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13C evidence for dietary habits of prehistoric man in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62404
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-1981
Author
H. Tauber
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Date
Jul-23-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - analysis
Carbon Isotopes
Collagen - analysis
Denmark
Diet
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
PubMed ID
7019718 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abstract profiles of structural stability point to universal tendencies, family-specific factors, and ancient connections between languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120224
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dan Dediu
Stephen C Levinson
Author Affiliation
Language and Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Dan.Dediu@mpi.nl
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Asia
Australia
Bayes Theorem
Cultural Evolution - history
Europe
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Language - history
Linguistics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Phylogeny
Siberia
Abstract
Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the "stability profiles" of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world.
Notes
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Erratum In: PLoS One.2012;7(10). doi: 10.1371/annotation/ceff8775-a4e3-45cb-b6c9-dd62d9179d59
PubMed ID
23028843 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activity-induced dental modification in holocene siberian hunter-fisher-gatherers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100395
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Oct;143(2):266-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Andrea Waters-Rist
Vladimir I Bazaliiskii
Andrzej Weber
Olga I Goriunova
M Anne Katzenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N-1N4. awaters@ucalgary.ca
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Oct;143(2):266-78
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia, Central
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Fossils
Geography
History, Ancient
Humans
Male
Mandible
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupations
Paleodontology
Sex Distribution
Siberia
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth - anatomy & histology
Tooth Attrition
Abstract
The use of teeth as tools provides clues to past subsistence patterns and cultural practices. Five Holocene period hunter-fisher-gatherer mortuary sites from the south-western region of Lake Baikal, Siberia, Russian Federation, are observed for activity-induced dental modification (AIDM) to further characterize their adaptive regimes. Grooves on the occlusal surfaces of teeth are observed in 25 out of 123 individuals (20.3%) and were most likely produced during the processing of fibers from plants and animals, for making items such as nets and cordage. Regional variation in the frequency of individuals with occlusal grooves is found in riverine versus lakeshore sites. This variation suggests that production of material culture items differed, perhaps in relation to different fishing practices. There is also variation in the distribution of grooves by sex: grooves are found predominately in females, except at the Late Neolithic-Bronze Age river site of Ust'-Ida I where grooves are found exclusively in males. Occlusal grooves were cast using polyvinylsiloxane and maxillary canine impressions were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine striation patterns. Variation in striae orientation suggests that a variety of activities, and/or different manufacturing techniques, were involved in groove production. Overall, the variability in occlusal groove frequency, sex and regional distribution, and microscopic striae patterns, points to the multiplicity of activities and ways in which people used their mouths and teeth in cultural activities.
PubMed ID
20853480 View in PubMed
Less detail

AG 85, a major secretion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can be identified in ancient bone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271332
Source
Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2015 Jun;95 Suppl 1:S87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Tyede H Schmidt-Schultz
Michael Schultz
Source
Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2015 Jun;95 Suppl 1:S87-92
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers - analysis
Blotting, Western
Case-Control Studies
Female
Germany
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Indoles - analysis
Male
Microscopy - methods
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Paleopathology - methods
Siberia
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - history
Young Adult
Abstract
For the confirmation of Ag 85 in ancient and recent ECM of native macerated human bone, five cases were investigated. In three individuals, highly positive results for Ag 85 were identified in Western blot: 1) a male from Arzhan, South Siberia, dating from the 7th century BC, 2) a male from Kirchberg in Hesse, Germany, dating from the 10th - 12th century AD and 3) a recent female with a proven diagnosis of TB. As a negative control, a recent male is presented who did not suffer from TB. In another recent male, Ag 85 could be identified only very weakly. From cases in the literature it is well-known that highly positive results for Ag 85 indicate active TB, however, weakly positive results indicate a silent initial infection with Mtb. Thus, apparently, also in ancient individuals, it might well be possible to differentiate between diseased persons and disease carriers using paleoproteomic techniques.
PubMed ID
25890594 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age determination of an Alaskan mummy: morphological and biochemical correlation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1587
Source
Science. 1978 Sep 1;201(4358):811-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1978
Author
Masters, P.M.
Zimmerman, M.R.
Author Affiliation
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Source
Science. 1978 Sep 1;201(4358):811-2
Date
Sep-1-1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Trauma
Age at death
Tattoos
Atherosclerosis
Aspartic Acid
Bicuspid
Female
History, Ancient
Humans
Middle Aged
Mummies
Paleodontology
Stereoisomerism
Abstract
Aspartic acid racemization analysis of a tooth from an Alaskan mummy yielded an age at death of 53 (+/- 5) years, which correlates well with earlier estimates based on morphological features. This study illustrates the value of integrative approaches to paleopathologic problems and the importance of preserving rare specimens for the application of new techniques.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 179.
Less detail

Ageing Cattle: The Use of Radiographic Examinations on Cattle Metapodials from Eketorp Ringfort on the Island of Öland in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273180
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ylva Telldahl
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137109
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Determination by Skeleton - methods
Agriculture - history - methods
Animal Husbandry - history - methods
Animals
Cattle - growth & development
Cattle Diseases - history - radiography
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - history - radiography - veterinary
Female
History, Ancient
Islands
Male
Meat
Metatarsal Bones - growth & development - radiography
Radiometric Dating
Sex Factors
Sweden
Waste Disposal Facilities
Abstract
In this paper conventional X-ray analysis of cattle metapodials is used to study the age structure of slaughtered cattle at Eketorp ringfort on the island of Öland, Sweden. The X-ray analyses suggest that several animals in both phases were slaughtered aged 4-8 years. More oxen/bulls than cows reached the advanced age of over 8 years, yet in phase III more oxen/bulls seem to have been slaughtered between the ages of 2 and 8 years. These differences may reflect a change in demand for meat related to the character of the site. The results also show a correlation between metapodials with a pathology connected to biomechanical stress and older animals. This suggests that male cattle were used both in meat production and as draught animals. Asymmetry in male metatarsals such as distal broadening of the lateral part of the medial trochlea was visible on the X-ray images. The bone element also indicates a denser outer cortex of the medial diaphysis in comparison to the inner medulla. This could be the result of repetitive mechanical stress. Two metatarsals from cows were documented with distal asymmetry indicating that cows were also used as working animals. Bone elements with changes in the articular surfaces were more common in metapodials from cows with an X-ray age of over 3-4 years. These results highlighted the slaughter age difference between oxen/bulls and cows, enabling a better understanding of animal husbandry and the selection of draught cattle at Eketorp ringfort.
Notes
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Cites: Br J Nutr. 1983 Nov;50(3):711-226639928
PubMed ID
26336086 View in PubMed
Less detail

The age pattern of fecundability: an analysis of French Canadian and Hutterite birth histories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193504
Source
Soc Biol. 2000 Spring-Summer;47(1-2):34-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Larsen
S. Yan
Author Affiliation
Department of Population and International Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Soc Biol. 2000 Spring-Summer;47(1-2):34-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Amenorrhea - history
Birth Intervals
Birth rate
Canada - epidemiology
Christianity - history
Emigration and Immigration - history
Female
Fertility
France - ethnology
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, Ancient
Humans
Infertility - ethnology - history
Linear Models
Marriage - history
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper analyzes the age pattern of effective fecundability from populations with no evidence of deliberate fertility control using a new convolution model of fecundability. The analysis is based on a sample of Hutterite birth histories from the mid-20th century, and birth histories of French Canadians from the 17th and 18th centuries. The main findings are as follows: 1) the level of effective fecundability is higher among the French Canadians compared to the Hutterites; 2) effective fecundability peaks at age 20 for the Hutterites, and in the early to mid-20s for the French Canadians; 3) Hutterite effective fecundability declines almost linearly from age 20 to 45, and French Canadian effective fecundability declines slowly from its peak to the early 30s, and more rapidly at older ages; and 4) the duration of postpartum amenorrhea is longer for the French Canadians than for the Hutterites. Because of the shorter periods of postpartum amenorrhea the Hutterites have about the same average number of children as the French Canadians, even though the French Canadians have higher effective fecundability.
PubMed ID
11521455 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol and alcoholism in historical and sociomedical perspective]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13102
Source
Sykepleien. 1978 Jun 20;65(10):608-13, 615
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1978

Alte volksmedizinische Gegenstände im Nationalmuseum von Reykjavik, Island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69262
Source
Medizinhist J. 1973;8(2-3):236-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

363 records – page 1 of 37.