Skip header and navigation

Refine By

401 records – page 1 of 41.

2. Home treatment of hemophilias in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250397
Source
Scand J Haematol Suppl. 1977;31:9-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
M. Blombäck
Source
Scand J Haematol Suppl. 1977;31:9-10
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hemophilia A - therapy
Home Care Services
Home Nursing
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
268022 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abuse is in the eye of the beholder. Report by family members about abuse of demented persons in home care. A total population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73259
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
M. Grafström
A. Nordberg
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - nursing
Elder Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a population-based study 219 family members of cognitively impaired elderly (casegroup) and 255 family members of cognitively healthy elderly (control-group) were interviewed about their situation as a caregiver to an old person. Twenty-six family members in the case-group reported abusive behavior in the care of the elderly at home. These family members are compared with 154 family members in the control-group, reporting other coping strategies than abusive. In the abusive group most of the elderly were in a mild stage of dementia, and the family members reported more strain in the care situation. The family members were older, judged their health as deteriorated, and were mostly living together with the dependent elderly.
PubMed ID
8310277 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance, avoidance, and ambiguity: conflicting social values about childhood disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170909
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Carol Levine
Author Affiliation
Families and Health Care Project, United Hospital Fund, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Data Collection
Dependency (Psychology)
Disabled Children - psychology
Family Relations
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Parents - psychology
Quebec
Respiration, Artificial - ethics - psychology
Siblings - psychology
Social Isolation
Social Justice
Social Values
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
Advances in medical technology now permit children who need ventilator assistance to live at home rather than in hospitals or institutions. What does this ventilator-dependent life mean to children and their families? The impetus for this essay comes from a study of the moral experience of 12 Canadian families--parents, ventilator-dependent child, and well siblings. These families express great love for their children, take on enormous responsibilities for care, live with uncertainty, and attempt to create "normal" home environments. Nevertheless, they experience social isolation, sometimes even from their extended families and health care providers. Their lives are constrained in many ways. The challenges faced by parents of technology-dependent children raise questions of justice within society and within families.
PubMed ID
16453960 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A cross-sectional study in Sundsvall. 90-year-old persons are healthier than expected. The majority live in their own flats].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232132
Source
Lakartidningen. 1988 Nov 30;85(48):4202, 4207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1988

Active consideration: conceptualizing patient-provided support for spouse caregivers in the context of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190673
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Apr;12(4):492-514
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Karen D Fergus
Ross E Gray
Margaret I Fitch
Manon Labrecque
Catherine Phillips
Author Affiliation
York University.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Apr;12(4):492-514
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Female
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Ontario
Prostatectomy - nursing
Prostatic Neoplasms - nursing - psychology - surgery
Social Support
Abstract
In this study, the authors examine the under-investigated topic of patient-provided support for spouse caregivers. Thirty-four men with prostate cancer and their female partners were interviewed separately three times: before the man's radical prostatectomy, 8 to 10 weeks postsurgery, and 1 year postsurgery. The core category of active consideration encompassed 4 dimensions: easing spousal burden, keeping us up, maintaining connection, and considering spouse. Patient-provided support entails two overlapping tasks: minimizing the practical and emotional impact of the illness and tending to the caregiver's social-emotional needs. A theory expounding on the double bind of being both a patient and an agent in light of masculine socialization practices is articulated and brought to bear on the phenomenon of patient-provided support.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2003 Jan;6(1):3112546049
PubMed ID
11939250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute admissions to a community hospital - health consequences: a randomized controlled trial in Hallingdal, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267407
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2014;15:198
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Øystein Lappegard
Per Hjortdahl
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2014;15:198
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Home Nursing - utilization
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, General
Humans
Length of Stay
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - utilization
Patient Outcome Assessment
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health care professionals in several countries are searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Hallingdal, Norway, selected acute patients are admitted to a community hospital. The aim of this study was to analyse whether acute admission to a community hospital as an alternative to a general hospital had any positive or negative health consequences for the patients.
Patients intended for acute admission to the local community hospital were asked to join a randomized controlled trial. One group of the enrolled patients was admitted as planned (group 1, n = 33), while another group was admitted to the general hospital (group 2, n = 27). Health outcomes were measured by the Nottingham Extended Activity of Daily Living Questionnaire and by collection of data concerning specialist and community health care services in a follow-up year.
After one year, no statistical significant differences in the level of daily function was found between group 1 (admissions to the community hospital) and group 2 (admissions to the general hospital). Group 1 had recorded fewer in-patient days at hospitals and nursing homes, as well as lower use of home nursing, than group 2. For outpatient referrals, the trend was the opposite. However, the differences between the two groups were not at a 5% level of statistical significance.
No statistical significant differences at a 5% level were found related to health consequences between the two randomized groups. The study however, indicates a consistent trend of health benefits rather than risk from acute admissions to a community hospital, as compared to the general hospital. Emergency admission and treatment at a lower-level facility than the hospital thus appears to be a feasible solution for a selected group of patients.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01069107 . Registered 2 April 2010.
Notes
Cites: Nurs Stand. 2010 Jul 14-20;24(45):35-920701051
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Jun;40(4):309-1522786914
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Dec;13(4):250-68693208
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:6817475006
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007 Dec;55(12):1995-200217979957
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;23(11):1141-718457336
Cites: Age Ageing. 1993 Nov;22(6):419-248310887
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2013;14:8723800090
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Dec 21;382(9910):2069-7624054816
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;119:27-3525137645
Cites: Aust N Z J Med. 2000 Apr;30(2):252-6010833119
Cites: Transplant Proc. 2009 Nov;41(9):3693-619917369
Cites: Fam Pract. 2004 Apr;21(2):173-915020387
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2001 Feb;51(463):95-10011217640
PubMed ID
25491726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute head injuries in children. A retrospective epidemiologic, child psychiatric and electroencephalographic study on primary school children in Umea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109745
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1970;209:Suppl 209:3-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970

Adult children's perceptions of their responsibility to provide care for dependent elderly parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220996
Source
Gerontologist. 1993 Jun;33(3):315-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
C. Wolfson
R. Handfield-Jones
K C Glass
J. McClaran
E. Keyserlingk
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Montreal General Hospital, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Gerontologist. 1993 Jun;33(3):315-23
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aggression
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Dependency (Psychology)
Family - psychology
Female
Health Policy
Home Nursing
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Questionnaires
Role
Social Support
Abstract
We examined how adult children in Canada whose parents were hospitalized in an acute care setting perceived responsibility for their parents' care. Using a visual analogue scale, adult children rated the amount of financial, emotional, and physical support families "should" and "could" give to elderly persons described in four vignettes. All scores were high, with "should" consistently higher than "could" for every vignette and for each of the three types of support. For daughters, the more aggressive the parent, the lower the "should" score for financial support. The same relationship was observed for incontinence and these findings were consistent over all four vignettes.
PubMed ID
8325518 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A follow-up study of severely physically handicapped children and young people in free environments]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44277
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1969 Jul 3;131(27):1167-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-1969

Aging in the United Kingdom and Europe--a snapshot of the future?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83306
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Sep;53(9 Suppl):S310-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Carpenter George Iain
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Services Studies, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK. G.I.Carpenter@kent.ac.uk
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Sep;53(9 Suppl):S310-3
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Caregivers
Community Health Services
Cultural Diversity
Europe
European Union
Forecasting
Great Britain
Home Care Services
Home Nursing
Humans
Life expectancy
Longevity - physiology
Political Systems
Social Conditions
Abstract
The implications for society of increasing life span to 120 years can only be guessed, but comparing the diversity of responses to aging in different countries may give insights into the possible effect. A European Union-funded study of the recipients of community care services in 11 European countries illustrates how such studies can help identify some of the issues. The study, made possible by the availability of a multidimensional standardized assessment for community care, illustrates how diversity of social and political history and culture results in widely different patterns of dependency in those cared for at home, different levels of formal care, and informal caregiver burden. There is wide variation in living arrangements, marital status, and dependency between countries. The average age of recipients of community care is approximately 82, regardless of the average age of the national population. In Italy, which has the oldest population in Europe, dependency in people supported at home in extended families is high, with little formal care and significant levels of informal caregiver burden. In contrast the Nordic countries have lower levels of dependency and greater proportions of people with no informal caregiver. In Germany, informal caregiver burden may be related to the regulatory mechanisms rather than dependency and levels of formal care. With a life expectancy of 120, it will be these 80-year-olds who will be caring for their parents. Although humankind is resourceful, it will require a unified approach to aging to overcome the challenging diversity in our societies.
PubMed ID
16131360 View in PubMed
Less detail

401 records – page 1 of 41.