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The behaviour of ED1- and ED2-positive cells in the rat iris and choroid following penetrating keratoplasty and cyclosporin A therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51062
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 1996 Aug;234 Suppl 1:S149-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
L. Krause
S E Coupland
F. Hoffmann
Author Affiliation
Eye Department, Universitätsklinikum Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 1996 Aug;234 Suppl 1:S149-58
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cell Count
Choroid - immunology
Cyclosporine - therapeutic use
Dendritic Cells - immunology
Female
Graft Rejection - prevention & control
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Immunohistochemistry
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Iris - immunology
Keratoplasty, Penetrating
Macrophages - immunology
Monocytes - immunology
Random Allocation
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The presence, morphology and distribution of ED1 and ED2+ cells have been recently reported in detail in the uveal tissues of the rat. These cells, particularly those of dendritic morphology, are possibly capable of antigen presentation and, therefore, may play an important role in immune processes of uveal and other ocular tissues. Using the whole-mount technique, the distribution of ED1+ and ED2- cells in the rat iris and choroid was investigated following penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) and following treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA). METHODS: Lewis (LW) rats received corneal buttons from Lewis-Brown Norway (LW-BN) donors and were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (I) operated, untreated (n = 24); (II) operated, CsA treated (10 mg/kg i.m.: n = 22). Four groups served as controls: normal LW rats (n = 13); (IV) unoperated, CsA treated (16 days' treatment; n = 8); (V) eight corneal sutures only, representing a simulated or "sham" operation (n = 4); (VI) syngeneic operated (LW to LW: n = 4). Animals of groups I and II were killed on the 5th, 9th and 13th postoperative days and on appearance of the corneal rejection (group I, day 13; Group II, day 16). Both eyes were enucleated, immediately fixed, and iris-choroid flat mounts were examined for ED1+ and ED2+ cells using APAAP immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In the normal LW rat iris, ED1+ and ED2+ cells of both non-dendritic and dendritic morphology were observed. The placement of sutures in the cornea and PKP with or without treatment resulted in a reasonably regular response in both the iris and the choroid in the operated and partner eye. These included: (a) an increase in round iridal ED1+ and ED2+ cells in the operated eye and in round ED1+ cells in the partner eye; (b) a decrease in dendritiform ED2+ cells in the iris of the operated eyes as well as in the partner eye; and (c) a decrease in the dendritiform ED2+ cells in the choroid of the operated and partner eye. CsA treatment alone in unoperated animals resulted in significant decreases in the number of dendritiform ED1+ cells in the iris and in the dendritiform ED2+ cells in the choroid. CONCLUSION: Corneal transplantation in the Lewis rat results in responses in ED1+ and ED2+ cells in uveal tissues in both the operated eye as well as in the partner eye. The differences in cell behaviour supports the idea that distinct immune-competent cell populations are present within uveal tissues and that they may have differing roles in the pathological eye.
PubMed ID
8871167 View in PubMed
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Effects of the immunosuppressant FK506 on a penetrating keratoplasty rejection model in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51198
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 1993 Jul;34(8):2477-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
M. Nishi
C P Herbort
M. Matsubara
Y. Morishita
M. Nishimura
M. Nieda
S. Mori
M. Mochizuki
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, Brazil.
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 1993 Jul;34(8):2477-86
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cells, Cultured
Cornea - drug effects - immunology - pathology
Disease Models, Animal
Graft Rejection - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
Graft Survival - drug effects - immunology
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Keratoplasty, Penetrating - immunology - pathology
Lymphocyte Culture Test, Mixed
Male
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Rats, Inbred Lew
Receptors, Interleukin-2 - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tacrolimus - pharmacology
Transplantation, Homologous
Abstract
PURPOSE. The immunosuppressive effects of FK506 on allogeneic corneal transplantation were tested in a rat model. METHODS. Inbred-strain Lewis rats were used as recipients, and Fisher rats were used as donors. Intraperitoneal injection of FK506 (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg per day) was administered for 2 weeks, and the grafts were inspected by clinical evaluation. Mixed lymphocyte culture assay, using lymphocytes from recipients of penetrating keratoplasty as responder cells and irradiated splenocytes from naive Fisher or Brown Norway as stimulator cells, was used to identify allogeneic stimulation. The rejection process was studied by histology and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS. The rat strain combination developed 100% graft rejection in about 2 weeks after the penetrating keratoplasty. FK506 prolonged the graft survival in a dose-dependent manner, as observed by clinical evaluation. In mixed lymphocyte culture assay, Lewis rats that had been primed to allogeneic stimulation at the time of cornea transplantation presented significant proliferation to Fisher stimulator splenocytes. FK506 suppressed this primed lymphocyte proliferation. Immunohistochemical and histologic studies confirmed the clinical evaluations. Untreated rat corneas, at the second postoperative week, presented a large number of helper/inducer T cells, macrophages, IL-2 receptor-expressing cells, and Ia-antigen-expressing cells. In the same period, FK506-treated rats appeared normal and had no cellular infiltration. Corneas rejected after FK506 cessation had less intense cell infiltration than the control corneas. CONCLUSIONS. These data indicate that FK506 prolonged the corneal graft survival and can be a potentially useful drug in the immunotherapeutic arsenal to suppress corneal graft rejection.
PubMed ID
7686893 View in PubMed
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Endotoxin-induced uveitis in the rat. The significance of intraocular interleukin-6.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51239
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 1992 Mar;33(3):532-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
R. Hoekzema
C. Verhagen
M. van Haren
A. Kijlstra
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmo-Immunology, Netherlands Ophthalmic Research Institute, Amsterdam.
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 1992 Mar;33(3):532-9
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anterior Chamber - immunology - pathology
Aqueous Humor - chemistry - immunology
Comparative Study
Endotoxins
Eye Proteins - analysis
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Injections
Interleukin-6 - analysis - immunology
Male
Neutrophils - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Recombinant Proteins
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retina - immunology - pathology
Salmonella
Uveitis, Anterior - immunology - pathology
Abstract
The potential role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) was studied as an inflammatory mediator of endotoxin (or lipopolysaccharide [LPS])-induced uveitis (EIU) in the rat. In young Lewis rats, levels of intraocular IL-6, but not serum IL-6, correlated with the severity of uveitis and with aqueous humor protein levels in response to foot pad injections of LPS (P less than 0.001). Adult Lewis rats did not develop uveitis and had no intraocular IL-6, although IL-6 was released systemically. Resistance to EIU and absence of IL-6 levels in the aqueous humor, despite the ability to release serum IL-6, also were observed in brown Norway rats, irrespective of age and weight. Intravitreal injection of as little as 1 ng of human recombinant IL-6 induced uveitis in young Lewis rats. In adult Lewis rats, and in young animals made tolerant to LPS, intravitreal IL-6 still caused substantial leakage of plasma proteins into the anterior chamber but no influx of inflammatory cells. As early as 2 hr after intravitreal injection of IL-6, immunohistochemical analysis showed invasion of the iris, corneal stroma, and anterior chamber by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen in the retina by large cells that were macrophage-marker ED2 negative. This was followed by massive PMN infiltration of the retinal layers and vitreous. The MHC class II antigen expression of ciliary and iris epithelium occurred at a later stage (greater than 8 hr).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1544781 View in PubMed
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Genetic, autoimmune, and clinical characteristics of childhood- and adult-onset type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32598
Source
Diabetes Care. 2000 Sep;23(9):1326-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
E. Sabbah
K. Savola
T. Ebeling
P. Kulmala
P. Vähäsalo
J. Ilonen
P I Salmela
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2000 Sep;23(9):1326-32
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Alleles
Autoantibodies - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body Weight
C-Peptide - blood
Child
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics - immunology - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess whether there are any differences in genetic, autoimmune, or clinical features between type 1 diabetes presenting in childhood and that diagnosed later. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied 352 individuals (252 children and adolescents or =20 years of age) manifesting clinical signs of type 1 diabetes over a period of 7.5 years at a university hospital in northern Finland with a primary catchment area population of approximately 300,000. The patients were analyzed for susceptible and protective HLA-DQB1 alleles (*02, *0302, *0301, *0602, *0603, and *0604), islet cell antibodies (ICA), insulin autoantibodies, and antibodies to GAD and IA-2 (IA-2A). Their clinical symptoms and signs were recorded at diagnosis. RESULTS: The adult patients carried the high-risk DQB1*02/0302 genotype less frequently than the children and more often had protective genotypes. They also had a decreased frequency of all 4 single autoantibody specificities and of multiple (> or =3) autoantibodies. The proportion of patients testing negative for all autoantibodies was lower among the children than among the adults. IA-2A were associated with the DQB1*0302/x genotype in both the children and adults, and the same held true for ICA among the adults. The adults were characterized by a higher proportion of males, a longer duration of symptoms, and a lower frequency of infections during the preceding 3 months. In addition, they had a higher relative body weight on admission and milder signs of metabolic decompensation (higher pH, base excess, and bicarbonate concentrations) and a lower glycated hemoglobin level at diagnosis than the children. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical manifestation of type 1 diabetes before the age of 20 years is associated with a strong HLA-defined genetic disease susceptibility, an intensive humoral immune response to various beta-cell antigens, a higher frequency of preceding infections, and a shorter duration of symptoms and more severe metabolic decompensation at diagnosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that the age at clinical onset of type 1 diabetes is determined by the intensity of the beta-cell-destructive process, which is modulated by both genetic and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10977027 View in PubMed
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Induction of alloantigen-specific cytotoxic and suppressor activities of lymphocytes by intravenous immunization of mice when donor and recipient differ in class II MHC molecule.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57719
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1993 Sep-Oct;55(5):51-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Kronin
N G Anosova
B D Brondz
A D Chernysheva
Y S Krivoshein
I A Popov
Author Affiliation
Crimean Medical Institute, Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine, Simferopol.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1993 Sep-Oct;55(5):51-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Comparative Study
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic - immunology
Epitopes - immunology
Graft Rejection - immunology
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Immune Tolerance - immunology
Immunization - methods
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Isoantigens - immunology
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Inbred DBA
Skin Transplantation - immunology
Spleen - immunology - radiation effects
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Transplantation, Isogeneic
Abstract
Induction of alloantigen-specific cytotoxic and suppressor activities of lymphocytes was studied upon intravenous immunization of recipients C57Bl/6 with B6.C-H-2bm12 donor's splenocytes irradiated with 2000 rads and introduced in a dose of 9 x 10(7). A possibility was shown to induce a specific cytotoxic and suppressor activities may be induced individually. We studied a possibility to detect the suppressor activity of immune splenocytes in the reaction of skin graft rejection. No significant prolongation of the B6.C-H-2bm12 skin graft life was noted in C57Bl/6 recipients, irradiated with 2000 rads, under the action of adoptive transfer of the immune syngenic splenocytes in comparison with the grafts life in recipients received the adoptive transfer of intact splenocytes.
PubMed ID
7512873 View in PubMed
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The influence of HLA-DR match on the outcome of cadaver renal transplantation in Stockholm during 1977-1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48943
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1981 Nov;18(5):316-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981
Author
B. Berg
E. Möller
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1981 Nov;18(5):316-25
Date
Nov-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Graft Survival
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The influence of HLA-DR match grade on graft and on patient survival was analyzed in 124 recipients of cadaver kidneys who were treated in Stockholm between January 1977 and September 1980. The material consisted of 72 males and 52 females, with a mean age of 49 years. There were 34 re-transplantations. Eighteen of the recipients had diabetes. Sera against the HLA-DR antigens 1-4, 7 and DRw8 were available throughout. During recent years, DR5 sera were also used. The case material was analyzed as to the number of DR antigens shared or to the number of DR incompatibilities between the donor and the recipient. A significant improvement in graft survival rate was found for transplants sharing one HLA-DR antigen as compared with those sharing none. As far as incompatibilities are concerned, a significant difference was found between transplants with no incompatibilities and those with two. The HLA-A, B incompatibilities were evenly distributed throughout the various groups and thus should not have introduced a bias in the interpretation of the influence of HLA-DR match. We conclude that HLA-DR matching has a very beneficial effect on the graft survival rate and we shall in future try to obtain the best possible match when selecting recipients for cadaver kidney transplantation.
PubMed ID
7046134 View in PubMed
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Linkage disequilibrium between HLA class II region and autoimmune hepatitis in pediatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179992
Source
J Hepatol. 2004 Jun;40(6):904-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Idriss Djilali-Saiah
Reginald Renous
Sophie Caillat-Zucman
Dominique Debray
Fernando Alvarez
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterology Division, Hôpital Sainte-Justine, 3175, Côte Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Que., Canada. isaiah@justine.umontreal.ca
Source
J Hepatol. 2004 Jun;40(6):904-9
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Exons
Female
France
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Hepatitis, Autoimmune - genetics - immunology
Heterozygote
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Polymorphism, Genetic
Abstract
Susceptibility HLA class II alleles associated with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) were only described in case-control studies.
The transmission/disequilibrium test was used in 50 simplex families with AIH, to determine if affected offspring received the disease-associated allele more frequently than its alternate. HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 allele genotyping and autoimmune regulator (AIRE) polymorphisms located in exons 6, 8 and 10 were investigated by PCR-based methods.
HLA-DRB1*03 allele was significantly transmitted from heterozygous parent to affected offspring (81.5%) with type 1 AIH compared to random expected frequency (50.0%; P=0.004) or to unaffected offspring (42.8%; P=0.03). HLA-DRB1*1301 allele showed an excess transmission to affected children (100%) than expected frequency (P
PubMed ID
15158329 View in PubMed
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Long-term renal allograft survival in rats preimmunized with donor strain RT1.B antigens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57882
Source
Transplantation. 1983 Apr;35(4):289-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
A. Kaldany
K. George
M. Suthanthiran
G R Catto
T B Strom
C B Carpenter
Source
Transplantation. 1983 Apr;35(4):289-93
Date
Apr-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity
Antigens, Surface - immunology
Cell Membrane - immunology
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic
Graft Survival
Hemagglutinins
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Immunization
Isoantibodies - biosynthesis
Kidney Transplantation
Lymphocyte Culture Test, Mixed
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
Rat renal allograft survival was enhanced by active immunization with donor strain RT1.B (Ia) antigens. Lewis (LEW) rats (16) were immunized with Brown Norway (BN) lymphocyte extracts containing RT1.B, but not RT1.A antigens, prior to receiving (LEW X BN)F1 renal allografts. Group 1 (8 rats) was immunized with lymphocyte membrane fragments group 2(8 rats) was primed with lymphocyte supernatant extract. Longterm survivors (greater than 60 days; 12 animals) had a mean blood urea nitrogen of 75 +/- 31 mg% and serum creatinine of 2.0 +/- 0.8 mg% at one month. Death occurred in 90% of control allograft recipients within 10 days. Anti-BN RT1.B but not RT1.A antibodies were detected in sera from actively enhanced rats following immunization and at day 7 posttransplantation. We conclude that preimmunization with cell extracts containing donor RT1.B antigens has a protective effect on the allograft, and that the phenomenon of active immunologic enhancement can be produced without immunization to RT1.A antigens.
PubMed ID
6220493 View in PubMed
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Mercury-induced autoreactive anti-class II T cell line protects from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by the bias of CD8+ antiergotypic cells in Lewis rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46583
Source
J Exp Med. 1993 Apr 1;177(4):881-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1993
Author
M. Castedo
L. Pelletier
J. Rossert
R. Pasquier
H. Villarroya
P. Druet
Author Affiliation
INSERM U28, Hôpital Broussais, Paris, France.
Source
J Exp Med. 1993 Apr 1;177(4):881-9
Date
Apr-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, CD8
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced - immunology - prevention & control
B-Lymphocytes - immunology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Cell Division
Cells, Cultured
Encephalitis - chemically induced - immunology - prevention & control
Female
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Male
Mercuric Chloride
Rats
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - cytology - immunology
Abstract
Brown-Norway (BN) rats injected with HgCl2 develop a systemic autoimmune disease associated with a polyclonal B cell activation, due to autoreactive T cells specific for self-class II molecules, while Lewis (LEW) rats injected with HgCl2 do not exhibit autoimmunity and develop a non-antigen-specific, CD8-mediated immunosuppression assessed by a depression of T cell functions, and a protection against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Resistance to HgCl2-induced autoimmunity is not due to these suppressor cells since treatment with an anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) did not allow autoimmunity to appear. The absence of autoimmunity in this strain could result from the absence of autoreactive T cells, or from quantitative or qualitative differences of these cells between susceptible and resistant strains. In the present study, we show that CD4+ anti-class II T cells are present in HgCl2-injected LEW rats and are as frequent as in BN rats when assessed by limiting dilution analysis. LEW CD4+ autoreactive T cell lines were derived. They proliferated in the presence of normal class II-bearing cells, secreted interleukin 2, and did not induce B cells to produce immunoglobulins. Transfer of one of these lines, LEW Hg A, into normal LEW rats led to the appearance of CD8+ cells responsible for a non-antigen-specific immunosuppression that induced complete protection from EAE. Immunosuppression was abrogated after treatment with an anti-CD8 mAb. In vitro, CD8+ cells from rats injected with the LEW Hg A T cell line proliferated in the presence of activated T cells whatever their origin. We conclude that HgCl2 induces CD4+ autoreactive T cells that proliferate in the presence of class II+ cells in susceptible BN as well as in resistant LEW rats. But while these cells collaborate with B cells to produce autoantibodies in BN rats, they initiate in LEW rats a suppressor circuit involving antiergotypic CD8+ suppressor cells.
PubMed ID
8096239 View in PubMed
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Phenotypic and functional characterization of CD8+ T lymphocytes from the central nervous system of rats with coronavirus JHM induced demyelinating encephalomyelitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22979
Source
J Neurovirol. 1995 Dec;1(5-6):340-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
A. Hein
S. Schwender
H. Imrich
S. Sopper
M. Czub
R. Dörries
Author Affiliation
Institut für Virologie und Immunbiologie, University of Würzburg, Germany.
Source
J Neurovirol. 1995 Dec;1(5-6):340-8
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Brain - cytology - immunology - virology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - cytology - virology
Coronavirus Infections - immunology - virology
Demyelinating Diseases - immunology - virology
Encephalitis, Viral - immunology - virology
Flow Cytometry
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I - immunology
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - immunology
Multiple Myeloma
Murine hepatitis virus - immunology
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Spleen - cytology
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic - immunology - virology
Tumor Cells, Cultured - virology
Abstract
Intracerebral infection of Lewis (LEW) inbred rats with the neurotropic strain of the murine coronavirus JHM (JHMV) frequently results in a monophasic paralytic disease. In contrast, infection of Brown Norway (BN) inbred rats does not lead to clinical disease. Previous findings indicated that in both rat strains brain-infiltrating leukocytes consisted mainly of CD8+ T lymphocytes. Here, we phenotypically as well as functionally characterised this T cell subset after isolation from the central nervous system (CNS). Using JHMV-infected target cells, MHC class I restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocytes were demonstrated to be present in the leukocyte fraction from the CNS of both, susceptible LEW and disease-resistant BN rats. However, compared to infected, but healthy BN rats, diseased LEW rats generated an enhanced cytotoxic immune response which became most prominent at the maximum of neurological disease. Recently published observations from our laboratory demonstrated a strong virus-specific antibody response in the CNS of BN rats. In LEW rats, however, the response was delayed and of low magnitude. This suggests, that consequences of cytotoxic T lymphocyte action in JHMV-infected CNS tissue largely depend on the efficacy of an accompanying virus-specific humoral immune response.
Notes
Comment In: J Neurovirol. 1995 Dec;1(5-6):323-59222372
PubMed ID
9222376 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.