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Adolescents' and Young Adults' Lived Experiences Following Venous Thromboembolism: "It will always lie in wait".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282460
Source
Nurs Res. 2016 Nov/Dec;65(6):455-464
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anette Arbjerg Højen
Pia S Dreyer
Deirdre A Lane
Torben Bjerregaard Larsen
Erik Elgaard Sørensen
Source
Nurs Res. 2016 Nov/Dec;65(6):455-464
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
Fear - psychology
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Male
Quality of Life - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Venous Thromboembolism - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Long-term, mental well-being of adolescence and young adults diagnosed with venous thromboembolism (VTE) as experienced by the patients has received little attention.
The purpose of this study was to explore the essential meaning of adolescents' and young adults' lived experiences following VTE to gain an in-depth understanding of their long-term, mental well-being.
Semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 Danish patients who were diagnosed with VTE in adolescence or young adulthood. Interviews were analyzed according to a phenomenological hermeneutical approach inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricœur's theory of interpretation.
Four themes emerged. Participants described an experience of a creeping loss of youth immortality, a perception of being different, to live with a body in a state of alarm, and feel symptom management insecurity.
Mental well-being of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with VTE is negatively impacted in the long term. Fear of VTE recurrence predominates and is an important source of psychological distress. This study highlights the clinical importance of including the long-term, mental well-being in the overall assessment when developing rehabilitation programs for adolescents and young adults diagnosed with VTE.
PubMed ID
27801716 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to a robot bathtub in Danish elder care: A hermeneutic interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272610
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2015 Sep;17(3):280-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Kirsten Beedholm
Kirsten Frederiksen
Anne-Marie Skovsgaard Frederiksen
Kirsten Lomborg
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2015 Sep;17(3):280-6
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Baths
Denmark
Equipment Design
Geriatric Nursing
Hermeneutics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Robotics
Abstract
In Western countries, assistive technology is implemented on a large scale in elder care settings. Only a few studies have attempted to explore the different attitudes to assistive technology among various groups of users. In this study, we investigated and explained the different attitudes among the involved leaders, nursing staff, and older people to a newly-implemented robot bathtub. Qualitative analyses of eight interviews with managers, nursing staff, and the older users revealed that the informants focused on different aspects (process, values, and functionality, respectively), used different implicit quality criteria, and ascribed different symbolic significance to the robot bathtub. Thus, the study demonstrated how attitudes toward the robot bathtub were connected to the informants' institutional role. The findings challenge the current paradigm, where technology is expected to operate as a passive tool, simply facilitating desired human acts and interactions. Further studies drawing on the epistemological and ontological perceptions of science technology studies are needed in order to understand human rationalities in the assistive technology context and to offer new insights into how technology "works" in organizations.
PubMed ID
25655980 View in PubMed
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Autonomy support and need satisfaction in prevocational programs on care farms: The self-determination theory perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279184
Source
Work. 2015;53(1):73-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lina H Ellingsen-Dalskau
Margrete Morken
Bente Berget
Ingeborg Pedersen
Source
Work. 2015;53(1):73-85
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Farms
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Nature
Norway
Personal Autonomy
Psychological Theory
Return to work
Work - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental health problems are leading causes for early and prolonged withdrawal from the workforce. Green work on care farms represents a prevocational training program intended to stimulate return to work for people with mental health problems. Research suggests that care farms may improve mental health, but there is still little knowledge of the subjective perspective of clients in green work programs.
To gain a deeper and broader understanding of the individual experiences of people with mental health problems participating in green work on care farms in Norway.
A hermeneutic phenomenological research design was applied. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted. The self-determination theory (SDT) was adapted to gain a deeper understanding of the themes that emerged in the analysis process of the interviews.
Five main themes materialize describing participants' experiences within the green work program. The main themes consist of (1) structure and flexibility, (2) understanding and acknowledgement, (3) guidance and positive feedback, (4) nature and animals, and (5) reflections on personal functioning and the future.
The main themes identified indicate a high degree of autonomy support and need satisfaction within the care farm context, which according to SDT can facilitate good human functioning, and well-being.
PubMed ID
26684706 View in PubMed
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Being active when living within a large body: experiences during lifestyle intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306618
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2020 Dec; 15(1):1736769
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Bente Skovsby Toft
Kathleen Galvin
Claus Vinther Nielsen
Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Lifestyle Rehabilitation, Horsens Regional Hospital, Brædstrup, Denmark.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2020 Dec; 15(1):1736769
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise - psychology
Existentialism
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Background: In-depth understanding of the experiences of both well-being and suffering in relation to being severely obese and becoming active through lifestyle intervention is lacking.Aim: to explore and describe adults' existential experiences of being active, when living within a large body-before and during a lifestyle intervention.Methods: A longitudinal design of repeated individual interviews with 16 adults with BMI =40, based on hermeneutic phenomenology, existential philosophy and a theory of well-being was performed. The study was approved by the Danish health authorities.Results: Two dimensions of experiences were found; "Living within a downward spiral" and "Striving for enjoyment and settlement". The themes describing suffering were: 'Sense of being thwarted and defeated ' and "Tackling energy depletion and impact of sense of self". The themes describing well-being were: "Hoping for renewal and energised resoluteness" and "Enduring discomfort and feeling safe".Conclusions: Interacting existential experiences can be facilitators or barriers for physical activity. It seems relevant for health care providers to address the individual's lifeworld experiences of well-being, lack of well-being and suffering. Well-being as a sense of feeling "at home" when physically active may break down an inactivity spiral. Promoting well-being is a legitimate aim of lifestyle intervention.
PubMed ID
32156205 View in PubMed
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Being Different but Striving to Seem Normal: The Lived Experiences of People Aged 50+ with ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312075
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2020 Jun; 41(6):476-485
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Anne Nyström
Kerstin Petersson
Ann-Christin Janlöv
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2020 Jun; 41(6):476-485
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology
Emotions
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
This qualitative study explored the day-to-day life of people aged 50+ diagnosed with ADHD. A phenomenological-hermeneutical method was chosen for the analysis. Two themes including sub-themes were revealed. The first theme, Being different and trying to handle my inner self, concerned emotional self-regulation, emotional resilience, social skills, and personal resource management. The second theme, Trying to adapt to fit in with people around me, concerned relationships, work, and personal finances. The comprehensive understanding was interpreted as Being different but striving to seem normal.
PubMed ID
32267788 View in PubMed
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Consequences of Needle-Related Medical Procedures: A Hermeneutic Study With Young Children (3-7 Years).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280471
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2016 Mar-Apr;31(2):e109-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katarina Karlsson
Ingela Rydström
Maria Nyström
Karin Enskär
Ann-Charlotte Dalheim Englund
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2016 Mar-Apr;31(2):e109-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anxiety - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - methods - psychology
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Needles - adverse effects
Pain - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs) are often frightening and cause children anxiety and pain. Only a few studies have examined the perspectives of younger children. More knowledge is needed about younger children's experiences in caring situations such as NRMPs.
The aim of this study was to explain and understand the consequences related to NRMPs from younger children's perspectives.
Participant observations and interviews with younger children who had experienced NRMPs were analysed using a lifeworld hermeneutic approach.
Experiencing fear is central for younger children during an NRMP and interpretation of its consequences formed the basis for the following themes: seeking security, realizing the adult's power, struggling for control, feeling ashamed, and surrendering. A comprehensive understanding is presented wherein younger children's experiences of NRMPs vary across time and space related to weakening and strengthening their feelings of fear.
Awareness is needed that adults' power becomes more obvious for children during an NRMP. Children's surrender does not necessarily imply acceptance of the procedure. Providing children with opportunities to control elements of the procedure creates a foundation for active participation, and vice versa.
PubMed ID
26603292 View in PubMed
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The core of love when caring for patients suffering from addiction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290162
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):353-60
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Kari M Thorkildsen
Katie Eriksson
Maj-Britt Råholm
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, Stord/Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):353-60
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Empathy
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Love
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Care - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - nursing
Abstract
Drug addiction is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the core of love when caring for patients suffering from addiction. The study had a hermeneutical approach. Four nurses working at a detoxification unit were interviewed. Data were interpreted using a hermeneutical text interpretation based on Gadamer's hermeneutics. The results revealed the core of love in four dimensions: love as an inner driving force, searching for the human being behind the addiction, faith in the inner power of human beings and love as a movement of giving and receiving. The hermeneutical interpretation revealed the core of love as sacrifice, showing that sacrifice is an ethical dimension and that sacrifice involves searching for the patient's ontological suffering. Sacrifice is connected to faith, and faith in love is decisive for a life without drugs. Sacrifice involves being mutual gifts to one another, a self-reinforcing motion of sacrifice that energizes the nurses to go on with their work.
PubMed ID
25250789 View in PubMed
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Dealing with existential anxiety in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study of patients' lived experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273004
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2015 Sep;24(17-18):2581-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Charlotte P Simonÿ
Birthe D Pedersen
Pia Dreyer
Regner Birkelund
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2015 Sep;24(17-18):2581-90
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Anxiety Disorders
Denmark
Exercise Therapy
Female
Focus Groups
Hermeneutics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To investigate patients' lived experiences of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.
Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is used to enable patients with cardiac problems to move forward to lead satisfying lives. However, knowledge of patients' concerns while they follow the current programmes is sparse.
This study, which included nine men and two women with unstable angina pectoris and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, used a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach.
The patients were followed by field observations during exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Focus group interviews were conducted at the programme end, and individual interviews were performed one to two months later. The interpretation comprised three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis, and comprehensive interpretation and discussion.
Although both physically and psychologically challenged, the patients were encouraged to maintain an active lifestyle. Three themes were identified: anxiety regarding exercise, whereby the patients are initially insecure about how to behave with their diseased hearts; encouragement from training together, whereby the patients support each other in exercising; and growing confidence in the heart, whereby the patients enjoy being physically active.
In exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation, patients' insecurity with respect to their heart disease is revealed as an existential anxiety. Through peer support and a positive physical perception, the patients gain renewed self-efficacy, helping them to continue their lives in an active and satisfying way.
Knowing that patients are confronted with an existential anxiety during exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is important because it requires specific care. Recognising this anxiety also highlights how participating in the programme can be very demanding, which can help us understand aspects of adherence problems. Of greatest importance is that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation enables patients to find a new foothold, which comprises enjoying being physically active.
PubMed ID
25988741 View in PubMed
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The delivery room: is it a safe place? A hermeneutic analysis of women's negative birth experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264456
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2014 Dec;5(4):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Christina Nilsson
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2014 Dec;5(4):199-204
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Delivery Rooms
Delivery of Health Care
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Fear
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Midwifery
Nurse-Patient Relations
Parturition - psychology
Perinatal care
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Safety
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
Women's negative experiences in the delivery room can have significance for later fear of childbirth. Therefore, it is important to critically evaluate the care during childbirth. The aim was to gain a deeper understanding of women's negative experiences in the delivery room.
This study is based on original data from three qualitative studies on Swedish women's experiences of fear of childbirth. Data were collected from interviews with 21 women; 15 pregnant women (6?+?9) with intense fear of childbirth, and six women who had experienced intense fear of childbirth 7-11 years prior to the interview. The analysis had a hermeneutic approach, with focus on the women's descriptions of their previous negative birth experiences.
The interpretation showed that in the delivery room the women were objects of surveillance, and they endured suffering related to the care during childbirth. This involves experiences of midwives as uncaring, feelings of being suppressed, unprotected and lacking safety, of feeling disconnected and of the body as incompetent in giving birth. The birth environments are understood as power structures, containing views of women's birthing bodies as machines, and delivery rooms as surveillance environments, involving interventions such as foetal heart monitoring, induction and augmentation of labour.
The delivery room was, for these women, a place creating fear of childbirth. To avoid negative birth experiences and future fear, women must be offered not only medical, but also emotional and existential safety in the delivery room.
PubMed ID
25433832 View in PubMed
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Dignity work of older women caring for a husband with dementia at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310632
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2019 10; 40(10):1047-1069
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2019
Author
Oscar Tranvåg
Dagfinn Nåden
Ann Gallagher
Author Affiliation
Centre for Elderly and Nursing Home Medicine, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2019 10; 40(10):1047-1069
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - nursing - psychology
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Personal Autonomy
Personhood
Qualitative Research
Respect
Self Concept
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
In this study, we explored perceptions of dignity, and sources preserving dignity of six older Norwegian women caring for a home-dwelling husband with dementia. Through hermeneutic interpretation of in-depth interviews, "having personal integrity," "mastering everyday life," and "giving of one self" were identified as crucial intrapersonal aspects of dignity - while "acknowledging worthiness and uniqueness of each human being" was found to be an essential interpersonal aspect. Nine dignity-preserving sources identified suggests that the wives engaged in "dignity work" to preserve their own dignity as a caregiver, as well as to safeguard the dignity of their husbands who were vulnerable to dignity loss.
PubMed ID
30913004 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.