Skip header and navigation

Refine By

89 records – page 1 of 9.

Academic performance in adolescence after inguinal hernia repair in infancy: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136563
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tom G Hansen
Jacob K Pedersen
Steen W Henneberg
Dorthe A Pedersen
Jeffrey C Murray
Neil S Morton
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. tomghansen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Anesthesia - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Causality
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Odds Ratio
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although animal studies have indicated that general anesthetics may result in widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurocognitive impairment in the developing brain, results from human studies are scarce. We investigated the association between exposure to surgery and anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair in infancy and subsequent academic performance.
Using Danish birth cohorts from 1986-1990, we compared the academic performance of all children who had undergone inguinal hernia repair in infancy to a randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample. Primary analysis compared average test scores at ninth grade adjusting for sex, birth weight, and paternal and maternal age and education. Secondary analysis compared the proportions of children not attaining test scores between the two groups.
From 1986-1990 in Denmark, 2,689 children underwent inguinal hernia repair in infancy. A randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample consists of 14,575 individuals. Although the exposure group performed worse than the control group (average score 0.26 lower; 95% CI, 0.21-0.31), after adjusting for known confounders, no statistically significant difference (-0.04; 95% CI, -0.09 to 0.01) between the exposure and control groups could be demonstrated. However, the odds ratio for test score nonattainment associated with inguinal hernia repair was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04-1.35). Excluding from analyses children with other congenital malformations, the difference in mean test scores remained nearly unchanged (0.05; 95% CI, 0.00-0.11). In addition, the increased proportion of test score nonattainment within the exposure group was attenuated (odds ratio = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.31).
In the ethnically and socioeconomically homogeneous Danish population, we found no evidence that a single, relatively brief anesthetic exposure in connection with hernia repair in infancy reduced academic performance at age 15 or 16 yr after adjusting for known confounding factors. However, the higher test score nonattainment rate among the hernia group could suggest that a subgroup of these children are developmentally disadvantaged compared with the background population.
Notes
Comment In: Anesthesiology. 2011 Dec;115(6):1387; author reply 1387-822108309
PubMed ID
21368654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptable nationwide outcome after paediatric inguinal hernia repair.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259226
Source
Hernia. 2014 Jun;18(3):325-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
T. Bisgaard
H. Kehlet
J. Oehlenschlager
J. Rosenberg
Source
Hernia. 2014 Jun;18(3):325-31
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Herniorrhaphy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The primary objective was to describe 30-day outcomes after primary inguinal paediatric hernia repair.
Prospectively collected data from the National Patient Registry covering a 2-year study period 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2006 were collected. Unexpected outcomes were defined as either/or hospital stay for >1 day (i.e. 2 nights at hospital or more), readmission within 30 days, reoperations within 12 months after repair including repair for recurrence, and death within 30 days after repair.
The study cohort comprised 2,476 patients, and unexpected outcome was found in 267 patients/repairs (10.8 %). Prolonged hospital stay was by far the most prevalent indicator of unexpected outcome. Prolonged hospital stay was in 8.2 %, readmission in 2.1 %, reoperation in 0.7 %, and complications were observed in 1.1 %. One patient died within 30 days after repair, but death was not associated with the inguinal hernia repair. The usual technique was a simple sutured plasty (96.5 %). Emergency repair was performed in 54 patients (2.2 %) mainly in children between 0 and 2 years (79.6 %). During the 1 year follow-up, reoperation for recurrent inguinal hernia was performed in 8 children after elective repair (recurrence rate 0.3 %). Paediatric repairs were for most parts performed in surgical public hospitals, and most departments performed less than 10 inguinal hernia repairs within the 2 years study period.
These nationwide results are acceptable with low numbers of patients staying more than one night at hospital, low morbidity, and no procedure-related mortality.
PubMed ID
23508870 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambulatory inguinal hernia repair compared with short-stay surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250913
Source
Am J Surg. 1976 Jul;132(1):32-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1976
Author
S. Kornhall
A M Olsson
Source
Am J Surg. 1976 Jul;132(1):32-3
Date
Jul-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Postoperative Complications
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Two groups of patients operated on for inguinal hernia, one outpatient group and one inpatient group, are compared with respect to subjective distress and immediate postoperative complications. The groups were chosen at random and matched for sex and age. A large number of those who received treatment as outpatients suffered marked distress during the first postoperative days. Some form of intermediary or light nursing should be tried out for the outpatients so that if necessary they can stay the night after operation at the hospital. The number of postoperative complications was equal in the two groups. With suitable patient selection and with a small number of reserve places in a light-care ward, the majority of inguinal hernia operations can be performed on outpatients, resulting in a considerable economic saving and shorter waiting time.
PubMed ID
952335 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ambulatory surgery and patients' experiences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208704
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 10;117(9):1308-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1997
Author
B A Forsdahl
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen, Regionsykehuset i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 10;117(9):1308-10
Date
Apr-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - standards
Anesthesia, Spinal - adverse effects - standards
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis
Questionnaires
Sterilization, Tubal
Varicose Veins - surgery
Abstract
76 patients were interviewed by telephone 7-10 days after ambulant surgery for varicose veins, hernia inguinalis or sterilization (women). Of those who received spinal anaesthesia 24% developed headache and another 8% back-pain. Half of those who received general anaesthesia were too sleepy to recall the information they were given when they left the hospital. 22% of the patients reported that if they had to undergo the same operation again they would prefer to be admitted to hospital as inpatients. The interviews revealed many "minor" problems that could have been solved by a phone call on the first day after operation.
PubMed ID
9182362 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ambulatory surgery for inguinal hernia. Patients' experiences with simplified routines].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208729
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 2;94(14):1292-4, 1296
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-1997
Author
U. Gunnarsson
R. Heuman
V. Wendel-Hansen
Author Affiliation
kirurgiska kliniken, Mora lasarett.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 2;94(14):1292-4, 1296
Date
Apr-2-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - methods - standards
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Patient satisfaction
Sweden
PubMed ID
9162809 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaesthesia and post-operative morbidity after elective groin hernia repair: a nation-wide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93926
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2008 Feb;52(2):169-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Bay-Nielsen M.
Kehlet H.
Author Affiliation
The Danish Hernia Database, Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. morten.bay.Nielsen@hvh.regionh.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2008 Feb;52(2):169-74
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Anesthesia - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Anesthesia, Conduction - adverse effects - mortality
Anesthesia, General - adverse effects - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - chemically induced
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Surgical Procedures, Elective - methods
Urinary Retention - chemically induced
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Randomised studies suggest regional anaesthesia to have the highest morbidity and local infiltration anaesthesia to have the lowest morbidity after groin hernia repair. However, implications and results of this evidence for general practice are not known. METHODS: Prospective nation-wide data collection in a cohort of n=29,033 elective groin hernia repairs, registered in the Danish Hernia Database in three periods, namely July 1998-June 1999, July 2000-June 2001 and July 2002-June 2003. Retrospective analysis of complications in discharge abstracts, identified from re-admission within 30 days post-operatively, prolonged length of stay (>2 days post-operatively) or death. RESULTS: Complications after groin hernia repair were more frequent in patients 65+ years (4.5%), compared with younger patients (2.7%) (P
PubMed ID
17999709 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaesthetic practice for groin hernia repair--a nation-wide study in Denmark 1998-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176132
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Feb;49(2):143-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
H. Kehlet
M. Bay Nielsen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Hernia Database, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark. henrik.kehlet@rh.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Feb;49(2):143-6
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Conduction - utilization
Anesthesia, General - utilization
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Denmark
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Middle Aged
Pain - prevention & control
Abstract
Recent scientific data suggest that local infiltration anaesthesia for inguinal hernia surgery may be preferable compared to general anaesthesia and regional anaesthesia, since it is cheaper and with less urinary morbidity. Regional anaesthesia may have specific side-effects and is without documented advantages on morbidity in this small operation.
To describe the use of the three anaesthetic techniques for elective open groin hernia surgery in Denmark from January 1st 1998 to December 31st 2003, based on the Danish Hernia Database collaboration.
In a total of 57,505 elective open operations 63.6% were performed in general anaesthesia, 18.3% in regional anaesthesia and 18.1% in local anaesthesia. Regional anaesthesia was utilized with an increased rate in elderly and hospitalized patients. Outpatient surgery was most common with local infiltration anaesthesia.
Use/choice of anaesthesia for groin hernia repair is not in accordance with recent scientific data. Use of spinal anaesthesia should be reduced and increased use of local anaesthesia is recommended to enhance recovery and reduce costs.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Feb;49(2):131-215715610
PubMed ID
15715612 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Canadian repair: personal observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230176
Source
World J Surg. 1989 Sep-Oct;13(5):516-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
G E Wantz
Source
World J Surg. 1989 Sep-Oct;13(5):516-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hernia, Femoral - surgery
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Male
Methods
Recurrence
Abstract
The Canadian hernioplasty is the modern equivalent of the original Bassini operation. Most of the criticism of the repair is unjustified, even the fact that the repair does not address the femoral canal. The incidence of the femoral type of recurrence that typically occurs in the first year was only 0.14% among the 4,366 primary Canadian hernioplasties performed by one surgeon in the years 1970 to 1987. There were a total of 58 recurrences for a raw recurrence rate of 1.3%. About half of the recurrences were considered to be failures of the hernioplasty, and the remaining ones were attributable to continued deterioration of the patient's tissues. This huge experience of one surgeon demonstrates that recurrence rates, to a great extent, depend on the skills of the surgeon. Recurrence rates decrease as a surgeon's experience with the procedure increases. It also demonstrates the importance of technique and how a minor change in the method of beginning the continuous suture reduced suture tension and eliminated the well-known pubic tubercle type of recurrence seen after all hernioplasties. The recurrence rate for 639 recurrent and rerecurrent hernias repaired by Canadian hernioplasty was 7.2%. This rate is unsatisfactory, and a preperitoneal repair with a polyester prosthesis is preferred for these difficult problems. A local agent neutralized with sodium bicarbonate is the anesthetic of choice, and simultaneous left and right hernioplasties with the patient going home the same day as the procedure are now commonplace.
PubMed ID
2815796 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83663
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2007 Aug;42(8):1403-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Aasvang Eske Kvanner
Kehlet Henrik
Author Affiliation
Section of Surgical Pathophysiology, the Juliane Marie Centre, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. eskeaasvang@rh.hosp.dk
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2007 Aug;42(8):1403-8
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Health Surveys
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Pain, Postoperative - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Registries
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In contrast to the well-described 10% risk of chronic pain affecting daily activities after adult groin hernia repair, chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair has never been investigated. Studies of other childhood surgery before the age of 3 months suggest a risk of increased pain responsiveness later in life, but its potential relationship to chronic pain in adult life is unknown. METHODS: This was a nationwide detailed questionnaire study of chronic groin pain in adults having surgery for a groin hernia repair before the age of 5 years (n = 1075). RESULTS: The response rate was 63.3%. In the 651 patients available for analysis, pain from the operated groin was reported by 88 (13.5%) patients whereof 13 (2.0%) patients reported frequent and moderate or severe pain. Pain occurred primarily when exercising sports or other leisure activities. Patients operated on before the age of 3 months (n = 122) did not report groin pain more often or with higher intensity than other patients did. CONCLUSIONS: Groin pain in adult patients operated on for a groin hernia in childhood is uncommon and usually mild and occurs in relation to physical activity. Operation before the age of 3 months does not increase the risk of chronic pain.
PubMed ID
17706504 View in PubMed
Less detail

89 records – page 1 of 9.