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Abdominal aortic diameter is increased in males with a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms: results from the Danish VIVA-trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260407
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
T M M Joergensen
K. Houlind
A. Green
J S Lindholt
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - epidemiology - genetics - ultrasonography
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dilatation, Pathologic
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pedigree
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between participants with male and female relatives with AAA.
Observational population-based cross-sectional study.
18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter.
Standardized ultrasound scan measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication.
From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative diagnosed with AAA, and 38 had AAA. Participants with a family history of AAA (+FH) had a significantly larger mean maximum aortic diameter (20.50 mm) compared with participants without family history of AAA (-FH) (19.07 mm, p
PubMed ID
25443525 View in PubMed
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Age at detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms in siblings of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275171
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2016 Apr;63(4):883-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Anneli Linné
Johan Forsberg
David Lindström
Ester Ideskog
Rebecka Hultgren
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2016 Apr;63(4):883-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - epidemiology - genetics - ultrasonography
Dilatation, Pathologic
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Few countries offer organized screening of siblings of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), although a hereditary trait is well known to exist. Male relatives, but not female, are invited within the population-based screening programs for elderly men in Sweden. Evidence regarding the optimal age to screen siblings is scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the age at detection in siblings found with AAAs.
All patients treated for AAAs in two Swedish counties were screened for siblings. Consenting siblings aged 80 and younger were examined (N = 529) with ultrasound and were interviewed per protocol.
In the cohort of 529 siblings to AAA patients, 53 siblings were diagnosed with AAAs (sisters 16/276 [5.8%] and brothers 37/253 [14.6%]). The prevalence of AAAs in the siblings 65 years of age or younger was 16/207 (7.7%). One-third of the siblings found with AAAs were young (16/53 [30%]). Among the young siblings with AAAs, 8/16 (50%) had an aneurysm larger than 50 mm or were already surgically treated. The prevalence of AAAs in siblings older than 65 years of age was 37/322 (12%).
The AAA prevalence in this sibling cohort is strikingly high compared to the prevalence in the population (in Sweden, 1.4%-2.2% in 65-year-old men). The young ages among diagnosed siblings reinforce that male siblings of AAA patients should be screened before age 65 (before the population-based program) and that structured programs for female siblings are called for.
PubMed ID
26826057 View in PubMed
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Allergic diseases and asthma in the family predict the persistence and onset-age of asthma: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268440
Source
Respir Res. 2014;15:152
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Elina M S Paaso
Maritta S Jaakkola
Aino K Rantala
Timo T Hugg
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Source
Respir Res. 2014;15:152
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Odds Ratio
Pedigree
Phenotype
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Family history of asthma and other allergic diseases have been linked to the risk of childhood asthma previously, but little is known about their effect on the age-of-onset and persistency of asthma until young adulthood.
We assessed the effect of the family history of asthma and allergic diseases on persistent vs. transient, and early- vs. late-onset persistent asthma in The Espoo Cohort Study 1991-2011, a population-based cohort study of 1623 subjects (follow-up rate 63.2%). The determinants were any family history (any parent or sibling); maternal; paternal; siblings only; parents only; and both siblings and parents. Analyses were conducted separately for asthma and allergic diseases while taking the other disease into account as a confounding factor. The outcomes were persistent, transient, early-onset persistent (
Notes
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Erratum In: Respir Res. 2015;16:3625849811
PubMed ID
25427760 View in PubMed
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Arthrogryposis syndrome (Kuskokwim disease) in the Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1935
Source
Journal of the American Medical Association. JAMA. 1969 Sep 8;209(10):1481-6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
  1 website  
Author
Petajan, J.H.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Journal of the American Medical Association. JAMA. 1969 Sep 8;209(10):1481-6.
Date
1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Joint contracture
Kuskokwim disease (Arthrogryposis syndrome)
Heredity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2671.
Online Resources
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Colorblindness and gene flow in Alaskans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 25:564-566.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Adam, A.
Author Affiliation
University School of Medicine (Tel-Hashomer, Israel)
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 25:564-566.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Kotzebue
Nome
Bethel
Kodiak
Color blindness
Heredity
Boarding school
Alaska
Color Vision Defects - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group
Genes
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Selection (Genetics)
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2463.
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Comparison of family history of sudden cardiac death in nonischemic and ischemic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122678
Source
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2012 Aug 1;5(4):757-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2012
Author
Eeva Hookana
M Juhani Junttila
Kari S Kaikkonen
Olavi Ukkola
Y Antero Kesäniemi
Marja-Leena Kortelainen
Heikki V Huikuri
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. eeva.hookana@oulu.fi
Source
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2012 Aug 1;5(4):757-61
Date
Aug-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Autopsy
Chi-Square Distribution
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - genetics - mortality
Heredity
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - genetics - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - genetics - mortality
Odds Ratio
Pedigree
Phenotype
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Recent studies have identified the presence of familial clustering of ischemic sudden cardiac death (SCD) as a clinical expression of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to determine whether nonischemic SCD has a similar familial background, which would be evidence of a genetic predisposition.
The retrospective case-control study included (1) consecutive victims of nonischemic SCD (n=223), (2) consecutive victims of ischemic SCD (n=596), whose deaths and diagnosis were verified at medicolegal autopsy, and (3) control subjects without heart disease (n=475). In each study group, the family history of SCD among the first-degree relatives was determined and verified from death certificates. The prevalence of SCD in =1 first-degree relative was significantly higher in victims of ischemic (34.2%) than nonischemic SCD (13.4%; P
PubMed ID
22787009 View in PubMed
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Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101848
Source
Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2011 Apr;294(4):676-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
James Cray
Mark P Mooney
Michael I Siegel
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 530 45th Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15201, USA. James.Cray@chp.edu
Source
Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2011 Apr;294(4):676-82
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Anthropology, Physical
Cranial Sutures - pathology
Craniosynostoses - ethnology - genetics - pathology
Genotype
Heredity
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Phenotype
Abstract
Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations.
PubMed ID
21328563 View in PubMed
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Cryptorchidism concordance in monozygotic and dizygotic twin brothers, full brothers, and half-brothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99082
Source
Fertil Steril. 2010 Jan;93(1):124-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Morten Søndergaard Jensen
Gunnar Toft
Ane Marie Thulstrup
Tine Brink Henriksen
Jørn Olsen
Kaare Christensen
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten@sondergaard-jensen.dk
Source
Fertil Steril. 2010 Jan;93(1):124-9
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptorchidism - genetics - surgery
Denmark
Environment
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Orchiopexy
Pedigree
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study concordance rates of cryptorchidism (undescended testis) in pairs of boys with varying family structure, to evaluate the risk contribution from the intrauterine environment and genetic factors. DESIGN: Population based study of 1,024,500 Danish boys born from January 1, 1973 to December 31, 2004. Classic twin method and computerized square dance design. SETTING: Hospitals and outpatient clinics. PATIENT(S): Six groups of boy pairs: boys with no relation, paternal half-brothers, maternal half-brothers, full brothers, dizygotic twin brothers, and monozygotic twin brothers. INTERVENTION(S): Observational study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Status on each individual regarding cryptorchidism and orchiopexy from the Danish National Patient Register. RESULT(S): Concordance rates of cryptorchidism in the groups were as follows: boys with no relation 3.2% (95% confidence interval 2.7%-3.6%), paternal half-brothers 3.4% (2.3%-4.7%), maternal half-brothers 6.0% (4.5%-7.7%), full brothers 8.8% (8.3%-9.8%), dizygotic twin brothers 24.1% (16.0%-33.6%), and monozygotic twin brothers 27.3% (15.5%-41.2%). CONCLUSION(S): The concordance rate was higher in maternal than in paternal half-brothers, and much higher but of equal magnitude in both twin groups. The findings strongly support that the intrauterine environment and maternal inheritance are contributing to the occurrence of cryptorchidism.
PubMed ID
19022430 View in PubMed
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Disaccharide malabsorption and dietary patterns in two Canadian Eskimo communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature754
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1978 Aug;31(8):1473-1478.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1978
Author
Ellestad-Sayed, J.J.
Haworth, J.C.
Hildes, J.A.
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1978 Aug;31(8):1473-1478.
Date
Aug-1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Chesterfield Inlet
Heredity
Repulse Bay
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Humans
Inuits
Lactose Intolerance - epidemiology
Lactose Tolerance Test
Malabsorption Syndromes - epidemiology
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Sucrose - diagnostic use - metabolism
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2247.
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Dyslipidemia of mothers with familial hypercholesterolemia deteriorates lipids in adult offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140540
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Dec;30(12):2673-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Anouk van der Graaf
Maud N Vissers
Daniel Gaudet
Diane Brisson
Suthesh Sivapalaratnam
Tessa J Roseboom
Angelique C M Jansen
John J P Kastelein
Barbara A Hutten
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Dec;30(12):2673-7
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II - blood - genetics
Lipid Metabolism - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Pedigree
Phenotype
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - genetics
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Up-Regulation
Young Adult
Abstract
It is unknown whether elevated maternal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels lead to dyslipidemia in the offspring. Because this could have important consequences for cardiovascular prevention in mother and child, we explored the relationship between maternal familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and lipids in adult offspring.
In a large cohort of both Dutch and Canadian origin, we compared lipid profiles between patients, aged 18 to 85 years, who inherited FH maternally (n=1069) and those who inherited FH paternally (n=1270). This relationship was evaluated using multivariate regression analyses. Levels of total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, and apolipoprotein B 100 (ApoB100) were significantly elevated in patients who inherited FH maternally compared with patients who inherited FH paternally (adjusted differences in TC: 0.156 mmol/L, P=0.037; LDL-C: 0.187 mmol/L, P=0.012; ApoB: 0.064 g/L, P=0.022).
Our data show that maternal hereditary hypercholesterolemia slightly increases TC, LDL-C, and ApoB levels in their offspring later in life. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations still require elucidation, our data suggest that maternal hypercholesterolemia during pregnancy may program lipid metabolism to a certain extent in the fetus.
PubMed ID
20864670 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.