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2nd-generation HIV surveillance and injecting drug use: uncovering the epidemiological ice-berg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84543
Source
Int J Public Health. 2007;52(3):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Reintjes Ralf
Wiessing Lucas
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Faculty Life Sciences, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Hamburg, Germany. Ralf.Reintjes@rzbd.haw-hamburg.de
Source
Int J Public Health. 2007;52(3):166-72
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Europe - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Turkey - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: HIV/AIDS surveillance methods are under revision as the diversity of HIV epidemics is becoming more apparent. The so called "2nd generation surveillance (SGS) systems" aim to enhance surveillance by broadening the range of indicators to prevalence, behaviors and correlates, for a better understanding and a more complete and timely awareness of evolving epidemics. METHODS: Concepts of HIV SGS are reviewed with a special focus on injecting drug users, a major at-risk and hard to reach group in Europe, a region with mainly low or concentrated epidemics. RESULTS: The scope of HIV/AIDS surveillance needs to be broadened following principles of SGS. Specifically for IDUs we propose including hepatitis C data as indicator for injecting risk in routine systems like those monitoring sexually transmitted infections and information on knowledge and attitudes as potential major determinants of risk behavior. CONCLUSIONS: The suggested approach should lead to more complete and timely information for public health interventions, however there is a clear need for comparative validation studies to assess the validity, reliability and cost-effectiveness of traditional and enhanced HIV/AIDS surveillance systems.
PubMed ID
17958283 View in PubMed
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A 25-year follow-up study of drug addicts hospitalised for acute hepatitis: present and past morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7324
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanne Rogne Gjeruldsen
Bjørn Myrvang
Stein Opjordsmoen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. s.m.r.gieruldsen@iwoks.uio.no
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Rehabilitation, Vocational - statistics & numerical data
Skin Diseases, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Environment
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate present and past morbidity in drug addicts, 25 years after hospitalisation for acute hepatitis B or hepatitis nonA-nonB. The hospital records for 214 consecutively admitted patients were analysed, and a follow-up study on 66 of the 144 patients still alive was performed. At follow-up, 1 of 54 (1.8%) hepatitis B patients was still HBsAg positive. Twelve patients originally diagnosed as hepatitis nonA-nonB were all among 54 found to be anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) positive, and the total anti-HCV prevalence was 81.8%. Twelve (22.2%) of the HCV cases were unknown before the follow-up examination. Four (6.1%) participants were anti-human immunodeficiency virus positive, only 1 was on antiretroviral therapy, and none had developed AIDS. Other chronic somatic diseases were a minor problem, whereas drug users reported skin infections as a frequent complication. Forty-three patients (65%) had abandoned addictive drugs since the hospital stay. Serious mental disorders were reported by 19 patients (28.8%), and 17 (25.8%) regarded themselves as present (9) and former (8) compulsive alcohol drinkers. A large proportion of the participants were granted disability pension (39%), a majority because of psychiatric disorders, drug and alcohol abuse.
PubMed ID
12644734 View in PubMed
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Access and utilization of HIV treatment and services among women sex workers in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174373
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Sep;82(3):488-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Kate Shannon
Vicki Bright
Janice Duddy
Mark W Tyndall
Author Affiliation
BC Centre for Excellence in HIV AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6Z 1Y6.
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Sep;82(3):488-97
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - utilization
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - therapy
Health Services Accessibility
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Prostitution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
Many HIV-infected women are not realizing the benefits of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) despite significant advancements in treatment. Women in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES) are highly marginalized and struggle with multiple morbidities, unstable housing, addiction, survival sex, and elevated risk of sexual and drug-related harms, including HIV infection. Although recent studies have identified the heightened risk of HIV infection among women engaged in sex work and injection drug use, the uptake of HIV care among this population has received little attention. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the needs of women engaged in survival sex work and to assess utilization and acceptance of HAART. During November 2003, a baseline needs assessment was conducted among 159 women through a low-threshold drop-in centre servicing street-level sex workers in Vancouver. Cross-sectional data were used to describe the sociodemographic characteristics, drug use patterns, HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing and status, and attitudes towards HAART. High rates of cocaine injection, heroin injection, and smokeable crack cocaine use reflect the vulnerable and chaotic nature of this population. Although preliminary findings suggest an overall high uptake of health and social services, there was limited attention to HIV care with only 9% of the women on HAART. Self-reported barriers to accessing treatment were largely attributed to misinformation and misconceptions about treatment. Given the acceptability of accessing HAART through community interventions and women specific services, this study highlights the potential to reach this highly marginalized group and provides valuable baseline information on a population that has remained largely outside consistent HIV care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15944404 View in PubMed
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Acute hepatitis A, B and non-A, non-B in a Swedish community studied over a ten-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57000
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1982;14(4):253-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
A. Widell
B G Hansson
T. Moestrup
Z. Serléus
L R Mathiesen
T. Johnsson
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1982;14(4):253-9
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epidemiologic Methods
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis, Viral, Human - epidemiology
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
985 episodes of hepatitis representing 98% of all acute hepatitis episodes found in a Swedish city during a 10-year period were analyzed for anti-hepatitis A IgM antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigen. Hepatitis A was diagnosed in 311 episodes (32%), hepatitis B in 494 (50%), simultaneous acute hepatitis A and B in 12 (1.2%), and 168 episodes (17%) were classified as hepatitis non-A, non-B. The majority of the hepatitis A cases were drug addicts (58%), and all were concentrated in 3 outbreaks of 1-2 years duration. 16% of all hepatitis A cases were probably imported. Hepatitis B cases decreased significantly (p less than 0.001) between the first and second half of the study period. 47% were drug addicts. Hepatitis non-A, non-B was also dominated by drug addicts (61%). Approximately 20% of the cases in all 3 types of hepatitis had no identifiable source.
PubMed ID
6819637 View in PubMed
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Acute non-A, non-B hepatitis in Norway. Clinical, epidemiological, and immunological characteristics in comparsion with hepatitis A.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12934
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1982 Aug;17(5):593-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982
Author
S S Frøoland
A N Teien
J C Ulstrup
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1982 Aug;17(5):593-9
Date
Aug-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Comparative Study
Female
Hepatitis A - epidemiology
Hepatitis B - epidemiology
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis, Viral, Human - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Male
Norway
Abstract
Serological analysis by radioimunoassay of sera from 297 patients hospitalized with acute non-toxic hepatitis was used for classification according to virus etiology. Radioimmunoassays included tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs), antibody to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV), anti-HAV of IgM class, and antibody against cytomegalovirus (GMV) and Epstein-Barr virus. One patient with a significant rise in anti-CMV antibodies was classified as having CMV hepatitis. Among the 296 remaining patients serological markers indicated hepatitis A in 51 cases (17.2%) and hepatitis B in 208 cases (70.3%). The remaining 37 patients (12.5%) fulfilled criteria for acute non-A, non-B hepatitis. This type of hepatitis had symptoms and signs indistinguishable from those of hepatitis A, except for a slight tendency to milder disease on admission. A considerable proportion of patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis had a history of drug abuse (43.2%) and of recently traveling to endemic hepatitis areas (29.7%). In the remaining 27.1% no particular background was revealed. No case of post-transfusion hepatitis was seen. During the last 6 months of the study a striking change in epidemiology concerning hepatitis A was seen, apparently caused by a steep increase in the incidence of this type of hepatitis among drug addicts. No significant difference in biochemical liver tests was seen in non-a, non-B hepatitis or hepatitis A. In contrast, a marked and statistically significant difference in serum concentrations of IgM was found, with higher values (mean, 7.5 g/1; range, 3.2-13.9 g/1) in hepatitis A than in non-a, non-B hepatitis (mean, 3.3 g/1; range, 0.9-9.4 g/1). This difference may have diagnostic value.
PubMed ID
6817410 View in PubMed
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[Acute viral hepatitis, non-A, non-B type in a hepatological department Copenhagen Hepatitis Acuta Program]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57026
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1979 Dec 10;141(50):3434-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1979

[An epidemiological evaluation of the incidence of detecting markers of hepatitis B and C viral infection in the blood of the medical personnel of a large general hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208490
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1997 May-Jun;(3):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
V G Akimkin
B N Lytsar'
S V Skvortsov
L M Samokhodskaia
I V Aristarkhova
I A Symakova
E K D'iachuk
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1997 May-Jun;(3):36-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B Core Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - blood
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis C Antibodies - blood
Hospitals, General
Humans
Incidence
Medical Staff, Hospital
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Russia - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Virus hepatitis B and C are widespread human diseases of viral etiology, characterized by a common mechanism of the transmission of their etiological agents. The study of the routes of transmission of these infections in hospitals and the epidemiological characterization of the occurrence of the markers of hepatitis B and C among the medical personnel working in therapeutic and prophylactic institutions (TPI) are highly important problems. The data obtained in our investigations make it possible to determine the irregular character of the detection rate of the markers of virus infection among the medical personnel in different departments of a large hospital and to give explanation for such irregularity. A high morbidity rate in virus hepatitis B and C among the medical personnel continues to be one of serious problem facing TPI, and the improvement of the methods of their prevention is still a highly important task of hospital epidemiology.
PubMed ID
9304325 View in PubMed
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260 records – page 1 of 26.