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The 13th Annual CARNA Awards of Nursing Excellence: Meet the recipients of Alberta's premier registered nursing awards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121391
Source
Alta RN. 2012;68(2):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

[19th International Nursing Care Conference, Helsinki 14-16 June 1997].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209783
Source
Hoitotiede. 1997;9(5):246-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1997
Author
T. Bondas-Salonen
L. Lindholm
D. Matilainen
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för vårdvetenskap Abo Akademi. caring@abo.fi
Source
Hoitotiede. 1997;9(5):246-8
Date
1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Finland
Holistic Health
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Nursing Care
Societies, Nursing
PubMed ID
9460361 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
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Addressing the spiritual dimension in Canadian undergraduate nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182952
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2003 Sep;35(3):94-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Joanne K Olson
Pauline Paul
Lillian Douglass
Margaret B Clark
Jane Simington
Nancy Goddard
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, 3rd Floor, Clinical Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G3, Canada. Joanne.olson@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2003 Sep;35(3):94-107
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Holistic Nursing - education
Humans
Religion and Medicine
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify the extent to which the spiritual dimension is addressed in Canadian university undergraduate nursing curricula. An exploratory descriptive design was used to gather data from faculty members at Canadian university schools of nursing. Eighteen (62%) of the 29 eligible schools participated. The findings indicate that conceptual confusion exists and that the spiritual dimension is rarely defined or included in curricular objectives. However, they also indicate that the spiritual dimension is more frequently evident in course objectives and that a number of creative methods are used to address it. Testing in this area is sporadic and limited. The results indicate that greater attention could be given to this dimension.
PubMed ID
14603573 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative health care options in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196230
Source
Can Nurse. 1999 Nov;95(10):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
J. McClennon-Leong
J R Kerr
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 1999 Nov;95(10):26-30
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Complementary Therapies - trends - utilization
Holistic Nursing - trends
Humans
State Medicine - trends - utilization
PubMed ID
11140037 View in PubMed
Less detail

Building bridges: an interpretive phenomenological analysis of nurse educators' clinical experience using the T.R.U.S.T. Model for inclusive spiritual care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124067
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2012;9:1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Karen Scott Barss
Author Affiliation
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science & Technology, Canada. karen.barss@siast.sk.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2012;9:1-17
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Holistic Health
Holistic Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Faculty Practice - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Spiritual Therapies - methods
Spirituality
Abstract
Educating nurses to provide evidence-based, non-intrusive spiritual care in today's pluralistic context is both daunting and essential. Qualitative research is needed to investigate what helps nurse educators feel more prepared to meet this challenge. This paper presents findings from an interpretive phenomenological analysis of the experience of nurse educators who used the T.R.U.S.T. Model for Inclusive Spiritual Care in their clinical teaching. The T.R.U.S.T. Model is an evidence-based, non-linear resource developed by the author and piloted in the undergraduate nursing program in which she teaches. Three themes are presented: "The T.R.U.S.T. Model as a bridge to spiritual exploration"; "blockades to the bridge"; and "unblocking the bridge". T.R.U.S.T. was found to have a positive influence on nurse educators' comfort and confidence in the teaching of spiritual care. Recommendations for maximizing the model's positive impact are provided, along with "embodied" resources to support holistic teaching and learning about spiritual care.
PubMed ID
22628352 View in PubMed
Less detail

Care provider perspectives on end-of-life care in long-term-care homes: implications for whole-person and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141476
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(2):122-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Joanie Sims-Gould
Elaine Wiersma
Lise Arseneau
Mary Lou Kelley
Jean Kozak
Sonja Habjan
Michael MacLean
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, 315-2647 Willow Street, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9. simsg@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(2):122-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Dementia - therapy
Holistic Nursing
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Long-Term Care
Nursing Homes
Ontario
Palliative Care
Professional-Patient Relations
Terminal Care
Workload
Abstract
This study holistically explores the experience of dying and end-of-life care for older persons with dementia in long-term care (LTC) from the perspective of care providers. Using a focused ethnography methodology, seven researchers interviewed LTC staff, residents' families, volunteers, management staff, and spiritual advisers/clergy over a five-day period. Research was guided by two key questions: What is the dying experience of people living in LTC from the perspective of different care providers? and, What are the salient issues in providing palliative care for elderly people dying in LTC? Based on a thematic analysis of verbatim data, three common themes were identified: tension between completing job tasks on time and "being there" for residents; the importance of family-like bonds between front-line staff and residents; and the importance of communication among staff and between staff and residents and their families at the end of life. Findings are discussed in relation to their implications for policies and practices that can support whole-person care and ultimately a good death for residents of LTC facilities.
PubMed ID
20718397 View in PubMed
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Caring for children in pediatric intensive care units: an observation study focusing on nurses' concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260309
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Aug;20(5):528-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Janet Mattsson
Maria Forsner
Maaret Castrén
Maria Arman
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Aug;20(5):528-38
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Critical Care Nursing
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric - ethics - organization & administration
Interviews as Topic
Male
Nursing Process - standards
Patient-Centered Care
Pediatric Nursing
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Children in the pediatric intensive care unit are indisputably in a vulnerable position, dependent on nurses to acknowledge their needs. It is assumed that children should be approached from a holistic perspective in the caring situation to meet their caring needs. The aim of the study was to unfold the meaning of nursing care through nurses' concerns when caring for children in the pediatric intensive care unit. To investigate the qualitative aspects of practice embedded in the caring situation, the interpretive phenomenological approach was adopted for the study. The findings revealed three patterns: medically oriented nursing--here, the nurses attend to just the medical needs, and nursing care is at its minimum, leaving the children's needs unmet; parent-oriented nursing care--here, the nursing care emphasizes the parents' needs in the situation, and the children are viewed as a part of the parent and not as an individual child with specific caring needs; and smooth operating nursing care orientation--here, the nursing care is focused on the child as a whole human being, adding value to the nursing care. The conclusion drawn suggests that nursing care does not always respond to the needs of the child, jeopardizing the well-being of the child and leaving them at risk for experiencing pain and suffering. The concerns present in nursing care has been shown to be the divider of the meaning of nursing care and need to become elucidated in order to improve the cultural influence of what can be seen as good nursing care within the pediatric intensive care unit.
PubMed ID
23329781 View in PubMed
Less detail

Complementary and alternative therapies: role and responsibilities of the registered nurse. Saskatchewan Registered Nurses' Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200028
Source
Concern. 1999 Feb;28(1):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Source
Concern. 1999 Feb;28(1):16-8
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies
Ethics, Nursing
Holistic Nursing - standards
Humans
Nurses - standards
Saskatchewan
PubMed ID
10595021 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 1997 Feb;3(1):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
L. Veal
Source
Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 1997 Feb;3(1):12-5
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - organization & administration
Health Resorts
Holistic Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Iceland
Nurse Midwives - organization & administration
Abstract
In general, complementary health is blossoming in Iceland, although, as in other countries, many people do not realize the full potential of the different therapies in terms of the range of ailments that can be treated. Reflexology and other types of massage are probably the most popular therapies, but there is a general awareness of herbal medicine and the use of vitamin and mineral supplements.
PubMed ID
9432421 View in PubMed
Less detail

79 records – page 1 of 8.