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12 records – page 1 of 2.

A cohort study with regard to the risk of haematological malignancies in patients treated with x-rays for benign lesions in the locomotor system. I. Epidemiological analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14355
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):713-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
L. Damber
L G Larsson
L. Johansson
T. Norin
Author Affiliation
Departments of Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):713-9
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Marrow - radiation effects
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Joint Diseases - radiotherapy
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Lymphoma - epidemiology - mortality
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology
Muscular Diseases - radiotherapy
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Radiotherapy Dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin - radiation effects
Spinal Osteophytosis - radiotherapy
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Roentgen treatment for painful benign conditions in the locomotor system as arthrosis and spondylosis was in Sweden very common up to the beginning of the 1960s. The mode of treatment differed from the British ankylosing spondylitis series as smaller parts of the red bone marrow were exposed and smaller doses were applied. A cohort of 20,024 such patients treated 1950-1964 at two hospitals in northern Sweden was analysed with regard to the risk of haematological malignancies. Average factors for conversion of prescribed skin doses to mean absorbed red bone marrow doses were estimated on random samples of the different treatment sites and then applied on the cohort in its whole. The standard incidence ratio (SIR) for leukaemia was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.98-1.42) and the standard mortality ratio (SMR) 1.25 (0.99-1.45). In the highest dose group (mean absorbed red bone marrow dose > 0.5 Gy) the corresponding values were 1.40 (1.00-1.92) and 1.50 (1.08-2.04). In the mortality analysis also a slightly increased myeloma risk was noted with SMR = 1.20 (0.99-1.56). Extension of the cohort and nested case-control studies are under progress.
PubMed ID
7576736 View in PubMed
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Does location matter? Rural vs urban outcomes after blood and marrow transplantation in a population-based Canadian cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146680
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2010 Jul;45(7):1167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
K. Paulson
P. Lambert
C. Bredeson
A. Demers
J. Nowatzki
E. Richardson
M. Rubinger
D. Szwajcer
M D Seftel
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. umpaul02@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2010 Jul;45(7):1167-73
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bone Marrow Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Stem Cell Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Urban Population
Abstract
Specialized health services, such as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT), are usually based in large urban centers. Previous research has suggested that rural patients undergoing BMT have a higher risk of death. We performed a cohort study using data from both the Manitoba BMT Program and the provincial Cancer Registry to determine whether patients from the rural areas would have inferior survival after BMT and whether rural patients have reduced access to BMT. A total of 463 adult Manitobans, who underwent BMT between January 1990 and December 2006, were assessed. We analyzed area of residence (rural vs urban), disease and BMT characteristics, and calculated the OS. Patients undergoing autologous and allogeneic transplants were analyzed separately. When adjusted for gender, age at BMT and year of BMT, area of residence was not a significant predictor of mortality. A relative survival analysis was also conducted, and area of residence was again not a significant predictor of mortality. To measure access to BMT in urban vs rural patients, we evaluated all patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL) during this same period. Of 432 Manitobans diagnosed with HL, 182 (42%) were rural and 250 (58%) were urban. In contrast, 69% of patients undergoing transplant for HL were urban. In conclusion, using population-based data from a Canadian province, we were unable to show a survival disadvantage for rural patients after controlling for other variables. BMT utilization in rural populations deserves further study.
PubMed ID
20010868 View in PubMed
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Hodgkin's disease in 82 Turkish children diagnosed over a 10-year period: epidemiological, clinical, and histopathologic features and prognosis with prolonged chemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22025
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1997 Jul-Aug;14(4):359-66
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Ertem
F. Duru
A. Dagdemir
N. Taçyildiz
A. Pamir
A. Akçayöz
O. Uluoglu
T. Teziç
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Oncology and Pathology, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1997 Jul-Aug;14(4):359-66
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Bleomycin - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Cyclophosphamide - administration & dosage
Dacarbazine - administration & dosage
Doxorubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Prednisone - administration & dosage
Procarbazine - administration & dosage
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Turkey
Vinblastine - administration & dosage
Vincristine - administration & dosage
Abstract
In this study, 82 Turkish children with Hodgkin's disease (HD) between 1 and 14 years of age and diagnosed over a 10-year period were evaluated retrospectively. More than half of the patients (54%) presented with advanced stages of HD. Mixed cellularity (MC) was the most frequent (56.1%) histopathologic type, which was followed by nodular sclerosing (NS, 18.3%) in frequency. None of the patients received radiotherapy as initial treatment. In 67 children the COPP regimen alone and in 15 the ABVD regimen alternating with COPP were started, to be given as a total of 12 courses. In the patients who presented with stage I-II HD the overall survival (OAS) rate and 5-year event free survival (EFS) rate were 92.3% and 77.8%, respectively. In the patients with advanced disease (stage III-IV) OAS and 5-year EFS were estimated to be 89.5% and 67.4%, respectively. No serious toxicity of chemotherapy was detected during the follow-up. In this group, clinical, epidemiological and histopathologic features of the disease showed a special pattern close to the type I pattern of HD. Regarding the survival rules and occurrence of low toxicity in our patients, results of prolonged chemotherapy alone seem to be encouraging in most of the children with HD. However, the follow-up duration is not yet sufficient to declare a clear conclusion related to the late complications.
PubMed ID
9211540 View in PubMed
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Hodgkin's disease in Denmark. A national clinical study by the Danish Hodgkin Study Group, LYGRA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27316
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1980 Apr;24(4):321-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1980 Apr;24(4):321-34
Date
Apr-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - epidemiology
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphography
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging - standards
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Postoperative Complications
Prognosis
Splenectomy - adverse effects
Abstract
During the last 8 years (1971-1979) all newly diagnosed previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease in Denmark have been centralized to uniform staging procedures and treatment. A total of 802 patients were registered, or 2 patients/100 000. Lymphangiography was performed in 708 patients (88%), and 437 patients (55%) underwent laparotomy with splenectomy. Treatment included radiotherapy, combination chemotherapy (MOPP or similar programmes), and combined modality treatment. The overall 8-year actuarial survival for all stages combined was 66%, and relapse-free survival was 55%. 144 patients died of Hodgkin's disease, 23 from complications to therapy and examination procedures, and 54 died of unrelated causes. Survival was significantly better for patients without B-symptoms, and decreased gradually with advancing age. There was a strong correlation between unfavourable prognosis and advancing stage and/or histology, but mediastinal involvement had no influence upon the prognosis. Staging laparotomy was associated with 4 deaths due to infection, and splenectomy with 10 cases of severe pneumococcal infections, 4 of which were fatal. Fatal complications due to subsequent treatment included 2 cases of cardiac arrest following mantle-field irradiation and 3 cases of haemorrhage or sepsis following chemotherapy. 5 cases of acute myeloid leukaemia were observed.
PubMed ID
6932097 View in PubMed
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Hodgkin's disease in Western India: review of 1082 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27030
Source
Cancer. 1982 Jul 15;50(2):353-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1982
Author
G V Talvalkar
M B Sampat
P. Gangadharan
Source
Cancer. 1982 Jul 15;50(2):353-9
Date
Jul-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Colombia
Comparative Study
Connecticut
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
India
Japan
Lymphoma - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Norway
Registries
Sex Factors
Abstract
Hodgkin's disease (HD) had a low overall incidence rate in Bombay when compared to western countries. However, the incidence rate in childhood was quite high. Review of 1082 cases of Hodgkin's disease recorded at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay. India during a period of 35 years showed that mixed cellularity, with 54% of the total, was the most frequent histologic subtype and this, together with lymphocyte depleted type formed 68% of all HD. The nodular sclerosis type formed only 9%. A bimodal character of the age pattern with a young age peak in the second decade of life, a male preponderance, a high incidence in childhood, and the predominance of low survival types, are the major features of the disease in India. The current data, which are the largest series reported from Bombay and other parts of India, indicate that the type-I pattern as described by Correa and O'Connor may be the characteristic feature of the Hodgkin's disease in India.
PubMed ID
7083142 View in PubMed
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Multiple sclerosis and Hodgkin's disease in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27846
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1976 May;53(5):358-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1976
Author
J F Kurtzke
H. Hamtoft
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1976 May;53(5):358-75
Date
May-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - mortality
Sex Factors
Abstract
There has been a hypothesis that Hodgkin's disease in young adults and multiple sclerosis may have related causes because the age of clinical onset and the geographic distribution of both are similar. This hypothesis was tested for data in Denmark. Detweeen 1943-62, the average annual incidence rate for Hoadgkin's disease in Denmark was 2.25 per 100,000 population (2.68 male and 1.83 female). Between 1951-69, the average annual death rate for Hodgkin's disease was 2.15 per 100,000 (2.66 male and 1.64 female). The average annual incidence rate for multiple sclerosis in Denmark was calculated from age at onset for 2,481 prevalent cases of 1949, the 1940 population, and an average annual incidence of 128.86 cases for 1939-45: the average annual incidence rate per 100,000 was then 3.35 (3.00 male and 3.69 female). Age specific incidence and death rate for Hodgkin's disease in Denmark each showed a bimodal curve, with one peak at age 25-29 and the other at age 70-74; this was found for each sex, with male rates consistently higher than female. The age specific incidence rates for multiple sclerosis were clearly unimodal with a peak at age 25-29 more definite in females than males. Rates for MS were notably higher for young females than males but about equal by sex for those over the age of 30. The geographic distribution of multiple sclerosis within the counties (amter) of Denmark was markedly non-random, with the major concentration of high prevalence areas middle Jutland and on to Fyn. Geographic distribution of Hodgkin's disease, whether for the young or the old, and whether from incident or death cases, showed no significant variation from a homogeneous distribution. In formal testing there was no correlation of any Hodgkin's distribution with that of MS. A review of the Hodgkin's data for distribution in the United States, on which the original hypothesis was based, suggests the variation there may be little more than reporting artifact. Accordingly, we conclude that there is no relation between distributions of these two disorders, and the factors they do appear to have in common are either quite non-specific or of questionable validity. Thus there is no reason to believe that multiple sclerosis and Hodgkin's disease, even in the young, share a common etiology.
PubMed ID
1266575 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.