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Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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Admixture mapping identifies a locus on 6q25 associated with breast cancer risk in US Latinas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128155
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2012 Apr 15;21(8):1907-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2012
Author
Laura Fejerman
Gary K Chen
Celeste Eng
Scott Huntsman
Donglei Hu
Amy Williams
Bogdan Pasaniuc
Esther M John
Marc Via
Christopher Gignoux
Sue Ingles
Kristine R Monroe
Laurence N Kolonel
Gabriela Torres-Mejía
Eliseo J Pérez-Stable
Esteban González Burchard
Brian E Henderson
Christopher A Haiman
Elad Ziv
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Institute for Human Genetics and Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2012 Apr 15;21(8):1907-17
Date
Apr-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - classification - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11 - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6 - genetics
Estrogen Receptor alpha - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Loci
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Hispanic Americans - genetics
Humans
Microfilament Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Abstract
Among US Latinas and Mexican women, those with higher European ancestry have increased risk of breast cancer. We combined an admixture mapping and genome-wide association mapping approach to search for genomic regions that may explain this observation. Latina women with breast cancer (n= 1497) and Latina controls (n= 1272) were genotyped using Affymetrix and Illumina arrays. We inferred locus-specific genetic ancestry and compared the ancestry between cases and controls. We also performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association analyses in regions of interest. Correction for multiple-hypothesis testing was conducted using permutations (P(corrected)). We identified one region where genetic ancestry was significantly associated with breast cancer risk: 6q25 [odds ratio (OR) per Indigenous American chromosome 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65-0.85, P= 1.1 × 10(-5), P(corrected)= 0.02]. A second region on 11p15 showed a trend towards association (OR per Indigenous American chromosome 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68-0.87, P= 4.3 × 10(-5), P(corrected)= 0.08). In both regions, breast cancer risk decreased with higher Indigenous American ancestry in concordance with observations made on global ancestry. The peak of the 6q25 signal includes the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene and 5' region, a locus previously implicated in breast cancer. Genome-wide association analysis found that a multi-SNP model explained the admixture signal in both regions. Our results confirm that the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer risk in US Latinas is partly due to genetic differences between populations of European and Indigenous Americans origin. Fine-mapping within the 6q25 and possibly the 11p15 loci will lead to the discovery of the biologically functional variant/s behind this association.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22228098 View in PubMed
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America's Churning Races: Race and Ethnicity Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286886
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Carolyn A Liebler
Sonya R Porter
Leticia E Fernandez
James M Noon
Sharon R Ennis
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Censuses
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
A person's racial or ethnic self-identification can change over time and across contexts, which is a component of population change not usually considered in studies that use race and ethnicity as variables. To facilitate incorporation of this aspect of population change, we show patterns and directions of individual-level race and Hispanic response change throughout the United States and among all federally recognized race/ethnic groups. We use internal U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses in which responses have been linked at the individual level (N = 162 million). Approximately 9.8 million people (6.1 %) in our data have a different race and/or Hispanic-origin response in 2010 than they did in 2000. Race response change was especially common among those reported as American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander, in a multiple-race response group, or Hispanic. People reported as non-Hispanic white, black, or Asian in 2000 usually had the same response in 2010 (3 %, 6 %, and 9 % of responses changed, respectively). Hispanic/non-Hispanic ethnicity responses were also usually consistent (13 % and 1 %, respectively, changed). We found a variety of response change patterns, which we detail. In many race/Hispanic response groups, we see population churn in the form of large countervailing flows of response changes that are hidden in cross-sectional data. We find that response changes happen across ages, sexes, regions, and response modes, with interesting variation across racial/ethnic categories. Researchers should address the implications of race and Hispanic-origin response change when designing analyses and interpreting results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28105578 View in PubMed
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Ancestral components of admixed genomes in a Mexican cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128519
Source
PLoS Genet. 2011 Dec;7(12):e1002410
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Nicholas A Johnson
Marc A Coram
Mark D Shriver
Isabelle Romieu
Gregory S Barsh
Stephanie J London
Hua Tang
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.
Source
PLoS Genet. 2011 Dec;7(12):e1002410
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - genetics
African Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Cohort Studies
Demography
Ethnic Groups - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Evolution, Molecular
Genome, Human
Haplotypes - genetics
Hispanic Americans - genetics
Humans
Mexico
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Population - genetics
Principal Component Analysis
Selection, Genetic
Abstract
For most of the world, human genome structure at a population level is shaped by interplay between ancient geographic isolation and more recent demographic shifts, factors that are captured by the concepts of biogeographic ancestry and admixture, respectively. The ancestry of non-admixed individuals can often be traced to a specific population in a precise region, but current approaches for studying admixed individuals generally yield coarse information in which genome ancestry proportions are identified according to continent of origin. Here we introduce a new analytic strategy for this problem that allows fine-grained characterization of admixed individuals with respect to both geographic and genomic coordinates. Ancestry segments from different continents, identified with a probabilistic model, are used to construct and study "virtual genomes" of admixed individuals. We apply this approach to a cohort of 492 parent-offspring trios from Mexico City. The relative contributions from the three continental-level ancestral populations-Africa, Europe, and America-vary substantially between individuals, and the distribution of haplotype block length suggests an admixing time of 10-15 generations. The European and Indigenous American virtual genomes of each Mexican individual can be traced to precise regions within each continent, and they reveal a gradient of Amerindian ancestry between indigenous people of southwestern Mexico and Mayans of the Yucatan Peninsula. This contrasts sharply with the African roots of African Americans, which have been characterized by a uniform mixing of multiple West African populations. We also use the virtual European and Indigenous American genomes to search for the signatures of selection in the ancestral populations, and we identify previously known targets of selection in other populations, as well as new candidate loci. The ability to infer precise ancestral components of admixed genomes will facilitate studies of disease-related phenotypes and will allow new insight into the adaptive and demographic history of indigenous people.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22194699 View in PubMed
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An examination of cancer risk beliefs among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian and Spanish-speaking communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190520
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judy A Paisley
Jess Haines
Marlene Greenberg
Mary-Jo Makarchuk
Sarah Vogelzang
Krystyna Lewicki
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3. j2paisle@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Culture
Disease Susceptibility - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - standards
Health education
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology - psychology
Ontario
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Spain - ethnology
Abstract
Canada's growing ethnocultural diversity challenges health professionals to develop culturally sensitive cancer prevention strategies. Little is known about the ethnocultural specificity of cancer risk beliefs. This qualitative pilot study examined cancer risk beliefs, focusing on diet, among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian, and Spanish-speaking communities.
Group interviews (n = 4) were conducted with convenience samples of adults (total n = 45) from four ethnocultural communities (total 45 participants).
The constant comparison method of data analysis identified three common themes: knowledge of cancer risk factors, concern about the food supply, and the roles of spiritual and emotional well-being. Two areas of contrasting belief concerning specific mediators of cancer risk were identified.
Findings support the investigation of cultural-specific health promotion strategies emphasizing both the maintenance of traditional cancer protective eating practices and the adoption of additional healthy eating practices among new Canadians. More research is needed to enhance our understanding of ethnoculturally specific cancer risk beliefs and practices to ensure the cultural relevance of programming.
PubMed ID
11963519 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Armed conflict and trauma: a clinical study of Latin-American refugee children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230662
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Jun;34(5):376-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
C. Rousseau
E. Corin
C. Renaud
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche psychosociale, Centre de recherche de l'hôpital Douglas, Verdun, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Jun;34(5):376-85
Date
Jun-1989
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Child
Chile - ethnology
Combat Disorders - psychology
El Salvador - ethnology
Extraversion (Psychology)
Family
Female
Guatemala - ethnology
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Introversion (Psychology)
Male
Personality Development
Quebec
Refugees - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Violence
Abstract
This exploratory research on psychic consequences of armed conflicts has been carried out in Montreal on 30 latin-americans, eight to 12 year-old refugees. The principal objective was to assert the importance of traumas intensity, accumulation and age of occurrence on the level and type of symptomatology (introversion-extroversion). Using two types of methodologies, clinical scales and in a more exploratory way, projective instruments to study the intra-psychic dynamic underlying the symptomatology observed. The children were classified according to trauma intensity and for this purpose, a trauma scale was defined with latin-american informants. ACHENBACH and DOMINIQUE clinical evaluation scales were applied to the measure of clinical symptomatology. These instruments were analysed as a function of the symptoms intensity and type. Among results, the accumulation and intensity of traumas were found to be in significant correlation with anxio-depressive symptoms, as reported by the children with interiorization symptoms in ACHENBACH. The predominance of interiorization is discussed. The analysis of the TAT, based on objective indicators, brought out a light frequency of violent themes in relations with the clinical symptomatology. This research indicates the relevance of projective instruments to the study of traumatic response.
PubMed ID
2766190 View in PubMed
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Assessing pesticide safety knowledge among Hispanic migrant farmworkers in Oregon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178108
Source
J Agric Saf Health. 2004 Aug;10(3):177-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
L A McCauley
S E Shapiro
J A Scherer
M R Lasarev
Author Affiliation
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, 420 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6096, USA. lmccaule@nursing.upenn.edu
Source
J Agric Saf Health. 2004 Aug;10(3):177-86
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Male
Mexico - ethnology
Occupational Health
Oregon
Pesticides - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Transients and Migrants
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to report on the development and initial use of a pesticide knowledge test (PKT) specifically designed to evaluate agricultural workers' knowledge of the content mandated by the federal Worker Protection Standard (WPS). The PKT is a 20-item, true-false test, used in a sample of 414 adult and adolescent migrant farmworkers in Oregon. The overall mean score, i.e., number correct, was 15.67(78.4%), with both adults and adolescents demonstrating the most difficulty with questions related to the overall health effects of pesticides. The internal consistency was 0.73, when estimated using a method to correct for small sample sizes. Only six items had less than 70% correct answers. Content validity was achieved by basing the items directly on the Worker Protection Standard; face validity was obtained by having the final version of the test reviewed by a bilingual (English-Spanish) educator familiar with the requirements of the WPS. Overall, adult participants scored better than adolescents, and those with previous pesticide training scored better than those without. There were no differences in scores based on gender or whether the test was taken in English or Spanish; however, participants who spoke indigenous languages scored significantly lower than those who did not. These results indicate that the PKT is a valid, reliable measure of worker knowledge of the content of the WPS, although it does not measure the extent to which that knowledge is actually used in the work setting.
PubMed ID
15461134 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing reading level of drug users for HIV and AIDS prevention purposes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3025
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 1996 Aug;8(4):323-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
M E Johnson
D G Fisher
D C Davis
H H Cagle
F. Rhodes
R. Booth
H. Siegal
A. Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska at Anchorage, Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 1996 Aug;8(4):323-34
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans
Aged
Educational Status
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reading
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
United States
Abstract
Using the short form of the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised and the reading subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised, the reading abilities of 284 male and 128 female drug users from five sites across the United States were evaluated. All subjects were participants in a National Institute on Drug Abuse HIV/AIDS prevention project aimed at intravenous drug users and cocaine smokers. Results revealed differences in reading abilities among ethnic groups with Native and white subjects having significantly higher reading levels than Hispanic and black subjects. Significant site differences were revealed, with mean grade equivalent scores ranging from 2.7 to 10.1 grades. Across all subjects, the average grade equivalent reading level was 5.8 to 7.7, indicating that the subjects read below the level of 81.5% to 93% of the general population. We provide implications for development of educational materials that are accessible for this population.
PubMed ID
8874649 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity and eczema prevalence, severity and poorer health in US adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261341
Source
Dermatitis. 2014 Jul-Aug;25(4):172-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jonathan I Silverberg
Eric L Simpson
Source
Dermatitis. 2014 Jul-Aug;25(4):172-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Body mass index
Child
Eczema - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health status
Health Surveys
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of eczema is of major public health significance.
This study aimed to determine the effects of obesity in adolescence on the prevalence, severity, and quality of life of patients with eczema.
We used the 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health, including a nationally representative sample of 45,897 adolescents aged 10 to 17 years. Caregiver report of eczema, health status, height, weight, number of health conditions, use of health services, and sociodemographics were assessed.
The prevalences of overweight (20.3% vs 15.4%) and obesity (16.8% vs 15.4%) were increased in adolescents with eczema compared with adolescents without eczema (Rao-Scott ?, P
PubMed ID
25000233 View in PubMed
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The association between race/ethnicity and the effectiveness of direct antiviral agents for hepatitis C virus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284948
Source
Hepatology. 2017 Feb;65(2):426-438
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Feng Su
Pamela K Green
Kristin Berry
George N Ioannou
Source
Hepatology. 2017 Feb;65(2):426-438
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hepacivirus - drug effects - genetics
Hepatitis C - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology - mortality
Hepatitis C, Chronic - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interferon-alpha - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Risk assessment
Simeprevir - therapeutic use
Sofosbuvir - therapeutic use
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with lower rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) to interferon-based treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus infection, whereas Asian race was associated with higher SVR rates compared to white patients. We aimed to describe the association between race/ethnicity and effectiveness of new direct-acting antiviral regimens in the Veterans Affairs health care system nationally. We identified 21,095 hepatitis C virus-infected patients (11,029 [52%] white, 6,171 [29%] black, 1,187 [6%] Hispanic, 348 [2%] Asian/Pacific Islander/American Indian/Alaska Native, and 2,360 [11%] declined/missing race or ethnicity) who initiated antiviral treatment with regimens containing sofosbuvir, simeprevir + sofosbuvir, ledipasvir/sofosbuvir, or paritaprevir/ombitasvir/ritonavir/dasabuvir during the 18-month period from January 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. Overall SVR rates were 89.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 89.2-90.4) in white, 89.8% (95% CI 89.0-90.6) in black, 86.0% (95% CI 83.7-88.0) in Hispanic, and 90.7% (95% CI 87.0-93.5) in Asian/Pacific Islander/American Indian/Alaska Native patients. However, after adjustment for baseline characteristics, black (adjusted odds ratio = 0.77, P
PubMed ID
27775854 View in PubMed
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