Skip header and navigation

Refine By

420 records – page 1 of 42.

Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accessibility and waiting time in general practice. A patient study in Northern Norway in 1987].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228019
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3484-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1990
Author
B. Straume
A. Forsdahl
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3484-8
Date
Nov-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Consumer Satisfaction
Family Practice - organization & administration - standards
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In the opinion of the public, accessibility is probably one of the most important features of general practice. More than 3,500 patients in North Norway answered a questionnaire asking for their opinions on waiting time for consultation, the time spent in consultation and the possibility of the doctor visiting them at home. 80% thought that a waiting time of more than one week was too long. The actual waiting times differ considerably, but only a few practices serving less than 900 inhabitants per physician managed to satisfy their patients. On the other hand, about 80% found the time allocated for the consultation to be adequate. Almost half the patients who expressed an opinion thought it too difficult to get a doctor to visit them at home. Less than 10% considered a long distance to travel to a doctor to be an obstacle. Not surprisingly, young people were most demanding as regards quick service. Men were somewhat more satisfied than women, as were patients in rural areas compared with patients in the towns. In our opinion, some of the patients' causes of dissatisfaction can be removed by better routines. However, it seems that the resources available within general practice, are inadequate to meet all the patients' wishes, either now or in the future.
PubMed ID
2256076 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Dec;54(12):1702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jyoti A Kotecha
Richard V Birtwhistle
Author Affiliation
Centre for Studies in Primary Care, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Dec;54(12):1702
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Program Evaluation - methods
PubMed ID
19074713 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accountability, responsiveness and quality for clients model of home support: a model for improved home support services to promote aging at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146209
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):65-71; discussion 79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Judy Kelly
Alison Orr
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Coastal Health.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):65-71; discussion 79-83
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Population Dynamics
Social Support
Abstract
As the proportion of older adults increases within the Canadian population, healthcare systems across the country are facing increased demands for home-based services, including home care nursing, rehabilitation, case management, adult day programs, respite, meal programs and home support. Home support is one of the core care services required in the community to enable older adults to remain at home as long as possible. In 2006, Vancouver Community introduced a new home support delivery and performance management model: the Accountability, Responsiveness and Quality for Clients Model of Home Support (ARQ Model) (VCH 2006). The main components of the ARQ Model are an expanded use of "cluster care" along with stable monthly funding for high-density buildings and neighbourhoods; the introduction of specific monthly and quarterly quality performance reporting; and the implementation of performance-based funding for home support. This article discusses the setup of the ARQ model, its ongoing evaluation and results achieved thus far.
PubMed ID
20057219 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute hospital use, nursing home placement, and mortality in a frail community-dwelling cohort managed with Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123476
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ted Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia and Island Medical Program, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. trosenberg@gem-health.com
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Demography
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Nursing Homes - utilization
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of medical Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home (PIECH) on acute hospital use and mortality in a frail elderly population.
Comparison of acute hospital care use for the year before entering the practice (pre-entry) with the most-recent 12-month period (May 1, 2010-April 30, 2011, postentry) for active and discharged patients.
Community.
All 248 frail elderly adults enrolled in the practice for at least 12 months who were living in the community and not in nursing homes in Victoria, British Columbia.
Primary geriatric care provided by a physician, nurse, and physiotherapist in participants' homes.
Acute hospital admissions, emergency department (ED) contacts that did not lead to admission, reason for leaving practice, and site of death.
There was a 39.7% (116 vs 70; P = .004) reduction in hospital admissions, 37.6% (1,700 vs 1,061; P = .04) reduction in hospital days, and 20% (120 vs 95; P = .20) reduction in ED contacts after entering the practice. Fifty participants were discharged from the practice, 64% (n = 32) of whom died, 20% (n = 10) moved, and 16% (n = 8) were admitted to nursing homes. Fifteen (46.9%) deaths occurred at home.
Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home may reduce acute hospital admissions and facilitate home deaths.
PubMed ID
22694020 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute stroke unit care combined with early supported discharge. Long-term effects on quality of life. A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45787
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2004 Aug;18(5):580-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Hild Fjaertoft
Bent Indredavik
Roar Johnsen
Stian Lydersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Motion, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. hild.fjartoft@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2004 Aug;18(5):580-6
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cerebrovascular Accident - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Early Ambulation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient care team
Patient Discharge
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present trial was to compare the effects of an extended stroke unit service (ESUS) with the effects of an ordinary stroke unit service (OSUS) on long-term quality of life (QoL). DESIGN: One year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial with 320 acute stroke patients allocated either to OSUS (160 patients) or ESUS (160 patients) with early supported discharge and follow-up by a mobile team. The intervention was a mobile team and close co-operation with the primary health care service. All assessments were blinded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Primary outcome of QoL in this paper was measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) at 52 weeks. Secondary outcomes measured at 52 weeks were differences between the groups measured by the Frenchay Activity Index, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale, Mini-Mental State Score and the Caregivers Strain Index. RESULTS: The ESUS group had a significantly better QoL (mean score 78.9) assessed by global NHP after one year than the OSUS group (mean score 75.2) (p =0.048). There were no significant differences between the groups in the secondary outcomes, but a trend in favour of ESUS. Caregivers Strain Index showed a mean score of 23.3 in the ESUS group and 22.6 in the OSUS group (p=0.089). CONCLUSION: It seems that stroke unit treatment combined with early supported discharge in addition to reducing the length of hospital stay can improve long-term QoL. However, similar trials are necessary to confirm the benefit of this type of service.
PubMed ID
15293492 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation and implementation of the nurse-family partnership in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Susan M Jack
Dianne Busser
Debbie Sheehan
Andrea Gonzalez
Emily J Zwygers
Harriet L Macmillan
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. jacksm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
International agencies are required to adapt, pilot and then evaluate the effectiveness of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) prior to broad implementation of this public health intervention. The objectives of this qualitative case study were to: 1) determine whether the NFP can be implemented in Canada with fidelity to the US model, and 2) identify the adaptations required to increase the acceptability of the intervention for service providers and families.
108 low-income, first-time mothers in Hamilton, Ontario, received the NFP intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with NFP clients (n=38), family members (n=14) and community professionals (n=24).
Hamilton, Ontario.INTERVENTION AND DATA COLLECTION: An intensive nurse home visitation program delivered to women starting early in pregnancy and continuing until the child was two years old. Processes to adapt and implement the NFP were explored across seven focus groups with public health nurses and managers. Eighty documents were reviewed to identify implementation challenges. Data were analyzed using directed content analysis.
The NFP model elements are acceptable to Canadian health care providers, public health nurses and families receiving the intervention. The primary adaptation required was to reduce nurse caseloads from 25 to 20 active clients. Recommendations for adapting and implementing all model elements are described.
The NFP model requires minor adaptations to increase the acceptability of the intervention to Canadian stakeholders. A consistent approach to adapting the NFP program in Canada is necessary as provincial jurisdictions commit themselves to supporting an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of the NFP.
PubMed ID
23618049 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced palliative home care: next-of-kin's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18088
Source
J Palliat Med. 2003 Oct;6(5):749-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Anna Milberg
Peter Strang
Maria Carlsson
Susanne Börjesson
Author Affiliation
Linköpings Universitet, Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Research Unit, Linköping, Sweden. anna.milberg@lio.se
Source
J Palliat Med. 2003 Oct;6(5):749-56
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - psychology
Comparative Study
Family - psychology
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
GOALS: (1). To describe what aspects are important when next-of-kin evaluate advanced palliative home care (APHC) and (2). to compare the expressed aspects and describe eventual differences among the three settings, which differed in terms of length of services, geographic location, and population size. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Four to 7 months after the patient's death (87% from cancer), 217 consecutive next-of-kin from three different settings in Sweden responded (response rate 86%) to three open-ended questions via a postal questionnaire. Qualitative content analysis was performed. MAIN RESULTS: Service aspects and comfort emerged as main categories. The staff's competence, attitude and communication, accessibility, and spectrum of services were valued service aspects. Comfort, such as feeling secure, was another important aspect and it concerned the next-of-kin themselves, the patients, and the families. Additionally, comfort was related to interactional issues such as being in the center and sharing caring with the staff. The actual place of care (i.e., being at home) added to the perceived comfort. Of the respondents, 87% described positive aspects of APHC and 28% negative aspects. No major differences were found among the different settings. CONCLUSIONS: Next-of-kin incorporate service aspects and aspects relating to the patient's and family's comfort when evaluating APHC. The importance of these aspects is discussed in relation to the content of palliative care and potential goals.
PubMed ID
14622454 View in PubMed
Less detail

420 records – page 1 of 42.