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An epidemiologic study of congenital malformations of the anterior abdominal wall in more than half a million consecutive live births.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244560
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1981 May;33(3):470-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
P A Baird
E C MacDonald
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1981 May;33(3):470-8
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
British Columbia
Female
Hernia, Umbilical - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Registries
Syndrome
Urogenital Abnormalities
Abstract
The records of an ongoing health surveillance registry that utilizes multiple sources of ascertainment were used to study the incidence rate of congenital malformations of the anterior abdominal wall in live-born children in British Columbia during the period 1964--1978 inclusive. No overall increase in incidence rate of these anomalies was detected during the study period. The estimated live-born incidence rates were: one in 4,175 live births for omphalocoele, one in 12,328 live births for gastroschisis, and one in 29,231 live births for prune belly. The data were analyzed with regard to sex and associated anomalies. Some practical implications regarding assessment of these infants are discussed.
Notes
Cites: Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1967 Oct;125(4):837-504227443
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1975 Jul-Aug;66(4):322-6125623
Cites: Birth Defects Orig Artic Ser. 1974;10(4):127-354283493
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Aug 14;2(7981):345-660574
Cites: Surgery. 1977 Nov;82(5):561-8144328
Cites: Lancet. 1978 Mar 25;1(8065):66076191
Cites: Lancet. 1979 Sep 1;2(8140):47089528
Cites: Lancet. 1980 Feb 9;1(8163):3176153445
Cites: Surgery. 1953 Jan;33(1):112-2013015321
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1953 Jun;5(2):168-7513065264
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1963 May;10:75-913967064
Cites: Surgery. 1965 Feb;57:297-30114263805
PubMed ID
6454342 View in PubMed
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Gastrointestinal malformations in Funen county, Denmark--epidemiology, associated malformations, surgery and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58520
Source
Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2002 Apr;12(2):101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
E. Garne
L. Rasmussen
S. Husby
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology-IST, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. Egarne@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2002 Apr;12(2):101-6
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Anal Canal - abnormalities
Denmark - epidemiology
Digestive System Abnormalities
Duodenal Diseases - epidemiology
Esophageal Atresia - epidemiology
Gastroschisis - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Hernia, Diaphragmatic - epidemiology
Hernia, Umbilical - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intestinal Atresia - epidemiology
Morbidity
Prevalence
Prognosis
Abstract
AIM: To report the epidemiology, associated malformations, morbidity and mortality for the first 5 years of life for infants with gastrointestinal malformations (GIM). METHODS: Population-based study using data from a registry of congenital malformations (Eurocat) and follow-up data from hospital records. The study included livebirths, fetal deaths with a gestational age of 20 weeks and older and induced abortions after prenatal diagnosis of malformations born during the period 1980 - 1993. RESULTS: A total of 109 infants/fetuses with 118 GIM were included in the study giving a prevalence of 15.3 (12.6 - 18.5) cases per 10 000 births. Anal atresia was present in seven of the 9 cases with more than one GIM. There were 38 cases (35 %) with associated malformations and/or karyotype anomalies. Thirty-two of the 90 live-born infants died during the first 5 years of life with the majority of deaths during the first week of life. Mortality was significantly increased for infants with associated malformations or karyotype anomalies compared to infants with isolated GIM (p
PubMed ID
12015653 View in PubMed
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[Gastroschisis and omphalocele in Denmark. An epidemiological study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60400
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Apr 25;145(17):1323-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-25-1983

Gastroschisis and omphalocele in Finland in the 1970s: prevalence at birth and its correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242710
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1982 Dec;36(4):289-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1982
Author
K. Hemminki
I. Saloniemi
P. Kyyrönen
M. Kekomäki
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1982 Dec;36(4):289-93
Date
Dec-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities
Adult
Birth weight
Female
Finland
Hernia, Umbilical - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Occupations
Parity
Seasons
Sex Factors
Abstract
Information on liveborn and stillborn children with gastroschisis and omphalocele was collected from hospital and register sources in Finland from 1970 to 1979. The apparent prevalence of gastroschisis at birth increased from 0.77/10 000 births in 1970-4 to 1.42/10 000 in 1975-9. The prevalence of omphalocele (1.96/10 000) was unchanged during the decade. Even for gastroschisis the apparent increase in prevalence was noted for northern Finland only, while for southern Finland the prevalence has been stable during the 1970s, possibly suggesting diagnostic or reporting differences between various parts of the country. Some correlates of increased risk of gastroschisis included: low birth weight, low maternal age, urban residence, and maternal employment in commercial and sales work.
Notes
Cites: Ann Surg. 1963 Aug;158:263-914047550
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1974 Oct;100(4):297-3064424457
Cites: Surgery. 1977 Nov;82(5):561-8144328
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1977 Dec;131(12):1386-8930890
Cites: Lancet. 1978 Feb 18;1(8060):38575417
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1978 Feb;13(1):47-9147327
Cites: Duodecim. 1979;95(2):73-80153833
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1979 May;133(5):514-7155396
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand. 1981 Jan;70(1):55-606452021
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1981 Mar;35(1):5-107264533
Cites: Surgery. 1953 Jan;33(1):112-2013015321
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1953 Jun;5(2):168-7513065264
PubMed ID
6220103 View in PubMed
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The incidence and maternal age distribution of abdominal wall defects in Norway and Arkhangelskaja Oblast in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89490
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Feb;68(1):75-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Petrova Jelena G
Vaktskjold Arild
Author Affiliation
PG. Vyzletsova, Clinical Children Hospital of Arkhangelskaja Oblast, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Feb;68(1):75-83
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Female
Gastroschisis - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Hernia, Umbilical - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Russia - epidemiology
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the foetal incidence of isolated anterior abdominal wall defects (gastroschisis and omphalocele) in the Arkhangelskaja Oblast (AO) in Russia and in Norway, as well as to study the maternal-age distribution of these defects. STUDY DESIGN: A register-based incidence study. METHODS: All registered foetuses and newborns with at least 12 weeks of gestation in the populations of AO (141,159) and Norway (293,708) were included. The data covered the period 1995-2004 in AO and 1999-2003 in Norway and were obtained from the malformation register in AO and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. RESULTS: The majority of the outcomes with a defect were liveborn in Norway (65%), while in AO the majority were spontaneously or medically aborted (59%). The incidence of anterior abdominal wall defects was 5.4/10,000 (95% confidence limits: +/- 1.7) in AO and 5.1/10,000 +/- 0.8) in Norway, and the ratio of omphalocele to gastroschisis was 1.2 in AO vs. 0.9 in Norway. Gastroschisis was inversely associated with maternal age in Norway. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a difference in maternal age distribution, there was no difference in the incidence of abdominal wall defects in AO and Norway. Gastroschisis was associated with young maternal age only in Norway, and the higher incidence in maternal age groups younger than 25 warrants further studies about aetiological factors associated with young maternal age.
PubMed ID
19331243 View in PubMed
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Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1982 Sep;34(5):827-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
R R Lebel
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1982 Sep;34(5):827-8
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Europe
Hernia, Umbilical - epidemiology
Humans
Notes
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1981 May;33(3):470-86454342
PubMed ID
7124738 View in PubMed
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Increasing risk of gastroschisis in Norway: an age-period-cohort analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30524
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb 15;159(4):358-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2004
Author
Method R Kazaura
Rolv T Lie
Lorentz M Irgens
Allan Didriksen
Mariann Kapstad
John Egenaes
Tor Bjerkedal
Author Affiliation
Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Kazaura.method@cih.uib.no
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb 15;159(4):358-63
Date
Feb-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Gastroschisis - epidemiology
Hernia, Umbilical - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Paternal Age
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Abstract
The prevalence of gastroschisis in Norway, as reported to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, increased regularly and sixfold from 0.5 to 2.9 per 10,000 births during 1967-1998. The prevalence was also consistently higher among children of younger mothers. The authors used age-period-cohort analysis to assess effects of both parents' age and year of birth (parental cohorts). Mother's and father's age were included in three different regression models. Apart from a significantly higher risk at a young maternal age, the authors also found higher risk at a young paternal age (1.6-fold per 10 years' reduction in father's age, 95% confidence interval: 1.0, 2.4). The time trend was highly significant regardless of whether it was ascribed to period, mother's year of birth, or father's year of birth. However, when father's year of birth was used to describe the time trend, no apparent additional effect of father's age was found, only for mother's age. The time trend is likely caused by environmental factors. Persistently increasing risks among children of young mothers may hypothetically be related to lifestyle factors. A contribution to risk also from fathers born in more recent years or from young fathers increases the likelihood that a factor related to modern lifestyles of young couples may be related to risk.
PubMed ID
14769639 View in PubMed
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Lower reoperation rate for recurrence after mesh versus sutured elective repair in small umbilical and epigastric hernias. A nationwide register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108437
Source
World J Surg. 2013 Nov;37(11):2548-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
M W Christoffersen
F. Helgstrand
J. Rosenberg
H. Kehlet
T. Bisgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Hvidovre Hospital, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Kettegård Alle 30, 2650, Hvidovre, Denmark, mette.willaume@gmail.com.
Source
World J Surg. 2013 Nov;37(11):2548-52
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hernia, Umbilical - epidemiology - surgery
Herniorrhaphy - methods
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Registries
Reoperation
Surgical Mesh
Suture Techniques
Abstract
Repair for a small (= 2 cm) umbilical and epigastric hernia is a minor surgical procedure. The most common surgical repair techniques are a sutured repair or a repair with mesh reinforcement. However, the optimal repair technique with regard to risk of reoperation for recurrence is not well documented. The aim of the present study was in a nationwide setup to investigate the reoperation rate for recurrence after small open umbilical and epigastric hernia repairs using either sutured or mesh repair.
This was a prospective cohort study based on intraoperative registrations from the Danish Ventral Hernia Database (DVHD) of patients undergoing elective open mesh and sutured repair for small (= 2 cm) umbilical and epigastric hernias. Patients were included during a 4-year study period. A complete follow-up was obtained by combining intraoperative data from the DVHD with data from the Danish National Patient Register. The cumulative reoperation rates were obtained using cumulative incidence plot and compared with the log rank test.
In total, 4,786 small (= 2 cm) elective open umbilical and epigastric hernia repairs were included. Age was median 48 years (range 18-95 years). Follow-up was 21 months (range 0-47 months). The cumulated reoperation rates for recurrence were 2.2 % for mesh reinforcement and 5.6 % for sutured repair (P = 0.001). The overall cumulated reoperation rate for sutured and mesh repairs was 4.8 %. In conclusion, reoperation rate for recurrence for small umbilical and epigastric hernias was significantly lower after mesh repair compared with sutured repair. Mesh reinforcement should be routine in even small umbilical or epigastric hernias to lower the risk of reoperation for recurrence avoid recurrence.
Notes
Comment In: World J Surg. 2013 Nov;37(11):2553-423942536
PubMed ID
23887595 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.