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12th International Congress of Human Genetics. Life on the fertile frontier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129901
Source
Science. 2011 Nov 4;334(6056):582
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-4-2011

The 1628 Vasa Inquest in Sweden: Learning Contemporary Lessons for Effective Death Investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301332
Source
J Law Med. 2018 Dec; 26(2):285-299
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Ian Freckelton
Author Affiliation
Barrister, Crockett Chambers, Melbourne; Professorial Fellow of Law, University of Melbourne; Adjunct Professor of Forensic Medicine, Monash University.
Source
J Law Med. 2018 Dec; 26(2):285-299
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Coroners and Medical Examiners - history
Death
History, 17th Century
Humans
Ships - history
Sweden
Abstract
Much that is constructive can be achieved from analysis of death investigations that have failed to achieve desirable outcomes in terms of learning lessons about risks to health and safety and in terms of gaining an understanding as to how further tragedies can be avoided. This article reviews an "inquest" into the sinking in 1628 of the pride of the Swedish Navy, the Vasa, and the factors that led to the inquest failing to come to grips with the various design, building, oversight, subcontracting, communication, and co-ordination flaws that contributed to the vessel being foreseeably unstable and thus unseaworthy. It argues that Reason's Swiss cheese analysis of systemic contributions to risk and modern principles of Anglo-Australasian-Canadian death investigation shed light on how a better investigation of the tragedy that cost 30 lives and a disastrous loss of a vessel of unparalleled cost to the Kingdom of Sweden could have led to more useful insights into the multifactorial causes of the sinking of the Vasa than were yielded by the inquest.
PubMed ID
30574717 View in PubMed
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Source
Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis. 2015 Dec;132(6):315-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
A. Werner
I. McGill
O. Laccourreye
Source
Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis. 2015 Dec;132(6):315-6
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anatomy - history
Catholicism - history
Denmark
History, 17th Century
PubMed ID
24924115 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal new world epidemiolgy and medical care, and the impact of Old World disease imports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6493
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1976 Nov;45(3 pt. 2):667-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1976
Author
M T Newman
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1976 Nov;45(3 pt. 2):667-72
Date
Nov-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - history
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - history
Infection - epidemiology
Morbidity
Population Growth
Abstract
Various workers, including T. D. Stewart, claim that the aboriginal Americas were relatively disease-free because of the bering Strait cold-screen, eliminating many pathogens, and the paucity of zoonotic infections because of few domestic animals. Evidence of varying validity suggests that precontact Americns had their own strains of treponemic infections, bacillary and amoebic dysenteries, influenza and viral penumonia and other respiratory diseases, salmonellosis and perhaps other food poisoning, various arthritides, some endoparasites such as the ascarids, and several geographically circumscribed diseases such as the rickettsial verruca (Carrion's disease) and New World leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis. Questionably aboriginal are tuberculosis and typhus. Accordingly, virtually all the "crowd-type" ecopathogenic diseases such as smallpox, yellow fever, typhoid, malaria, measles, pertussis, polio, etc., appear to have been absent from the New World, and were only brought in by White conquerors and their Black slaves. My hypothesis is that native American medical care systems--especially in the more culturally advanced areas--were sufficiently sophisticated to deal with native disease entities with reasonable competence. But native medical systems could not cope with the "crowd-type" disease imports that struck Indian and Eskimos as "virgin-field" populations. Reanalysis of native population losses through a genocidal combination of diease, war, slavery and attendant cultural disruption by Dobyns, Cook and others strongly suggest that traditiona estimates underplayed the death toll by a factor of the general order of ten. This would make for an immediately pre-contact Indian population of some 90-111 million instead of the tradition 8-11 million. Evidence is growing that Indians may have been no more susceptible to new pathogens that are other "virgin soil" populations, and thus their immune systems need not be considered less effective than those in other people. Present-day high mortality rates in Indians of both continents from infectious disease imports may be more socioeconomic than anything else.
PubMed ID
793420 View in PubMed
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Affinities between the 11th century Vivallen/Jämtland and Nordic and Saami groups based on tooth size and morphology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38693
Source
Pages 213-217 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Alexandersen, V
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Coppenhagen, Coppenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 213-217 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
Ethnic groups - history
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, Medieval
Humans
Odontometry
Paleodontology - history
Scandinavia
Tooth - anatomy & histology
PubMed ID
3078493 View in PubMed
Documents
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The age pattern of fecundability: an analysis of French Canadian and Hutterite birth histories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193504
Source
Soc Biol. 2000 Spring-Summer;47(1-2):34-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Larsen
S. Yan
Author Affiliation
Department of Population and International Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Soc Biol. 2000 Spring-Summer;47(1-2):34-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Amenorrhea - history
Birth Intervals
Birth rate
Canada - epidemiology
Christianity - history
Emigration and Immigration - history
Female
Fertility
France - ethnology
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, Ancient
Humans
Infertility - ethnology - history
Linear Models
Marriage - history
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper analyzes the age pattern of effective fecundability from populations with no evidence of deliberate fertility control using a new convolution model of fecundability. The analysis is based on a sample of Hutterite birth histories from the mid-20th century, and birth histories of French Canadians from the 17th and 18th centuries. The main findings are as follows: 1) the level of effective fecundability is higher among the French Canadians compared to the Hutterites; 2) effective fecundability peaks at age 20 for the Hutterites, and in the early to mid-20s for the French Canadians; 3) Hutterite effective fecundability declines almost linearly from age 20 to 45, and French Canadian effective fecundability declines slowly from its peak to the early 30s, and more rapidly at older ages; and 4) the duration of postpartum amenorrhea is longer for the French Canadians than for the Hutterites. Because of the shorter periods of postpartum amenorrhea the Hutterites have about the same average number of children as the French Canadians, even though the French Canadians have higher effective fecundability.
PubMed ID
11521455 View in PubMed
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[A historical birth tragedy. Neonatal infections still of interest today as they were 300 years ago]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37453
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Dec 10;110(30):3860-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1990
Author
R. Lindemann
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Dec 10;110(30):3860-2
Date
Dec-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - history - immunology
Bacterial Infections - history - immunology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - history - immunology - mortality
Listeria Infections - history - immunology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Abstract
Neonatal bacterial infections are still important causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity, as they were 300 years ago. Queen Anne (1655-1714) underwent 18 pregnancies without producing any successors, probably because the children died of perinatal infection. Some women are unable to produce a specific IgG-antibody against Group B streptococcus (GBS). They may have normal IgM production and are thereby self-protected, while their infants risk developing neonatal GBS septicaemia. Listeria monocytogenes may cause repeated miscarriages, stillbirths and neonatal infections and, even today, is an important cause of perinatal deaths. The miscarriages and neonatal deaths of Queen Anne are believed to have been caused by an asymptomatic listeria monocytogenes infection. The importance of recognizing women at risk for these types of infections is discussed.
PubMed ID
2281448 View in PubMed
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[Alcoholism in Russia: a history and current trends].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154664
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2007;Suppl 1:3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007

American Indian and Alaska native aboriginal use of alcohol in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11302
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1996;7(2):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
P J Abbott
Author Affiliation
Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions, Albuquerque, NM 87106, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1996;7(2):1-13
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - history
Alcoholic Beverages - history
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Indians, Central American - history
Indians, North American - history
Inuits - history
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol beverages prior to White contact originated with the Mayan and the Aztec Nations and spread to the American Indians of the Southwest. Surprisingly, there are a number of accounts of alcohol use among other American Indians and Alaska Natives. Beverages were limited to wine and beer, and included: balche, pulque, and "haren a pitahaya" wines, tulpi beer and other beverages. White contact brought dramatic shifts in the use and function of alcoholic beverages in American Indian and Alaska Native societies.
PubMed ID
8935245 View in PubMed
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269 records – page 1 of 27.