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The annual number of hip fractures in Sweden will double from year 2002 to 2050: projections based on local and nationwide data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256756
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Jun;85(3):234-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Björn E Rosengren
Magnus K Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences and Orthopedics , Malmö University Hospital, Lund University , Sweden .
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Jun;85(3):234-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Forecasting
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence and annual number of hip fractures have increased worldwide during the past 50 years, and projections have indicated a further increase. During the last decade, however, a down-turn in the incidence of hip fracture has been seen in the western world. We predicted the development of hip fractures in Sweden until the year 2050.
We reviewed surgical records for the period 2002-2012 in the city of Malmö, Sweden, and identified patients aged 50 years or more with a hip fracture. We estimated incidence rates by using official population figures as denominator and applied the rates to population projections each year until 2050. We also made projections based on our previously published nationwide Swedish hip fracture rates for the period 1987-2002. Since the projections are based on estimates, no confidence limits are given.
During the period 2002-2012, there were 7,385 hip fractures in Malmö. Based on these data, we predicted that there would be approximately 30,000 hip fractures in Sweden in the year 2050. Use of nationwide rates for 2002 in the predictive model gave similar results, which correspond to an increase in the number of hip fractures by a factor of 1.9 (1.7 for women and 2.3 for men) compared to 2002.
The annual number of hip fractures will almost double during the first half of the century. Time trends in hip fractures and also changes in population size and age distribution should be continuously monitored, as such changes will influence the number of hip fractures in the future. Our results indicate that we must optimize preventive measures for hip fractures and prepare for major demands in resources.
Notes
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2002 Jan;13(1):18-2511878451
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1987 Sep;(222):132-93621713
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 1992 Nov;2(6):285-91421796
Cites: Bone. 1993;14 Suppl 1:S23-98110516
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 1997;7(5):407-139425497
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2013 Mar;35(1):125-3122753444
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Mar 6;353(9155):802-510459962
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Dec;21(12):1836-817002578
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Mar;18(3):333-717077942
Cites: Epidemiology. 2012 Jul;23(4):623-3022531666
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1999 Feb;70(1):19-2210191741
PubMed ID
24786906 View in PubMed
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The challenges of interpreting efficacy of hip protector pads in fracture prevention in high-risk seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152429
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;28(6):723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Angela G Juby
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Medicine, University of Alberta, B139C Clinical Sciences Building, 8440 112 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2B7, Canada. angela.juby@capitalhealth.ca
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;28(6):723-7
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Protective Devices
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Efficacy of hip protector pads to prevent hip fracture is controversial. This study was done to evaluate two comparable groups for fracture risk. Two matched cohorts of long-term care residents in Canada, assessing the efficacy of hip protector pads. Evaluation included demographics, medications/diagnoses, cognition (Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE)), balance (Berg), bone mineral density (calcaneal ultrasound), falls/injuries at baseline and completion. Of the 58 participants, there were two confirmed hip fractures (8%) in the hip pad (one while wearing the pad) and eight (24%) in the control groups. But baseline demographics showed significant differences between hip pad (25) and control groups (33) in MMSE, Berg and osteoporosis treatment, all being less in the hip pad group. This persisted at completion, with a higher mortality in the hip pad group. Baseline differences predisposed the hip pad group to a higher fracture risk, but there were fewer hip fractures in this group. Small numbers, multifactorial nature of hip fractures and the inability to control for many of these variables in the real world make efficacy of hip protector pads difficult to confirm. Hip protector pads should be offered as part of the osteoporosis management of frail elderly, especially in those unable/unwilling to take pharmacotherapy.
PubMed ID
19240980 View in PubMed
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Decreasing incidence of hip fracture in the Funen County, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82648
Source
Acta Orthop. 2006 Feb;77(1):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Nymark Tine
Lauritsen Jens M
Ovesen Ole
Röck Niels D
Jeune Bernard
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. tine.nymark@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Acta Orthop. 2006 Feb;77(1):109-13
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hip fracture incidence rates are high, and increase with increasing age. Previous studies have predicted a continued increase in both crude and age-standardized rates. METHOD: We estimated incidence rates, based on a complete and validated register containing verified and individually sequenced hip fractures from 1996-2003, for a population of 500,000 people in Funen County, Denmark. RESULTS: The verified number of the first hip fractures was 6,676, with 520 subsequent fractures. Between 1996 and 2003, the incidence rate of first hip fracture fell by 2.4% per year for males (p = 0.02) and by 1.8% per year for females (p = 0.004). The highest decrease of 3.4% per year (p = 0.02) was seen in 80-84-year-old women. INTERPRETATION: The incidence rate of the first hip fracture has fallen in both sexes. In most age groups, the actual number of fractures has also decreased. The findings emphasize the need for valid projection studies which should include both demographic projections and modeling of the effects of different levels of prevention.
PubMed ID
16534709 View in PubMed
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Do hip pads help prevent hip fractures?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194394
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 May;47:965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
C. Rivet
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Centre, Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 May;47:965-6
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Protective Devices
Notes
Cites: Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):225-916296684
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Nov 23;343(21):1506-1311087879
PubMed ID
11398729 View in PubMed
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Effect of exercise on extraskeletal risk factors for hip fractures in elderly women with low BMD: a population-based randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82077
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2006 May;21(5):772-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Korpelainen Raija
Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi Sirkka
Heikkinen Jorma
Väänänen Kalervo
Korpelainen Juha
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Deaconess Institute of Oulu, Finland. raija.korpelainen@oulu.fi
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2006 May;21(5):772-9
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density
Cohort Studies
Densitometry, X-Ray
Exercise
Female
Gait
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Risk factors
Abstract
We conducted a 30-month population-based, randomized, controlled trial in 160 elderly women at risk for fractures on the basis of a low baseline BMD. Mainly home-based weight-bearing exercise was effective in improving strength, balance, and gait. INTRODUCTION: Evidence on the effect of exercise on extraskeletal risk factors for hip fractures comes mainly from studies in voluntary low-risk women, and no population-based, long-term interventions have been performed in elderly women with low bone mass. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of long-term weight-bearing exercise on balance, muscle strength, and gait in elderly women at risk for fractures on the basis of a low baseline BMD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A birth cohort of 1690 women 70-73 years of age were invited to the radius and hip BMD measurements; 96 women were excluded because of medical reasons; 160 women with radius and hip BMD values of >2 SD below the reference value were included in the trial. The participants were randomly assigned to 30 months of impact, balancing, and strengthening exercises or to no intervention. Main outcome measures were body sway length and leg strength at month 30. Secondary endpoints included gait speed, endurance, and grip strength. Outcomes were assessed at 0, 12, 24, and 30 months using blinded operators. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to determine statistical significance. The analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. RESULTS: Body sway increased more in the control group than in the exercise group over time (time-group interaction, p
PubMed ID
16734393 View in PubMed
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Effect of external hip protectors on hip fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221886
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):11-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2-1993
Author
J B Lauritzen
M M Petersen
B. Lund
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery U 2161, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):11-3
Date
Jan-2-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clothing
Denmark - epidemiology
Equipment Design
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Orthotic Devices
Random Allocation
Abstract
Most hip fractures seem to be related to trauma near the hip, so a controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effect of external hip protectors on the prevention of such fractures in residents of a nursing home. 10 of the 28 wards in the nursing home were randomised to receive external hip protectors; thus 167 women and 80 men were given protectors and 277 and 141 men no protectors. A fall register was set up for 2 treatment wards (45 residents) and 2 control wards (76 residents). There were 8 hip and 15 non-hip fractures in the hip-protector group and 31 hip and 27 non-hip fractures in the control group. The relative risk of hip fractures among women and men in the intervention group was 0.44 (95% CI 0.21-0.94). None of the 8 residents in the intervention group who had a hip fracture was wearing the device at the time of the fracture. 154 falls were registered and 20% of these falls produced a direct impact to the hip. In 25 falls direct impact to the hip was sustained at a time when hip protectors were not being worn, and 6 fractures were produced. The study indicates that external hip protectors can prevent hip fractures in nursing-home residents.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1997 Aug 23;350(9077):563-49284784
PubMed ID
8093267 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the FRAX model for hip fracture predictions in the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259902
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2014 Jul;95(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Reijo Sund
Risto Honkanen
Helena Johansson
Anders Odén
Eugene McCloskey
John Kanis
Heikki Kröger
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2014 Jul;95(1):39-45
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - complications
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Probability
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
Calibration of the Finnish FRAX model was evaluated using a locally derived population-based cohort of postmenopausal women (n = 13,917). Hip fractures were observed from national register-based data and verified from radiological records. For a subpopulation of 11,182 women, there were enough data to calculate the fracture probabilities using the Finnish FRAX tool (without bone mineral density). A 10-year period prevalence of hip fractures to this subpopulation was 0.66 %. The expected numbers of hip fractures were significantly higher than the self reported ones (O/E ratio 0.46; 95 % CI 0.33-0.63), had a tendency to be greater than the observed ones (O/E ratio 0.83; 95 % CI 0.65-1.04), and calibration in terms of goodness-of-fit of absolute probabilities was questionable (P = 0.015). Strikingly, the 10-year period prevalence of hip fractures to the whole cohort was higher (0.84 %) than for the women with FRAX measurements (0.66 %). This was mainly the result of difference between people who had and who had not responded to postal enquiries (0.71 vs. 1.77 %, P
PubMed ID
24792689 View in PubMed
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External hip protectors in home-dwelling older persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180207
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2004 Feb;16(1):41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Rauno Heikinheimo
Anja Jalonen-Männikkö
Hellä Asumaniemi
Erkki Lehtomäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Tampere Health Center, Tampere, Finland. rauno.heikinheimo@raunomo.fi
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2004 Feb;16(1):41-3
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Frail Elderly
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Homebound Persons
Humans
Patient compliance
Protective Devices - economics - utilization
Abstract
External hip protectors have been shown to have a good preventive effect against hip fractures in many studies. However, these studies were carried out either entirely or mostly among older persons living in institutions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health nurses can, after brief training, choose the right persons to use external hip protectors, so that, with a fairly small number of protectors, the number of hip fractures in home-dwelling older persons in a given area could be significantly reduced.
One hundred and fifty pairs of external hip protectors were given to the health nurses of the Central district of Tampere Health Center, to give to those older persons aged more than 75 years who, in their opinion, most needed preventive measures against hip fractures. Older persons living in other districts served as controls. The number of hip fractures in each district for each 6-month period was obtained from the Data Center of Pirkanmaa Health District.
Whereas in control districts the number of hip fractures increased by 14 from 1.1.-30.6.1998 to 1.1.-30.6.2000 (49-63), their number diminished by 4 (43-39) in the Central district, where the protectors were used. The total cost of the external hip protectors was less than that required to treat one hip fracture in the first year.
External hip protectors are most probably effective and economical in preventing hip fractures also among home-dwelling older persons, as has previously been shown among nursing home patients.
PubMed ID
15132290 View in PubMed
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Factors related to occurrence of hip fracture during a fall on the hip.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7302
Source
Public Health. 2003 Jan;117(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
R. Willig
H. Luukinen
P. Jalovaara
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Central Hospital of Länsi-Pohja, Kemi, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Public Health. 2003 Jan;117(1):25-30
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services Research
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Prospective Studies
Protective Devices
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Recently, it has been shown that hip fractures can be effectively prevented by use of hip protectors. To determine who would gain most benefit from use of hip protectors, we conducted a study with the aim to clarify factors that contribute to the occurrence of fracture in individuals who fall on their hip. Hip fracture patients were compared with individuals who had fallen on their hip without sustaining a fracture. The study group consisted of 123 consecutive hip fracture patients aged 70 years or over (mean age 82 years, female 82 years and male 80 years). The control group comprised 132 individuals (mean age 81 years, female 81 years and male 80 years) obtained from a prospective study on falls, who had experienced a fall that caused a visible soft tissue injury (bruise or wound) at the hip or gluteal region without sustaining a fracture. Patients were questioned about associated diseases, medications, place of residence, walking ability, need for locomotor aids and some activities in daily living (ADL). Patients who sustained a hip fracture were more likely to be women, living in long-term institutional care, using neuroleptics, dependent in ADL and had more history of previous stroke with hemiparesis, more Parkinsonism and lower body mass indexes (BMI) than those who did not sustain a fracture on fall on the hip. According to a logistical regression model, institutional residence, low BMI and history of stroke with hemiplegic status differed between fracture cases and controls. Institutional residence, low BMI and history of hemiplegic stroke discriminate hip fracture patients from fallers who sustain a soft tissue injury on the hip region. In clinical practice, patients who have these characteristics would be potential candidates to use hip protectors and other preventive measures.
PubMed ID
12802901 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.