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Bacterial community composition and diversity of five different permafrost-affected soils of Northeast Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257936
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):426-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Lars Ganzert
Felizitas Bajerski
Dirk Wagner
Author Affiliation
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):426-41
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acidobacteria - genetics - growth & development
Bacteroidetes - genetics - growth & development
Biodiversity
Carbon - chemistry
Greenland
Heterotrophic Processes
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Ice
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Typing
Nitrogen - chemistry
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Proteobacteria - genetics - growth & development
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Greenland is one of the regions of interest with respect to climate change and global warming in the Northern Hemisphere. Little is known about the structure and diversity of the terrestrial bacterial communities in ice-free areas in northern Greenland. These soils are generally poorly developed and usually carbon- and nitrogen-limited. Our goal was to provide the first insights into the soil bacterial communities from five different sites in Northeast Greenland using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The comparison of environmental and biological data showed that the soil bacterial communities are diverse and significantly pH-dependent. The most frequently detected OTUs belonged to the phyla Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-) Proteobacteria. Low pH together with higher nitrogen and carbon concentrations seemed to support the occurrence of (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-) Proteobacteria (at the expense of Acidobacteria), whereas Bacteroidetes were predominant at higher values of soil pH. Our study indicates that pH is the main factor for shaping bacterial community, but carbon and nitrogen concentrations as well may become important, especially for selecting oligotrophic microorganisms.
PubMed ID
24819653 View in PubMed
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Bacterioneuston in Lake Baikal: Abundance, Spatial and Temporal Distribution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298429
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 11 19; 15(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-19-2018
Author
Agnia D Galachyants
Irina V Tomberg
Elena V Sukhanova
Yulia R Shtykova
Maria Yu Suslova
Ekaterina A Zimens
Vadim V Blinov
Maria V Sakirko
Valentina M Domysheva
Olga I Belykh
Author Affiliation
Limnological Institute Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Ulan-Batorskaya, Irkutsk 664033, Russia. agniagal@lin.irk.ru.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 11 19; 15(11):
Date
11-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Carbon - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Heterotrophic Processes
Lakes - chemistry - microbiology
Particulate Matter - analysis
Russia
Seasons
Temperature
Water Microbiology
Abstract
An aquatic surface microlayer covers more than 70% of the world's surface. Our knowledge about the biology of the surface microlayer of Lake Baikal, the most ancient lake on Earth with a surface area of 31,500 km², is still scarce. The total bacterial abundance, the number of cultured heterotrophic temporal bacteria, and the spatial distribution of bacteria in the surface microlayer and underlying waters of Lake Baikal were studied. For the first time, the chemical composition of the surface microlayer of Lake Baikal was determined. There were significant differences and a direct relationship between the total bacterial abundance in the surface microlayer and underlying waters of Lake Baikal, as well as between the number of cultured heterotrophic bacteria in studied water layers in the period of summer stratification. In the surface microlayer, the share of cultured heterotrophic bacteria was higher than in the underlying waters. The surface microlayer was characterized by enrichment with PO43-, total organic carbon and suspended particulate matter compared to underlying waters. A direct relationship was found between the number of bacteria in the surface microlayer and environmental factors, including temperature, total organic carbon and suspended particulate matter concentration.
PubMed ID
30463268 View in PubMed
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Benefits of Water Safety Plans: microbiology, compliance, and public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123644
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jul 17;46(14):7782-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2012
Author
Maria J Gunnarsdottir
Sigurdur M Gardarsson
Mark Elliott
Gudrun Sigmundsdottir
Jamie Bartram
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Iceland, Hjardarhaga 2-6, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland. mariag@hi.is
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jul 17;46(14):7782-9
Date
Jul-17-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Drinking Water - microbiology - standards
Guideline Adherence - standards
Heterotrophic Processes
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Logistic Models
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Water Microbiology - standards
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Water Safety Plan (WSP) methodology, which aims to enhance safety of drinking water supplies, has been recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004. WSPs are now used worldwide and are legally required in several countries. However, there is limited systematic evidence available demonstrating the effectiveness of WSPs on water quality and health. Iceland was one of the first countries to legislate the use of WSPs, enabling the analysis of more than a decade of data on impact of WSP. The objective was to determine the impact of WSP implementation on regulatory compliance, microbiological water quality, and incidence of clinical cases of diarrhea. Surveillance data on water quality and diarrhea were collected and analyzed. The results show that HPC (heterotrophic plate counts), representing microbiological growth in the water supply system, decreased statistically significant with fewer incidents of HPC exceeding 10 cfu per mL in samples following WSP implementation and noncompliance was also significantly reduced (p
PubMed ID
22679926 View in PubMed
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[Diversity and Physiological and Biochemical Properties of Heterotrophic Bacteria. Isolated from Lake Baikal Neuston.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289531
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):568-579
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
A D Galach'yants
N L Bel'kova
E V Sukhanova
V A Romanovskaya
G V Gladka
E D Bedoshvili
V V Parfenova
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):568-579
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alphaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Amino Acids - metabolism
Bacteroidetes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Betaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Biodiversity
Deinococcus - classification - isolation & purification - metabolism - radiation effects
Deltaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Disaccharides - metabolism
Ecosystem
Firmicutes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Gammaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Heterotrophic Processes - physiology - radiation effects
Lakes - microbiology
Microbial Consortia - physiology - radiation effects
Monosaccharides - metabolism
Phylogeny
Proteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Siberia
Surface Properties
Ultraviolet Rays
Abstract
For heterotrophic microorganisms (44 strains) isolated-from the surface film of Lake Baikal, iden- tification was carried out and their. physiological and biochemical characteristics were determined. Com- pared to the water column, diversity of cultured heterotrophs was low, indicating formation of stable micro- bial communities at the air-water interphase interface. Heterotrophic bacteria isolated from the surface mi- crolayer exhibited the enzymatic activity comparable to that for strains form other biofilm associations. Deinococcusfi6us strain NA202 'vas the most active component of the community, capable of utilization of the broadest spectrum of mono- and disaccharides,'sugars, and amino acids. This strain possessed the highest diversity of extracellular enzymes and was the most resistant to UV radiation. The physiological and bio- chemical properties of this strain may-be responsible for its adaptation to survival in extreme conditions of the surface microlayer. Our results improve our understanding of occurrence of UV-resistant strains in freshwater ecosystems.
PubMed ID
29364604 View in PubMed
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[Diversity and Physiological and Biochemical Properties of Heterotrophic Bacteria. Isolated from Lake Baikal Neuston.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289689
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):568-579
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
A D Galach'yants
N L Bel'kova
E V Sukhanova
V A Romanovskaya
G V Gladka
E D Bedoshvili
V V Parfenova
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):568-579
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alphaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Amino Acids - metabolism
Bacteroidetes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Betaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Biodiversity
Deinococcus - classification - isolation & purification - metabolism - radiation effects
Deltaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Disaccharides - metabolism
Ecosystem
Firmicutes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Gammaproteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
Heterotrophic Processes - physiology - radiation effects
Lakes - microbiology
Microbial Consortia - physiology - radiation effects
Monosaccharides - metabolism
Phylogeny
Proteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - radiation effects
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Siberia
Surface Properties
Ultraviolet Rays
Abstract
For heterotrophic microorganisms (44 strains) isolated-from the surface film of Lake Baikal, iden- tification was carried out and their. physiological and biochemical characteristics were determined. Com- pared to the water column, diversity of cultured heterotrophs was low, indicating formation of stable micro- bial communities at the air-water interphase interface. Heterotrophic bacteria isolated from the surface mi- crolayer exhibited the enzymatic activity comparable to that for strains form other biofilm associations. Deinococcusfi6us strain NA202 'vas the most active component of the community, capable of utilization of the broadest spectrum of mono- and disaccharides,'sugars, and amino acids. This strain possessed the highest diversity of extracellular enzymes and was the most resistant to UV radiation. The physiological and bio- chemical properties of this strain may-be responsible for its adaptation to survival in extreme conditions of the surface microlayer. Our results improve our understanding of occurrence of UV-resistant strains in freshwater ecosystems.
PubMed ID
29364604 View in PubMed
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Diversity of retrievable heterotrophic bacteria in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279935
Source
Braz J Microbiol. 2017 Jan - Mar;48(1):51-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rupesh Kumar Sinha
Kottekkatu Padinchati Krishnan
Ammanamveetil Abdulla Mohamed Hatha
Mujeeb Rahiman
Divya David Thresyamma
Savita Kerkar
Source
Braz J Microbiol. 2017 Jan - Mar;48(1):51-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Bacterial Load
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Biodiversity
Heterotrophic Processes
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Abstract
The diversity and abundance of retrievable pelagic heterotrophic bacteria in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord, was studied during the summer of 2011 (June, August, and September). Retrievable bacterial load ranged from 10(3) to 10(7)CFUL(-1) in June, while it was 10(4)-10(6)CFUL(-1) in August and September. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, a higher number of phylotypes was observed during August (22 phylotypes) compared to that during June (6 phylotypes) and September (12 phylotypes). The groups were classified into four phyla: Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Bacteroidetes was represented only by a single member Leewenhoekiella aequorea during the three months and was dominant (40%) in June. However, this dominance changed in August to a well-known phytopathogenic species Rhodococcus fascians (32%), which could be a result of decrease in the phytoplankton biomass following the secondary bloom. It is the first report of Halomonas titanicae isolation from the Arctic waters. It showed an increase in its abundance with the intrusion of Atlantic water into Kongsfjorden. Increased abundance of Psychrobacter species in the late summer months coincided with the presence of cooler waters. Thus, the composition and function of heterotrophic bacterial community was fundamentally different in different months. This could be linked to the changes in the water masses and/or phytoplankton bloom dynamics occurring in Arctic summer.
PubMed ID
28029589 View in PubMed
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Fractional contributions by autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration to soil-surface CO2 efflux in Boreal forests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95618
Source
SEB Exp Biol Ser. 2005;:251-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Högberg Peter
Nordgren Anders
Högberg Mona N
Ottosson-Löfvenius Mikaell
Bhupinderpal-Singh
Olsson Per
Linder Sune
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Ecology, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
SEB Exp Biol Ser. 2005;:251-67
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autotrophic Processes - physiology
Carbon Dioxide
Climate
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Greenhouse Effect
Heterotrophic Processes - physiology
Photosynthesis
Plant Roots - metabolism
Respiration
Soil Microbiology
Soil Pollutants
Trees - metabolism
Abstract
Soil-surface CO2 efflux ('soil respiration') accounts for roughly two-thirds of forest ecosystem respiration, and can be divided into heterotrophic and autotrophic components. Conventionally, the latter is defined as respiration by plant roots. In Boreal forests, however, fine roots of trees are invariably covered by ectomycorrhizal fungi, which by definition are heterotrophs, but like the roots, receive sugars derived from photosynthesis. There is also a significant leaching of labile carbon compounds from the ectomycorrhizal roots. It is, therefore, more meaningful in the context of carbon balance studies to include mycorrhizal fungi and other mycorrhizosphere organisms, dependent on the direct flux of labile carbon from photosynthesis, in the autotrophic component. Hence, heterotrophic activity becomes reserved for the decomposition of more complex organic molecules in litter and other forms of soil organic matter. In reality, the complex situation is perhaps best described as a continuum from strict autotrophy to strict heterotrophy. As a result of this, and associated methodological problems, estimates of the contribution of autotrophic respiration to total soil respiration have been highly variable. Based on recent stand-scale tree girdling experiments we have estimated that autotrophic respiration in boreal forest accounts for up to 50-65% of soil respiration during the snow-free part of the year. Girdling experiments and studies of the delta(13)C of the soil CO2 efflux show that there is a lag of a few days between the carbon uptake by photosynthesis and the release by autotrophic soil respiration of the assimilated carbon. In contrast, estimates of 'bomb 14C' and other approaches have suggested that it takes years to decades between carbon uptake via photosynthesis and the bulk of soil heterotrophic activity. Temperature is normally used as a driver in models of soil processes and it is often assumed that autotrophic soil activity is more sensitive to temperature than is heterotrophic activity, but this is questionable. It is inherently difficult to make a precise separation of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration from soils. The partitioning between these two components is highly variable in space and time, and taxonomic autotrophs and heterotrophs may perform the function of the other group to some degree. Care should be taken to disturb as little as possible the delicate plant-microbe-soil system, and this speaks for non-intrusive isotopic methods. There are, however, problems in modelling the flux of isotopes through this complex system. Girdling of tree stands is a very robust alternative approach to make the distinction between autotrophic and heterotrophic activities, but ultimately kills the trees and cannot, therefore, always be used. A further development would be to block the phloem sugar transport reversibly. We propose that thus assumption needs further critical testing.
PubMed ID
17633039 View in PubMed
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Future climate scenarios for a coastal productive planktonic food web resulting in microplankton phenology changes and decreased trophic transfer efficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259367
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94388
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Albert Calbet
Andrey F Sazhin
Jens C Nejstgaard
Stella A Berger
Zachary S Tait
Lorena Olmos
Despoina Sousoni
Stamatina Isari
Rodrigo A Martínez
Jean-Marie Bouquet
Eric M Thompson
Ulf Båmstedt
Hans H Jakobsen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94388
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomass
Chlorophyll - biosynthesis
Ciliophora - physiology
Climate
Climate change
Diatoms - physiology
Dinoflagellida - physiology
Eutrophication
Food chain
Forecasting
Heterotrophic Processes
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Models, Statistical
Norway
Phytoplankton - physiology
Temperature
Abstract
We studied the effects of future climate change scenarios on plankton communities of a Norwegian fjord using a mesocosm approach. After the spring bloom, natural plankton were enclosed and treated in duplicates with inorganic nutrients elevated to pre-bloom conditions (N, P, Si; eutrophication), lowering of 0.4 pH units (acidification), and rising 3°C temperature (warming). All nutrient-amended treatments resulted in phytoplankton blooms dominated by chain-forming diatoms, and reached 13-16 µg chlorophyll (chl) a l-1. In the control mesocosms, chl a remained below 1 µg l-1. Acidification and warming had contrasting effects on the phenology and bloom-dynamics of autotrophic and heterotrophic microplankton. Bacillariophyceae, prymnesiophyceae, cryptophyta, and Protoperidinium spp. peaked earlier at higher temperature and lower pH. Chlorophyta showed lower peak abundances with acidification, but higher peak abundances with increased temperature. The peak magnitude of autotrophic dinophyceae and ciliates was, on the other hand, lowered with combined warming and acidification. Over time, the plankton communities shifted from autotrophic phytoplankton blooms to a more heterotrophic system in all mesocosms, especially in the control unaltered mesocosms. The development of mass balance and proportion of heterotrophic/autotrophic biomass predict a shift towards a more autotrophic community and less-efficient food web transfer when temperature, nutrients and acidification are combined in a future climate-change scenario. We suggest that this result may be related to a lower food quality for microzooplankton under acidification and warming scenarios and to an increase of catabolic processes compared to anabolic ones at higher temperatures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24721992 View in PubMed
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Heterotrophic communities supplied by ancient organic carbon predominate in deep fennoscandian bedrock fluids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267072
Source
Microb Ecol. 2015 Feb;69(2):319-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Lotta Purkamo
Malin Bomberg
Mari Nyyssönen
Ilmo Kukkonen
Lasse Ahonen
Merja Itävaara
Source
Microb Ecol. 2015 Feb;69(2):319-32
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Cloning, Molecular
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Finland
Gene Library
Genes, Bacterial
Genetic markers
Heterotrophic Processes
Methane - metabolism
Nitrogen Cycle
Phylogeny
Phylogeography
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
The deep subsurface hosts diverse life, but the mechanisms that sustain this diversity remain elusive. Here, we studied microbial communities involved in carbon cycling in deep, dark biosphere and identified anaerobic microbial energy production mechanisms from groundwater of Fennoscandian crystalline bedrock sampled from a deep drill hole in Outokumpu, Finland, by using molecular biological analyses. Carbon cycling pathways, such as carbon assimilation, methane production and methane consumption, were studied with cbbM, rbcL, acsB, accC, mcrA and pmoA marker genes, respectively. Energy sources, i.e. the terminal electron accepting processes of sulphate-reducing and nitrate-reducing communities, were assessed with detection of marker genes dsrB and narG, respectively. While organic carbon is scarce in deep subsurface, the main carbon source for microbes has been hypothesized to be inorganic carbon dioxide. However, our results demonstrate that carbon assimilation is performed throughout the Outokumpu deep scientific drill hole water column by mainly heterotrophic microorganisms such as Clostridia. The source of carbon for the heterotrophic microbial metabolism is likely the Outokumpu bedrock, mainly composed of serpentinites and metasediments with black schist interlayers. In addition to organotrophic metabolism, nitrate and sulphate are other possible energy sources. Methanogenic and methanotrophic microorganisms are scarce, but our analyses suggest that the Outokumpu deep biosphere provides niches for these organisms; however, they are not very abundant.
PubMed ID
25260922 View in PubMed
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Inactivation of marine heterotrophic bacteria in ballast water by an Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295383
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 01; 140:377-386
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Javier Moreno-Andrés
Noëmi Ambauen
Olav Vadstein
Cynthia Hallé
Asunción Acevedo-Merino
Enrique Nebot
Thomas Meyn
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Technologies, INMAR-Marine Research Institute, University of Cádiz, Campus Universitario Puerto Real, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain. Electronic address: javier.moreno@uca.es.
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 01; 140:377-386
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bacteria
Boron
Chlorine - pharmacology
Diamond
Disinfection - instrumentation - methods
Electrochemical Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrodes
Heterotrophic Processes
Kinetics
Norway
Oxidants - chemistry
Oxidation-Reduction
Seawater - microbiology
Ships
Water Microbiology
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Seawater treatment is increasingly required due to industrial activities that use substantial volumes of seawater in their processes. The shipping industry and the associated management of a ship's ballast water are currently considered a global challenge for the seas. Related to that, the suitability of an Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Process (EAOP) with Boron Doped Diamond (BDD) electrodes has been assessed on a laboratory scale for the disinfection of seawater. This technology can produce both reactive oxygen species and chlorine species (especially in seawater) that are responsible for inactivation. The EAOP was applied in a continuous-flow regime with real seawater. Natural marine heterotrophic bacteria (MHB) were used as an indicator of disinfection efficiency. A biphasic inactivation kinetic model was fitted on experimental points, achieving 4-Log reductions at 0.019?Ah?L-1. By assessing regrowth after treatment, results suggest that higher bacterial damages result from the EAOP when it is compared to chlorination. Furthermore, several issues lacking fundamental understanding were investigated such as recolonization capacity or bacterial community dynamics. It was concluded that, despite disinfection processes being effective, there is not only a possibility for regrowth after treatment but also a change on bacterial population diversity produced by the treatment. Finally, energy consumption was estimated and indicated that 0.264?kWh·m-3 are needed for 4.8-Log reductions of MHB; otherwise, with 0.035?kWh·m-3, less disinfection efficiency can be obtained (2.2-Log red). However, with a residual oxidant in the solution, total inactivation can be achieved in three days.
PubMed ID
29753242 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.