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Abdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43,000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261630
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Mar;277(3):306-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
A J Søgaard
K. Holvik
T K Omsland
G S Tell
C. Dahl
B. Schei
J A Falch
J A Eisman
H E Meyer
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Mar;277(3):306-17
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The question as to whether abdominal obesity has an adverse effect on hip fracture remains unanswered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index with incident hip fracture.
The data in this prospective study is based on Cohort of Norway, a population-based cohort established during 1994-2003. Altogether 19,918 women and 23,061 men aged 60-79 years were followed for a median of 8.1 years. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured at baseline using standard procedures. Information on covariates was collected by questionnaires. Hip fractures (n = 1,498 in women, n = 889 in men) were identified from electronic discharge registers from all general hospitals in Norway between 1994 and 2008.
The risk of hip fracture decreased with increasing body mass index, plateauing in obese men. However, higher waist circumference and higher waist-hip ratio were associated with an increased risk of hip fracture after adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders. Women in the highest tertile of waist circumference had an 86% (95% CI: 51-129%) higher risk of hip fracture compared to the lowest, with a corresponding increased risk in men of 100% (95% CI 53-161%). Lower body mass index combined with abdominal obesity increased the risk of hip fracture considerably, particularly in men.
Abdominal obesity was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture when body mass index was taken into account. In view of the increasing prevalence of obesity and the number of older people suffering osteoporotic fractures in Western societies, our findings have important clinical and public health implications.
PubMed ID
24597977 View in PubMed
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Acute alcohol use among patients with acute hip fractures: a descriptive incidence study in southeastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170436
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2006 May-Jun;41(3):345-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
J-P Kaukonen
I. Nurmi-Lüthje
P. Lüthje
H. Naboulsi
S. Tanninen
M. Kataja
M-L Kallio
M. Leppilampi
Author Affiliation
Päijät-Häme Central Hospital, Lahti, Finland. juha-pekka.kaukonen@phks.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2006 May-Jun;41(3):345-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Central Nervous System Depressants - blood
Data Collection
Ethanol - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
To assess the very recent use of alcohol among patients admitted to two Finnish hospitals due to an acute hip fracture.
Very recent use of alcohol was recorded according to the patient's or the relatives' report. Ethanol was measured in blood samples taken at admission. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, and vitamin D concentration were measured. Reported use of medication, vitamin D, and/or calcium supplementation was recorded.
Complete data were obtained on 222 of 375 eligible patients; 71% of those enrolled were women. The mean age of women was 80.5 years (SD 10) and of men 73 years (SD 12) (P 1.0 mg/l. Recent alcohol use was more common among patients in the age group of 65-74 years than among older patients (P
PubMed ID
16510531 View in PubMed
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Acute and long-term increase in fracture risk after hospitalization for stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195446
Source
Stroke. 2001 Mar;32(3):702-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
J. Kanis
A. Oden
O. Johnell
Author Affiliation
Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases (World Health Organization Collaborating Center), University of Sheffield Medical School (UK). w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk
Source
Stroke. 2001 Mar;32(3):702-6
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Abstract
The aims of this study were to determine the magnitude of the increase in fracture risk after hospitalization for stroke, and in particular to determine the time course of this risk.
The records of the Swedish register of patients admitted during 1987-1996 were examined to identify all patients who were admitted to the hospital for stroke. Patients were followed for subsequent hospitalizations for hip and all fractures combined. We analyzed 16.3 million hospitalizations, from which 273 288 individuals with stroke were identified. A Poisson model was used to determine the absolute risk of subsequent fractures and the risk compared with that of the general population.
After hospitalization for stroke, there was a >7-fold increase in fracture risk, including that for hip fracture within the first year after hospitalization for stroke. Thereafter, fracture risk declined toward, but did not attain, the baseline risk except in men and women aged >/=80 years.
The high incidence of new fractures within the first year of hospitalization for stroke suggests that such patients should be preferentially targeted for treatment. It is possible that short courses of treatment at the time of stroke would provide important therapeutic dividends.
PubMed ID
11239190 View in PubMed
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Acute and long-term increase in fracture risk after hospitalization for vertebral fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194968
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(3):207-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
O. Johnell
A. Oden
F. Caulin
J A Kanis
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö General Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(3):207-14
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications
Poisson Distribution
Risk factors
Spinal Fractures - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aims of this study were to determine the magnitude of the increase in risk of further fracture following hospitalization for vertebral fracture, and in particular to determine the time course of this risk. The records of the Swedish Patient Register were examined from 1987 to 1994 to identify all patients who were admitted to hospital for thoracic or lumbar vertebral fractures. Vertebral fractures were characterized as due to high- or low-energy trauma. Patients were followed for subsequent hospitalizations for hip fracture, and for all fractures combined. A Poisson model was used to determine the absolute risk of subsequent nonvertebral fracture and compared with that of the general population. We analyzed 13.4 million hospital admissions from which 28,869 individuals with vertebral fracture were identified, of which 60% were associated with low-energy trauma. There was a marked increase in subsequent incidence of hip and all fractures within the first year following hospitalization for vertebral fracture in both men and women. Thereafter, fracture incidence declined toward, but did not attain, baseline risk. Increased risks were particularly marked in the young. The increase in fracture risk was more marked following low-energy vertebral fracture than in the case of high-energy trauma. We conclude that the high incidence of new fractures within a year of hospitalization for vertebral fractures, irrespective of the degree of trauma involved, indicates that such patients should be preferentially targeted for treatment. It is speculated that short courses of treatment at the time of first vertebral fracture could provide important therapeutic dividends.
PubMed ID
11315239 View in PubMed
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Age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214844
Source
Lancet. 1995 Jul 1;346(8966):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1995

Age and sex patterns of hip fracture--changes in 30 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240424
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1984 Jun;55(3):290-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
O. Johnell
B. Nilsson
K. Obrant
I. Sernbo
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1984 Jun;55(3):290-2
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The age- and sex-specific incidence of hip fractures was studied over a period of 30 years. There was a continuous increase in incidence over the years. The trend was most obvious in the oldest age groups and in men.
PubMed ID
6741476 View in PubMed
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Age- and sex-specific incidence of femoral neck and trochanteric fractures. An analysis based on 20,538 fractures in Stockholm County, Sweden, 1972-1981.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234783
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1987 Sep;(222):132-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
R. Hedlund
U. Lindgren
A. Ahlbom
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1987 Sep;(222):132-9
Date
Sep-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - pathology
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Abstract
The risk of fracturing the proximal femur is high for individuals with metabolic bone disease or with low bone mass associated with advanced age. Incidences of 20,538 trochanteric and femoral neck fractures in adult Swedish men and women, from a computerized medical information register for all hospitals in Stockholm County, were analyzed for age- and sex-dependence. The rate of increase in the occurrence of fracture was nearly constant for both sexes, exponentially increasing with age for men over 20 years old and for women over 30 years old. The incidence of trochanteric and femoral neck fracture for men doubled every 7.8 and 7.0 years, respectively. The doubling rate of fracture incidence for premenopausal women, aged 30 to 49 years, did not significantly differ from that for postmenopausal women, aged 50 to 69 years. These findings suggest that age-associated factors common to both sexes provide the main risk for fracturing the proximal femur. Menopause does not pose a major risk.
PubMed ID
3621713 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake, beverage preference, and risk of hip fracture in men and women. Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10664
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun 1;149(11):993-1001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
Author
S. Høidrup
M. Grønbaek
A. Gottschau
J B Lauritzen
M. Schroll
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun 1;149(11):993-1001
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Abstract
The authors prospectively studied the association between quantity and type of alcohol intake and risk of hip fracture among 17,868 men and 13,917 women. Analyses were based on pooled data from three population studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. During follow-up, 500 first hip fractures were identified in women and 307 in men. A low to moderate weekly alcohol intake (1-27 drinks for men and 1-13 drinks for women) was not associated with hip fracture. Among men, the relative risk of hip fracture gradually increased for those who drank 28 drinks or more per week (relative risk (RR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.89 for 28-41 drinks; RR = 5.28, 95% CI 2.60-10.70 for 70 or more drinks) as compared with abstainers. Women who drank 14-27 drinks per week had an age-adjusted relative risk of hip fracture of 1.44 (95% CI 1.03-2.03), but the association weakened after adjustment for confounders (RR = 1.32, 95% CI 0.92-1.87). The risk of hip fracture differed according to the type of alcohol preferred: preferrers of beer had a higher risk of hip fracture (RR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.11-1.91) than preferrers of other types of alcoholic beverages. The corresponding relative risks for preferrers of wine and spirits were 0.77 (95% CI 0.58-1.03) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.58-1.14), respectively. In conclusion, an alcohol intake within the current European drinking limits does not influence the risk of hip fracture, whereas an alcohol intake of more than 27 drinks per week is a major risk factor for men.
PubMed ID
10355374 View in PubMed
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An earlier fracture as a risk factor for new fracture and its association with smoking and menopausal age in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67663
Source
Maturitas. 1996 May;24(1-2):97-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
C. Johansson
D. Mellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Vasa Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Maturitas. 1996 May;24(1-2):97-106
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Contraceptives, Oral - therapeutic use
Estrogens - therapeutic use
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Genitalia, Female - surgery
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Medical History Taking
Menopause
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology
Postmenopause
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Urogenital Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a previous fracture is a risk factor for fracture later in life and its association with tobacco smoking, menopausal age and the use of oral contraceptives. This is an epidemiological population study based on a questionnaire. A sample of 10000 women from seven birth cohorts between 1900-1940 was obtained at random from the population register. The overall response rate was 74.6%. The responders (n = 7459) represented 53% of the total population. METHODS: The women from all these birth cohorts were questioned regarding a possible history of fractures and the year in which they were sustained. The questionnaire also included questions about menopausal age, use of oral contraceptives, previous gynaecological operations and possible oestrogen medication. The women from the 1900-1920 birth cohorts were questioned in detail about urogenital disorders, while tobacco smoking data were recorded only for the 1930 and 1940 birth cohorts. RESULTS: The relative risk of sustaining a further fracture was significantly related to fracture premenopausally before 40 years of age and later fracture postmenopausally after 60 years of age (1.29; 0.97-1.70) compared to controls (0.78; 0.59-1.03)(P = 0.03). Both an early menopause and tobacco smoking were associated significantly with repeated fractures, while use of oral contraceptives had a protective effect against repeated fractures in the 1940 birth cohort. Logistic multiple regression showed that a fracture was a significant independent risk factor for further fracture in both cohorts 1900-1920 (P
PubMed ID
8794440 View in PubMed
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An estimate of the worldwide prevalence and disability associated with osteoporotic fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80610
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2006 Dec;17(12):1726-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Johnell O.
Kanis J A
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2006 Dec;17(12):1726-33
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Americas - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Forearm Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Humeral Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Spinal Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantify the global burden of osteoporotic fracture worldwide. METHODS: The incidence of hip fractures was identified by systematic review and the incidence of osteoporotic fractures was imputed from the incidence of hip fractures in different regions of the world. Excess mortality and disability weights used age- and sex-specific data from Sweden to calculate the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) lost due to osteoporotic fracture. RESULTS: In the year 2000 there were an estimated 9.0 million osteoporotic fractures of which 1.6 million were at the hip, 1.7 million at the forearm and 1.4 million were clinical vertebral fractures. The greatest number of osteoporotic fractures occurred in Europe (34.8%). The total DALYs lost was 5.8 million of which 51% were accounted for by fractures that occurred in Europe and the Americas. World-wide, osteoporotic fractures accounted for 0.83% of the global burden of non-communicable disease and was 1.75% of the global burden in Europe. In Europe, osteoporotic fractures accounted for more DALYs lost than common cancers with the exception of lung cancer. For chronic musculo-skeletal disorders the DALYs lost in Europe due to osteoporosis (2.0 million) were less than for osteoarthrosis (3.1 million) but greater than for rheumatoid arthritis (1.0 million). CONCLUSION: We conclude that osteoporotic fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developed countries.
PubMed ID
16983459 View in PubMed
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364 records – page 1 of 37.