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Parents' knowledge and choice of paracetamol dosing forms in 3- to 6-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86950
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Helgadóttir Helga Lára
Wilson Margaret E
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. helgalar@hi.is
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):93-7
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - administration & dosage
Administration, Oral
Administration, Rectal
Adult
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - administration & dosage
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Home Nursing - education - methods - psychology
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Abstract
Paracetamol is one of the most common medicines administered to children and is available in suppositories, mixtures, drops and tablets. Orally administered paracetamol is more rapidly and completely absorbed and is, in general, more acceptable to children. In Iceland, the most common route of paracetamol administration is per rectum. The purpose of the study was to explore parents' knowledge and usage of paracetamol for 3- to 6-year-old children. Parents (n = 103) of children in four playschools in Reykjavík participated in this survey research. Paracetamol was most commonly administered via suppository. Some parents were unaware of oral forms of paracetamol and had been advised by doctors, nurses or pharmacy staff to use suppositories. This study provides basic information needed to design appropriate parental education in pain and fever management.
PubMed ID
18269428 View in PubMed
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Patterns of pain and analgesic use in 3- to 7-year-old children after tonsillectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79543
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2006 Dec;7(4):159-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Wilson Margaret E
Helgadóttir Helga L
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-5330, USA. mwilson@unmc.edu
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2006 Dec;7(4):159-66
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesia - methods - psychology
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Health services needs and demand
Home Nursing - education - methods - psychology
Humans
Iceland
Male
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Discharge
Postoperative Care - methods - nursing - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Tonsillectomy - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Tonsillectomy is a common surgical procedure usually associated with moderate to severe pain. Although self-report is the gold standard for pain assessment, researchers have not studied young children at home with self-report measures. The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of self-reported pain intensity and analgesic administration in 3- to 7-year-old children undergoing tonsillectomy during the operative day in the hospital and the first 2 postoperative days at home in Iceland. As part of a larger study, 68 children undergoing tonsillectomy were taught to use the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale. Pain intensity scores and data about administration of analgesics were collected from children, the medical record, and the parents over a 3-day period. Children received primarily acetaminophen or acetaminophen with codeine in the hospital. At home, 99% of doses administered were acetaminophen only. Most doses were administered rectally. Forty percent of children received 24-hour therapeutic doses in the hospital. Only 10% received a 24-hour therapeutic dose at home despite significant pain scores of 4 or 5 persisting through the second postoperative day. Younger children were less likely to receive acetaminophen with codeine. In the hospital, children with pain intensity scores of 4 or 5 received prescribed morphine only 13% of the time. Children experienced clinically significant pain through the second postoperative day and will probably require a change in protocol to provide more aggressive pain management earlier. This study extends to younger children the research evidence that current pain protocols are inadequate.
PubMed ID
17145490 View in PubMed
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Voicing the strengths of Pacific Island parent caregivers of children who are medically fragile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179754
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jul;15(3):184-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Janice Haley
Rosanne C Harrigan
Author Affiliation
Hawaii Pacific University, Department of Nursing, USA. jhaley@hpu.edu
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jul;15(3):184-94
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Caregivers - education - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Disabled Children - rehabilitation
Female
Hawaii
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Home Nursing - education - methods - psychology
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Pacific Islands - ethnology
Parents - education - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Social Support
Spirituality
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Research is deficient regarding the strengths of Pacific Island parents of children who are medically fragile. The purpose of this qualitative ethnographic study was to explore the strengths of Pacific Island parents of these children. Audiotaped interviews were analyzed using Text Smart and peer review. The core theme reflecting strength was positive energy. Participants believed that parents needed to have the ability to handle emotional feelings, solve problems, connect with their spirituality, find meaning, take care of themselves, use family support, use community support, use a positive attitude, be resourceful, meet a challenge, interact with nature, and focus on the present. Themes were affirmed by the literature with the exception of interacting with nature, which may be indigenous to the population's cultural orientation.
PubMed ID
15189640 View in PubMed
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