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12th International Congress of Human Genetics. Life on the fertile frontier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129901
Source
Science. 2011 Nov 4;334(6056):582
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-4-2011

[200-year anniversary of the first Swedish vaccination. Difficult for Munck af Rosenschold to convince "the ignorant and stubborn county people"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57484
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1944-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2001

[250 years of the Department of Human Anatomy of the I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (1764-2014)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262449
Source
Morfologiia. 2014;146(5):88-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014

Abandoning "the other": statistical enumeration of Swedish Sami, 1700 to 1945 and beyond.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135562
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Centre for Sami Research, Umeå, Sweden. per.axelsson@cesam.umu.se
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses - history
Ethnic groups - history
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Dynamics
Population Groups - history
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden has one of the world's most eminent and exhaustive records of statistical information on its population. As early as the eighteenth century, ethnic notations were being made in parish registers throughout the country, and by the early nineteenth century a specific category for the Sami population had been added to the forms used to collect data for the Tabellverket (National Population Statistics). Beginning in 1860, the Sami were also counted in the first official census of the Swedish state. Nonetheless--and in contrast to many other countries--Sweden today lacks separate statistical information not only about its sole recognized indigenous population but also about other ethnic groups. The present paper investigates Sweden's attempts to enumerate its indigenous Sami population prior to World War II and the cessation of ethnic enumeration after the war. How have the Sami been identified and enumerated? How have statistical categories been constructed, and how have they changed over time? The aim of this essay is not to assess the validity of the demographic sources. Instead the paper will explore the historical, social, and cultural factors that have had a bearing on how a dominant administrative structure has dealt with the statistical construct of an indigenous population.
PubMed ID
21466142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal new world epidemiolgy and medical care, and the impact of Old World disease imports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6493
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1976 Nov;45(3 pt. 2):667-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1976
Author
M T Newman
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1976 Nov;45(3 pt. 2):667-72
Date
Nov-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - history
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - history
Infection - epidemiology
Morbidity
Population Growth
Abstract
Various workers, including T. D. Stewart, claim that the aboriginal Americas were relatively disease-free because of the bering Strait cold-screen, eliminating many pathogens, and the paucity of zoonotic infections because of few domestic animals. Evidence of varying validity suggests that precontact Americns had their own strains of treponemic infections, bacillary and amoebic dysenteries, influenza and viral penumonia and other respiratory diseases, salmonellosis and perhaps other food poisoning, various arthritides, some endoparasites such as the ascarids, and several geographically circumscribed diseases such as the rickettsial verruca (Carrion's disease) and New World leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis. Questionably aboriginal are tuberculosis and typhus. Accordingly, virtually all the "crowd-type" ecopathogenic diseases such as smallpox, yellow fever, typhoid, malaria, measles, pertussis, polio, etc., appear to have been absent from the New World, and were only brought in by White conquerors and their Black slaves. My hypothesis is that native American medical care systems--especially in the more culturally advanced areas--were sufficiently sophisticated to deal with native disease entities with reasonable competence. But native medical systems could not cope with the "crowd-type" disease imports that struck Indian and Eskimos as "virgin-field" populations. Reanalysis of native population losses through a genocidal combination of diease, war, slavery and attendant cultural disruption by Dobyns, Cook and others strongly suggest that traditiona estimates underplayed the death toll by a factor of the general order of ten. This would make for an immediately pre-contact Indian population of some 90-111 million instead of the tradition 8-11 million. Evidence is growing that Indians may have been no more susceptible to new pathogens that are other "virgin soil" populations, and thus their immune systems need not be considered less effective than those in other people. Present-day high mortality rates in Indians of both continents from infectious disease imports may be more socioeconomic than anything else.
PubMed ID
793420 View in PubMed
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Accelerated immunosenescence in preindustrial twin mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178937
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Aug 17;101(33):12391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-2004
Author
Samuli Helle
Virpi Lummaa
Jukka Jokela
Author Affiliation
Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014, Turku, Finland. samuli.helle@utu.fi
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Aug 17;101(33):12391-6
Date
Aug-17-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Industry - history
Infection - immunology - mortality
Longevity - immunology
Models, Immunological
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple - immunology
Reproduction - immunology
Time Factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - immunology - mortality
Abstract
Life-history theory predicts a tradeoff between reproductive effort and lifespan. It has been suggested that this tradeoff is a result of reproductive costs accelerating senescence of the immune system, leading to earlier death. Longevity costs of reproduction are suggested for some human populations, but whether high reproductive effort leads to impaired immune function is unknown. We examined how reproductive effort affected postreproductive survival and the probability of dying of an infectious disease in women born in preindustrial Finland between 1702 and 1859. We found that mothers delivering twins had reduced postreproductive survival after age 65. This effect arose because mothers of twins had a higher probability of succumbing to an infectious disease (mainly tuberculosis) than mothers delivering singletons. The risk among mothers of twins of dying of an infectious disease was further elevated if mothers had started reproducing early. In contrast, neither female postreproductive survival nor the risk of succumbing to an infectious disease was influenced by the total number of offspring produced. Our results provide evidence of a long-term survival cost of twinning in humans and indicate that the mechanism mediating this cost might have been accelerated immunosenescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15295101 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acceptance of van Swieten's liquor in Japan]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9759
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2002 Dec;48(4):575-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Fumi Takahashi
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2002 Dec;48(4):575-95
Date
Dec-2002
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohols - history
Austria
Commerce - history
English Abstract
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Japan
Mercury - history
Prescriptions, Drug - history
Sweden
Syphilis - history
Abstract
Carl Peter Thunberg, a Swedish medical doctor and botanist who visited Japan in 1775 as a medical doctor attached to the Dutch Trade House in Dejima, Nagasaki, taught the treatment of syphilis using mercury water to Japanese doctors and interpreters. This therapy is based on the oral administration of a 0.014% solution of mercuric chloride and was published in 1754 by Gerard van Swieten in Vienna, who questioned the utility of the conventional salivation therapy. The dose was set taking safety into account. Kogyu Yoshio, a Japanese-Dutch interpreter, had already read about it in a book written by J. J. Plenck, when he was taught about the therapy by Thunberg. He recorded Thunberg's teachings in his book "Komohijiki", presenting details of various formulations, including a high-dose formulation. The mercury therapy was subsequently spread across the country by medical doctors who learned Western medicine through the Dutch. In the 1820's, Genshin Udagawa, who read a number of Western medical books, published books on Western drugs. In these books, G. Udagawa included precise information on "Swieten Yakushu-hu (medicated alcohol)", including information on the dosage, formulation, mode of usage, and precautions for use. The maximum dose of mercuric chloride established chloride established by van Swieten was included in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia up to its 5th edition.
PubMed ID
12680425 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activities of the 1st health officers in Kuzbass]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43781
Source
Gig Sanit. 1971 Dec;36(12):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1971

581 records – page 1 of 59.