinary tract infections in the elderly living in nursing homes versus the elderly living at home: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269775
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mark Fagan
Morten Lindbæk
Nils Grude
Harald Reiso
Maria Romøren
Dagfinn Skaare
Dag Berild
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - classification - pharmacology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Escherichia coli Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Proteus Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Proteus mirabilis - drug effects
Sex Factors
Urinalysis - methods
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is a problem in nursing homes. Presumed urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common infection. This study examines urine culture results from elderly patients to see if specific guidelines based on gender or whether the patient resides in a nursing home (NH) are warranted.
This is a cross sectional observation study comparing urine cultures from NH patients with urine cultures from patients in the same age group living in the community.
There were 232 positive urine cultures in the NH group and 3554 in the community group. Escherichia coli was isolated in 145 urines in the NH group (64%) and 2275 (64%) in the community group. There were no clinically significant differences in resistance. Combined, there were 3016 positive urine cultures from females and 770 from males. Escherichia coli was significantly more common in females 2120 (70%) than in males 303 (39%) (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
26238248 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, Anxiety Symptoms, and Their Correlates in Persons with Dementia in Norwegian Nursing Homes: A Cause for Concern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292510
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2017; 43(5-6):294-305
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Alka Rani Goyal
Sverre Bergh
Knut Engedal
Marit Kirkevold
Øyvind Kirkevold
Author Affiliation
Centre of Old Age Psychiatry Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Ottestad, Norway.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2017; 43(5-6):294-305
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology - psychology
Dementia - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Patient Care Management - methods
Psychomotor Agitation - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Little is known about anxiety and its associations among persons with dementia in nursing homes. This study aims to examine anxiety, anxiety symptoms, and their correlates in persons with dementia in Norwegian nursing homes.
In all, 298 participants with dementia =65 years old from 17 nursing homes were assessed with a validated Norwegian version of the Rating Anxiety in Dementia scale (RAID-N). Associations between anxiety (RAID-N score) and demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed with linear regression models.
Anxiety, according to a cutoff of =12 on the RAID-N, was found in 34.2% (n = 102) of the participants. Irritability (59.7%) and restlessness (53.0%) were the most frequent anxiety symptoms. The participants' general physical health, a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms, and anxiolytic use were significant correlates of higher RAID-N scores.
Knowledge about anxiety, anxiety symptoms, and their correlates may enhance early detection of anxiety and planning of necessary treatment and proactive measures among this population residing in nursing homes.
PubMed ID
28463828 View in PubMed
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[Care for the elderly--elderly persons needing care should select residential community carefully].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205985
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1998 Mar 10;86(5):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
H K Otterstad
H. Tønseth
Author Affiliation
Statistisk sentralbyrå, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1998 Mar 10;86(5):54-7
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
9544132 View in PubMed
Less detail

Care professional's experiences about using Liverpool Care Pathway in end-of-life care in residential care homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295067
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):299-308
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Sofia Andersson
Olav Lindqvist
Carl-Johan Fürst
Margareta Brännström
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):299-308
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Decision Making
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
Residential care homes (RCHs) play an important role in end-of-life care, being the most common place of death for elderly people in several European countries. Care pathways such as the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP) are used to improve and ensure quality care at the end of life. There is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the use of care pathways.
A descriptive qualitative study.
The aim was to describe care professionals' experiences of using the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient in the care of dying residents in residential care homes.
Five focus group interviews and two individual interviews with enrolled nurses (n = 10), Registered Nurses (n = 9) and general practitioners (n = 5) were carried out and analysed using qualitative content analysis.
Care professionals expressed that they became confident through a shared approach to care, were supported to tailor the care according to the residents' individual needs, were supported to involve family members in decision-making and care and became more aware of the care environment.
The results of this study indicate that the LCP might be a useful tool for care professionals in improving end-of-life care in RCHs through increased attention to the goals of care, the individual needs of residents and family involvement.
PubMed ID
28664584 View in PubMed
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Changes between 1982 and 2000 in the prevalence of behavioral symptoms and psychotropic drug treatment among old people with cognitive impairment in geriatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95184
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2009 Oct;21(5):941-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Lövheim Hugo
Sandman Per-Olof
Karlsson Stig
Gustafson Yngve
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Sweden. hugo.lovheim@germed.umu.se
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2009 Oct;21(5):941-8
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aggression - drug effects
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology
Anti-Anxiety Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Surveys
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Residential Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: People with a dementia disorder often live in institutional care facilities, particularly when the dementia disorder becomes severe or complicated by various behavioral disturbances. The aim of the present study was to analyze and compare the one-week prevalence of various behavioral symptoms and psychotropic drug treatment among people with cognitive impairment living in institutional care, in two large, comparable samples from 1982 and 2000. METHODS: A comparison was made between two cross-sectional samples, collected in 1982 and 2000 respectively, comprising 3404 participants with cognitive impairment living in geriatric care units in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. Behavioral symptoms were measured using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS) and cognition was measured using Gottfries' cognitive scale. RESULTS: Eight out of 25 behavioral symptoms had become less common, and six more common, after controlling for demographic changes. Regressive behavior, resistance to care and passiveness became less common, while certain aberrant motor behaviors showed an increased prevalence. Antidepressant drug use increased from 6.8% to 43.2%, antipsychotic drug use decreased from 38.0% to 26.2% and anxiolytics, hypnotic and sedative drug use increased from 12.7% to 38.5%. CONCLUSION: One-week prevalence of regressive symptoms and resistance to care had decreased and there were signs of a generally increased activity level among old people with cognitive impairment living in institutional geriatric care in 2000 compared to 1982. These changes may be an effect of the extensive changes in pharmacological treatments and in the organization of institutional geriatric care.
PubMed ID
19586566 View in PubMed
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Changes in social support in relation to seniors' use of home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198016
Source
Health Rep. 2000;11(4):39-47 (Eng); 43-53 (Fre)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K. Wilkins
M P Beaudet
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division at Statistics Canada, Ottawa. wilkkat@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2000;11(4):39-47 (Eng); 43-53 (Fre)
Date
2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Abstract
This article examines seniors' entry into government-supported home care in relation to changes in levels of social support and in living arrangements.
The analysis is based on longitudinal data from the household component of the first two cycles of the National Population Health Survey, conducted by Statistics Canada in 1994/95 and 1996/97. Data from a sample of 2,044 people aged 65 or older who were followed prospectively were weighted to represent 2.7 million household-dwelling seniors.
Descriptive data were produced using bivariate frequencies. A multiple logistic regression model was used to examine associations between home care entry and changes in levels of social support and in living arrangements, while controlling for demographic and health-related factors.
Among people aged 65 or older who did not receive government-supported home care in 1994/95, an estimated 7% (192,000) were receiving these services in 1996/97. Changes in social support and in living arrangements between 1994/95 and 1996/97 were significantly associated with home care entry.
PubMed ID
10879329 View in PubMed
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Changing epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178028
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2004 Oct;58(2):109-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
A-M Kerttula
O. Lyytikäinen
S. Salmenlinna
J. Vuopio-Varkila
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. anne-marie.kerttula@ktl.fi
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2004 Oct;58(2):109-14
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services for the Aged - standards
History, 15th Century
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infection Control - methods
Laboratories - statistics & numerical data
Male
Methicillin Resistance
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Registries
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Staphylococcus aureus - classification - isolation & purification
Abstract
Data on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cases notified to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR) and antibiotic resistance profiles of MRSA isolates sent to the national reference laboratory between 1997 and 2002 were analysed. In addition, the diagnostic methods used for MRSA identification in Finnish microbiology laboratories, the number of MRSA screening specimens studied, and the MRSA situation in long-term care facilities in 2001 were reviewed. MRSA cases notified to the NIDR rose from 120 in 1997 to 597 in 2002 (from 2.3 to 11.5 cases per 100,000 population). The increase was greatest in elderly people and outside Helsinki metropolitan area, in the districts where the proportion of non-multiresistant strains was most prominent. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standard's guidelines for the oxacillin disk diffusion test were followed, except for the incubation temperature and time, which may have hindered detection of some MRSA strains. There was a wide geographic variation in the rates of MRSA, but this was not related to screening activity. MRSA isolates from long-term facilities accounted for more than half of the notifications to the NIDR in 2001.
PubMed ID
15474181 View in PubMed
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91 records – page 1 of 10.