Skip header and navigation

Refine By

24 records – page 1 of 3.

The Better Management of Patients with Osteoarthritis Program: Outcomes after evidence-based education and exercise delivered nationwide in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308941
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(9):e0222657
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2019
Author
Thérése Jönsson
Frida Eek
Andrea Dell'Isola
Leif E Dahlberg
Eva Ekvall Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Ortopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(9):e0222657
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hip - physiopathology
Humans
Knee - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - physiopathology
Outcome Assessment, Health Care
Pain - physiopathology
Quality of Life
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated a structured education- and exercise-based self-management program for patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA), using a registry-based study of data from 44,634 patients taken from the Swedish "Better Management of Patients with Osteoarthritis" registry. Outcome measures included a numeric rating scale (NRS), EuroQol five dimension scale (EQ-5D), Arthritis self-efficacy scale (ASES-pain and ASES-other symptoms), pain frequency, any use of OA medication, desire for surgery, fear-avoidance behavior, physical activity, and sick leave were reported at baseline, 3 and 12 month. Changes in scale variables were analyzed using general linear models for repeated measures and changes in binary variables by McNamara's test. All analyses were stratified by joint. At the 3-month follow-up, patients with knee (n = 30686) and hip (n = 13948) OA reported significant improvements in the NRS-pain, the EQ-5D index, the ASES-other symptoms, and ASES-pain scores with standardized effect size (ES) ranges for patients with knee OA of 0.25-0.57 and hip OA of 0.15-0.39. Significantly fewer patients reported pain more than once weekly, took OA medication, desired surgery, showed fear-avoidance behavior, and were physically inactive. At the 12-month follow-up, patients with knee (n = 21647) and hip (n = 8898) OA reported significant improvements in NRS-pain, EQ-5D index, and a decrease in ASES-other symptoms and ASES-pain scores with an ES for patients with knee OA of -0.04 to 0.43 and hip OA of -0.18 to 0.22. Significantly fewer patients reported daily pain, desired surgery (for hip OA), reported fear-avoidance behavior, and reported sick leave. Following these interventions, patients with knee and hip OA experienced significant reductions in symptoms and decreased willingness to undergo surgery, while using less OA medication and taking less sick leave. The results indicate that offering this program as the first-line treatment for OA patients may reduce the burden of this disease.
PubMed ID
31536554 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical and radiological outcome after periacetabular osteotomy: a cross-sectional study of 127 hips operated on from 1999-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262798
Source
Hip Int. 2014 Jul-Aug;24(4):369-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
Line B Dahl
Kristine Dengsø
Karl Bang-Christiansen
Michael M Petersen
Jens Stürup
Source
Hip Int. 2014 Jul-Aug;24(4):369-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - radiography - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Dislocation, Congenital - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Osteotomy - methods
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Range of Motion, Articular
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Few papers have described results after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) and risk factors for conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of the present paper was to analyse clinical and radiographic outcome, survival of the hip joint and risk factors of early conversion to THA in patients with PAO.
In the period 1999-2008, 93 patients (127 hips, median patient age 31, range 13-49 years) were operated on with PAO. Median follow-up was 7 (SD 2.1) years. Analyses of clinical and radiographic examinations, including WOMAC, were performed. Osteoarthritis was measured using Tönnis grade. Survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method and predictors of conversion to THA were calculated using Cox regression analysis with THA as defined endpoint.
Centre-edge angle improved significantly with a mean of 8.7 (95% CI: 7.1; 10.3) preoperatively to a mean of 24.6 (95% CI: 22.6; 26.6) at follow-up. Likewise the acetabular roof obliquity angle improved significantly with a mean of 21.2 (95% CI: 19.7; 22.6) preoperatively to 8.7 (95% CI: 7.1; 10.4) at follow-up. Eleven out of 127 hips had conversion to THA. The 11.7 years cumulated hip joint survival rate was 85% (95% CI: 0.753; 0.945). Significant predictors of converting to THA were preoperative high grade of OA and postoperative high degree of acetabular roof obliquity angle. An improvement was found in Harris Hip Score pain score after receiving a PAO (p = 0.01).
Our results, with almost 12 years survival data, are comparable with the literature. PAO is considered as an effective treatment for young adults with painful hip dysplasia, especially when preoperative criteria for conversion to THA are highlighted.
PubMed ID
24817397 View in PubMed
Less detail

Discriminant validity of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index physical functioning subscale in community samples with hip osteoarthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148197
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Oct;90(10):1772-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Yong-Hao Pua
Sallie M Cowan
Tim V Wrigley
Kim L Bennell
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, School of Physiotherapy, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. puayonghao@gmail.com
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Oct;90(10):1772-7
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology
Pain - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Pua Y-H, Cowan SM, Wrigley TV, Bennell KL. Discriminant validity of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index Physical Functioning Subscale in community samples with hip osteoarthritis.
To evaluate, in a community hip osteoarthritis (OA) sample, the discriminant validity of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical functioning (PF) subscale to differentiate between self-report measures of pain and physical function.
Cross-sectional.
Human movement laboratory of a university.
Adults (N=100; 60 women, 40 men; age, 62.3+/-10.1y) with radiographically confirmed symptomatic hip OA.
Not applicable.
Six self-report measures of pain and physical function-WOMAC-PF and WOMAC-Pain subscales, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) bodily pain and PF subscales, and 4-item pain intensity measure-were obtained. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to a correlated 2-factor measurement model that assumed discriminant validity: self-report measures of pain were conceptualized to load uniquely on 1 factor; self-report measures of physical function were conceptualized to load uniquely on the other factor.
Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the initially proposed model did not achieve an acceptable fit to the data. Allowing a correlation between the error terms of the WOMAC-PF with those of the WOMAC-Pain and the SF-36 bodily pain subscales resulted in a viable model that provided adequate fit to the data (chi(2)=7.5, P=.28).
The findings suggest that the discriminant validity of the WOMAC-PF subscale from self-report pain measures cannot be confirmed in community-dwelling adults with hip OA.
PubMed ID
19801070 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of asymmetrical limited hip flexion on seating posture, scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293053
Source
Res Dev Disabil. 2017 Dec; 71:18-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Atli Ágústsson
Þórarinn Sveinsson
Elisabet Rodby-Bousquet
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, School of Health Sciences, Research Centre of Movement Science, Reykjavík, Iceland. Electronic address: atli@hi.is.
Source
Res Dev Disabil. 2017 Dec; 71:18-23
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cerebral Palsy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hip - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Posture - physiology
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Scoliosis - physiopathology
Sweden
Torso
Young Adult
Abstract
Postural asymmetries with seating problems are common in adults with cerebral palsy.
To analyse the prevalence of asymmetrical limited hip flexion (90°.
Asymmetrical limited hip flexion affects the seating posture and is associated with scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.
PubMed ID
28987968 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of prior Salter or Chiari osteotomy on THA with developmental hip dysplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143652
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Jan;469(1):237-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Kenji Tokunaga
Nadim Aslam
Rad Zdero
Emil H Schemitsch
James P Waddell
Author Affiliation
Martin Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Shuter Wing, Room 5-066, St Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, ON M5B-1W8, Canada.
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Jan;469(1):237-43
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - instrumentation
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hip Dislocation, Congenital - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Osteotomy - methods
Prosthesis Design
Recovery of Function
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Controversy exists regarding the outcome of THA after prior pelvic osteotomy.
We conducted a retrospective chart and radiographic review to obtain outcome measures for perioperative complications, acetabular and femoral component revisions, Harris hip score, and survivorship and compared these outcomes for patients presenting with developmental dysplasia of the hip treated surgically using THA with and without prior pelvic osteotomy.
We performed 103 primary THAs in 87 patients with osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip with a minimum 3-year followup. Previous pelvic osteotomy was performed in 52 hips (Salter, 40; Chiari, nine; Salter and Chiari, three), and 51 hips had no previous surgery (control group).
The pelvic osteotomy group did not have higher rates of femoral or acetabular intraoperative fracture or dislocation compared with the control group. The overall revision rate was 28.8% in the pelvic osteotomy group compared with 19.6% in the control group. The revision rate for aseptic loosening was 23.1% in the pelvic osteotomy group compared with 17.6% in the control group. Harris hip scores (range, 20-87) were not compromised, and overall survivorship rates 8 years postoperatively were not different at any time between the pelvic osteotomy (83.3%) and control (88.4%) groups.
Prior pelvic osteotomy did not lead to a higher perioperative complication rate, higher revision rate, compromised Harris hip score, or shortened survivorship in eventual THA in developmental dysplasia of the hip.
Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Notes
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2001 Mar;(384):189-9711249165
Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2008 Jan;128(1):103-917943297
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2002 Sep;17(6):731-912216027
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2004 Feb;86-A(2):312-914960676
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2004 Jun;(423):118-2215232436
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2004 Jul;86(5):648-5415274258
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1966 Oct;48(7):1413-395921797
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1969 Jun;51(4):737-555783851
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1974 Jan-Feb;(98):55-714817245
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1979 Jan;61(1):15-23365863
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1986 Oct;68(8):1241-83771605
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1988 Jul;(232):26-363383491
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1991 Jul;73(4):626-312071647
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1991 Aug;73(7):1074-801874771
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1991 Oct;73(9):1348-541918117
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 1993 Oct;8(5):459-698245991
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1991 May;73(3):430-31670444
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2001 Feb;16(2):188-9511222892
Cites: Instr Course Lect. 1996;45:209-268727740
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1997 Jan;79(1):83-69020451
Cites: Instr Course Lect. 1998;47:275-839571429
Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 1998;117(4-5):222-79581248
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1998 Jul;80(7):969-799698001
Cites: Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb. 1955;87(1):14-2613312490
Cites: J Orthop Sci. 2005 Nov;10(6):557-6316307180
Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2006 Aug;126(6):394-40016628429
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2002 Feb;84-A(2):178-8611861722
PubMed ID
20458643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health-related quality of life and mobility of patients awaiting elective total hip arthroplasty: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187806
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Nov 12;167(10):1115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2002
Author
Jeffrey L Mahon
Robert B Bourne
Cecil H Rorabeck
David H Feeny
Larry Stitt
Susan Webster-Bogaert
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON. Jl.Mahon@lhsc.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Nov 12;167(10):1115-21
Date
Nov-12-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - rehabilitation - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
London
Male
Ontario
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology - surgery
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Walking
Abstract
Waits for elective total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis are common in publicly funded health care systems, but they may lead to poorer postoperative outcomes and loss of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) through progressive pain and immobility during the wait. These issues have not been examined from the time of referral for surgery. Our primary objective was to test whether a longer wait was associated with poorer postoperative HRQOL.
Patients needing possible total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis were identified upon referral to a surgeon in London, Ont. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index and mobility in the 6-Minute Walk, were assessed at baseline and every 3-6 months thereafter until at least 3 months after the surgery.
Of 553 potentially eligible patients referred for surgical assessment, 123 were placed on a waiting list for total hip arthroplasty; 114 underwent the procedure, and 99 of them returned for postoperative assessment. No significant differences in HRQOL or mobility were seen postoperatively between patients with short waits and those with long waits (a priori definitions 6 months respectively). At referral, however, patients with short waits had poorer HRQOL and were less mobile than those with long waits (p = 0.002 for WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index total score, 0.001 for pain, 0.009 for stiffness and 0.008 for function; p = 0.006 for 6-Minute Walk results). Patients with short waits experienced larger gains in these measures from the time of referral until the postoperative assessment than did patients with long waits (p = 0.002 for WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index total score,
Notes
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1999 Dec;30(6):1349-5910583645
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1995 Feb;(311):136-417634568
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):265-7110951722
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2000 Oct;15(7):877-8311061448
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2001 Apr;16(3):351-911307134
Cites: Can J Surg. 2002 Aug;45(4):269-7612174981
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1969 Jun;51(4):737-555783851
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Apr 15;132(8):919-233978515
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1987 May;135(5):1069-743579005
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1988 Dec;15(12):1833-403068365
Cites: Health Serv Manage. 1989 Dec;85(6):270-210296782
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1991;241:42-32014742
Cites: Qual Life Res. 1996 Feb;5(1):56-648901367
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Jan 11;314(7074):131-49006477
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 30;117(3):366-89064859
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 1997 Feb;3(1):59-689238608
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1997 Nov;12(11):686-979383137
Cites: Med J Aust. 1998 Nov 2;169(9):464-89847897
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1999 May;80(5):572-910326924
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 1999 Feb;11(1):47-5710411289
Cites: Med J Aust. 1999 Sep 6;171(5):235-810495753
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Sep 3;309(6954):593-68086952
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 1994 Oct;9(5):481-77807104
Cites: Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1995 Jul 22;139(29):1489-937630455
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 May 2;162(9):1297-30010813011
PubMed ID
12427702 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health-related quality of life in patients waiting for major joint replacement. A comparison between patients and population controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171099
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006;4:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Johanna Hirvonen
Marja Blom
Ulla Tuominen
Seppo Seitsalo
Matti Lehto
Pekka Paavolainen
Kalevi Hietaniemi
Pekka Rissanen
Harri Sintonen
Author Affiliation
National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland. johanna.hirvonen@stakes.fi
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006;4:3
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology - psychology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - physiopathology - psychology
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Several quality-of-life studies in patients awaiting major joint replacement have focused on the outcomes of surgery. Interest in examining patients on the elective waiting list has increased since the beginning of 2000. We assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients waiting for total hip (THR) or knee (TKR) replacement in three Finnish hospitals, and compared patients' HRQoL with that of population controls.
A total of 133 patients awaiting major joint replacement due to osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee joint were prospectively followed from the time the patient was placed on the waiting list to hospital admission. A sample of controls matched by age, gender, housing and home municipality was drawn from the computerised population register. HRQoL was measured by the generic 15D instrument. Differences between patients and the population controls were tested by the independent samples t-test and between the measurement points by the paired samples t-test. A linear regression model was used to explain the variance in the 15D score at admission.
At baseline, 15D scores were significantly different between patients and the population controls. Compared with the population controls, patients were worse off on the dimensions of moving (P
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Nov 12;167(10):1115-2112427702
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2002 Dec;46(12):3331-912483740
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2004 Apr;19(3):302-915067641
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1982;10(3):95-97156919
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 1995 Apr;10(2):169-757798097
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 1995 Dec;10(6):742-78749755
Cites: Qual Life Res. 1996 Feb;5(1):56-648901367
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1997 Dec;(345):67-789418623
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 1999 Feb;11(1):47-5710411289
Cites: Qual Life Res. 1999;8(1-2):45-5410457737
Cites: Med J Aust. 1999 Sep 6;171(5):235-810495753
Cites: Duodecim. 2005;121(8):861-7115931833
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2001 Feb;9(2):137-4611330253
Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2001 Mar;83(2):128-3311320923
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2001 Apr;16(3):351-911307134
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Mar;82(3):360-611245759
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2000 Spring;22(2):127-3010962705
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2000 Jul;27(7):1745-5210914862
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2002 Nov;41(11):1261-712421998
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2002 Sep;41(9):1001-712209033
Cites: J Formos Med Assoc. 2001 Jul;100(7):461-511579611
Cites: Ann Med. 2001 Jul;33(5):358-7011491195
Cites: Ann Med. 2001 Jul;33(5):344-911491193
Cites: Ann Med. 2001 Jul;33(5):328-3611491191
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Oct 15;53(5):653-816208653
PubMed ID
16423293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries: the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280301
Source
Qual Life Res. 2016 06;25(6):1423-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
06-2016
Author
N M van Schoor
S. Zambon
M V Castell
C. Cooper
M. Denkinger
E M Dennison
M H Edwards
F. Herbolsheimer
S. Maggi
M. Sánchez-Martinez
N L Pedersen
R. Peter
L A Schaap
J J M Rijnhart
S. van der Pas
D J H Deeg
Source
Qual Life Res. 2016 06;25(6):1423-32
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Germany
Hand - physiopathology
Health status
Humans
Italy
Male
Netherlands
Osteoarthritis - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - physiopathology
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Self Report
Sickness Impact Profile
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person's self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of OA. The objectives are: (1) To examine the cross-sectional association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH in the general population; (2) To examine whether this association differs between countries; (3) To examine whether physical function is a mediator in the association between clinical OA and SRH.
Baseline data of the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used, which includes pre-harmonized data from six European cohort studies (n = 2709). Clinical OA was defined according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. SRH was assessed using one question: How is your health in general? Physical function was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index and Australian/Canadian OA Hand Index.
The prevalence of fair-to-poor SRH ranged from 19.8 % in the United Kingdom to 63.5 % in Italy. Although country differences in the strength of the associations were observed, clinical OA of the hip, knee and hand were significantly associated with fair-to-poor SRH in five out of six European countries. In most countries and at most sites, the association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH was partly or fully mediated by physical function.
Clinical OA at different sites was related to fair-to-poor SRH in the general population. Most associations were (partly) mediated by physical functioning, indicating that deteriorating physical function in patients with OA should be a point of attention in patient care.
PubMed ID
26547441 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.