Skip header and navigation

Refine By

94 records – page 1 of 10.

[A case of the combined course of viral hepatitis B and C with mechanical jaundice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21400
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Jul-Aug;(5):146-8
Publication Type
Article

Access to sterile injecting equipment is more important than awareness of HCV status for injection risk behaviors among drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152406
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(4):548-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Joseph Cox
Carole Morissette
Prithwish De
Claude Tremblay
Robert Allard
Lisa Graves
Randolph Stephenson
Elise Roy
Author Affiliation
Direction de Santé publique, Agence de la Santé et des services Sociaux de Montreal, Montreal, Canada. jcox@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(4):548-68
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hepatitis C - complications - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Methadone
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs
Quebec
Risk-Taking
Social Support
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology - virology
Abstract
Awareness of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection status is expected to influence risk behaviors. In 2004-2005, injection drug users (IDUs) recruited from syringe exchange programs (SEPs) and methadone clinics in Montreal, Canada, were interviewed on drug use behaviors (past 6 months) and HCV testing. Subjects (n = 230) were classified as low/intermediate risk (20.4% borrowed drug preparation equipment only) and high risk (19.6% borrowed syringes), and 54.5% reported being HCV positive. Logistic regression modeling showed that compared to no risk (60% borrowed nothing), low/intermediate risk was associated with fewer noninjecting social network members, poor physical health, and problems obtaining sterile injecting equipment. High risk was associated with all of these factors except social networks. HCV status was not associated with any level of risk. Improved access to sterile injecting equipment may be more important than knowledge of HCV status in reducing injection risks among this IDU population. The study limitations are noted and recommendations discussed.
Notes
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1998;18 Suppl 1:S57-99663625
Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2007 May;18(3):204-1217689367
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 1998 Aug 1;51(3):253-63; discussion 267-89787998
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 1998 Oct 16;47(RR-19):1-399790221
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Jul 31;319(7205):290-110426739
Cites: Hepatology. 1999 Sep;30(3):794-80010462388
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Nov 2;141(9):715-715520428
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 2000 Mar 1;61(5):1409-1610735346
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2000 May;16(5):439-4510997831
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Jan;91(1):42-611189822
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2001 Feb 1;61(3):211-511164684
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Apr 1;155(7):645-5311914192
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2002 Aug 15;30(5):514-2112154342
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;35(7):783-812228813
Cites: Addiction. 2002 Oct;97(10):1277-8712359032
Cites: Addiction. 2002 Oct;97(10):1289-9412359033
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2002 Dec 1;186(11):1558-6412447730
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Feb;56(3):465-7612570967
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Mar 16;140(6):462-415023712
Cites: Addiction. 2004 May;99(5):621-3315078237
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Nov;59(9):1807-1815312916
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2004 Oct 15;190(8):1396-40315378431
Cites: Am Psychol. 1984 Nov;39(11):1297-3026507993
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Sep;47(9):1102-141329589
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1995 Nov;85(11):1531-77485666
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1996 Jun 1;12(2):202-78680893
Cites: J Viral Hepat. 2005 May;12(3):322-415850474
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2006 Nov-Dec;121(6):710-917278406
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 2007 Jan;18(1):23-717326858
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 1998 Oct;33(12):2403-239781822
PubMed ID
19242863 View in PubMed
Less detail

After Toronto, 46th ICAAC offers back to basics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164419
Source
IAPAC Mon. 2006 Oct;12(10):354-65
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Keith Alcorn
Edwin J Bernard
Michael Carter
Adam Legge
Mark Mascolini
Derek Thaczuk
Source
IAPAC Mon. 2006 Oct;12(10):354-65
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - drug therapy
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Cholesterol - blood
Disease Progression
Drug Resistance, Viral
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy
Hepatitis C - complications
Humans
Ontario
Receptors, CCR5 - immunology
Abstract
After the marathon-like challenge presented by the 16th International AIDS Conference held in Toronto a month prior--a challenge that tested the stamina of even the youngest and fittest of conference-goers--the 46th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), held September 27-30, 2006, in San Francisco, was a welcome relief in its staid and singular focus on the presentation of data offering insights into the challenges a variety of patients and their physicians are facing in the second decade of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), as well as reviews of how to make optimal use of antiretroviral regimens constructed from within the existing HAART armamentarium. The big news at this year's ICAAC, however, was on the antiretroviral pipeline, with previews of how a new generation of drugs may help make the difference between life and death for countless millions of men, women, and children living with HIV/AIDS.
PubMed ID
17390499 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and drug use prior to liver transplantation: more common than expected in patients with non-alcoholic liver disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309267
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2019 Sep; 54(9):1146-1154
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Andreas Schult
Knut Stokkeland
Bo-Göran Ericzon
Rolf Hultcrantz
Johan Franck
Per Stål
Maria Castedal
Author Affiliation
The Transplant Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital , Gothenburg , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2019 Sep; 54(9):1146-1154
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - diagnosis
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - complications - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Users - statistics & numerical data
End Stage Liver Disease - complications - therapy
Female
Hepatitis C - complications - therapy
Humans
Liver Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Objective: Liver transplantation (LT) is a life-saving procedure for patients with end-stage liver disease, acute liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with known alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) are usually assessed by an addiction specialist, but patients with other liver diseases may also exhibit harmful drinking. This study aims to assess the drinking habits in LT-recipients with or without a diagnosis of ALC. Patients and methods: Between April 2012 and December 2015, 190 LT-recipients were interviewed using the Lifetime Drinking History (LDH) and the Addiction Severity Index (ASI). Patients were categorized according to their diagnoses: ALC (group A, n?=?39), HCC or hepatitis C (group B, n?=?56) or other liver diseases (group C, n?=?95). Data were analysed using descriptive statistic methods. Results: Fifteen of 95 patients (15.8%) in group C - a cohort without suspected addiction problems - had either alcohol consumption or binge drinking within the upper quartile of the overall cohort. The aetiology of liver disease in this subgroup included mainly cholestatic and cryptogenic liver disease. Illicit drugs had been used by 35% of all patients. Cannabis and amphetamine were the most common drugs and had the longest duration of regular use. Conclusions: LT candidates without known alcohol or drug use may have a clinically significant consumption of alcohol and previous illicit drug use. Efforts should be put on identification of these patients during LT evaluation. The use of structured questionnaires such as the ASI and the LDH could facilitate detection of alcohol and drug problems.
PubMed ID
31453745 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to hepatitic C virus and chronic liver disease among Finnish patients with haemophilia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227976
Source
Ann Med. 1990 Dec;22(6):393-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
F. Ebeling
V. Rasi
R. Naukkarinen
J. Leikola
Author Affiliation
Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 1990 Dec;22(6):393-6
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alanine Transaminase - analysis
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Factor VIII - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Hemophilia A - complications - drug therapy - enzymology
Hepacivirus - immunology
Hepatitis B - complications - enzymology
Hepatitis B Core Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis C - complications - enzymology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Antibodies to hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B serology and liver enzymes were examined in 137 Finnish haemophiliac patients to detect signs of chronic viral hepatitis and its possible aetiological associations. The prevalence of raised alanine aminotransferase values was 37%. These were significantly associated with hepatitis C seropositivity but not with hepatitis B antibodies, severity of haemophilia or the type of clotting factor used in replacement therapy. The prevalence of hepatitis C seropositivity was 50%; it was significantly associated with severe haemophilia and with the use of large pool concentrates. The hepatitis C virus seems to be the major cause of chronic liver disease transmitted by clotting factors also in Finland, despite a somewhat lower seroprevalence than described elsewhere so far.
PubMed ID
1963789 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiretroviral treatment interruption leads to progression of liver fibrosis in HIV-hepatitis C virus co-infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136924
Source
AIDS. 2011 Apr 24;25(7):967-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2011
Author
Julia Thorpe
Sahar Saeed
Erica E M Moodie
Marina B Klein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Divisions of Infectious Diseases/Immunodeficiency, Royal Victoria Hospital, Canada.
Source
AIDS. 2011 Apr 24;25(7):967-75
Date
Apr-24-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes
Canada
Disease Progression
Female
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - immunology
HIV-1
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis C - complications - drug therapy - immunology
Humans
Liver - immunology
Liver Cirrhosis - etiology - immunology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Viral Load
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Despite potential negative consequences, HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients may discontinue antiretroviral treatment (ART) for several reasons. We examined the impact of ART interruption on liver fibrosis progression in co-infected adults, using the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) as a surrogate marker of liver fibrosis.
Data were analyzed from a multisite prospective cohort of 541 HIV-HCV co-infected adults. ART interruption was included as a time-updated variable and defined as the cessation of all antiretrovirals for at least 14 days. The primary endpoint was the development of an APRI score at least 1.5. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression and inverse probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) in a marginal structural model were used to evaluate the association of baseline and time-varying covariates with developing significant fibrosis.
Patients were followed for a median of 1.02 years; 10% (n = 53) interrupted ART and 10% (n = 53) developed significant fibrosis. After accounting for potential confounders, including CD4 T-cell count, HIV viral load, baseline APRI score, age and gender, the hazard ratio for ART interruption was 2.52 (95% confidence interval 1.20-5.28). Use of IPTW resulted in a similar effect estimate, suggesting that mediation by time-varying confounders was negligible.
ART interruption was associated with an increased risk of fibrosis progression in HIV-HCV co-infection that was only partially accounted for by HIV viral load and CD4 T-cell counts. Our findings suggest that liver disease progression observed in ART-treated co-infected patients is partly due to the consequences of treatment interruptions.
PubMed ID
21330904 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers to hepatitis C virus treatment in a Canadian HIV-hepatitis C virus coinfection tertiary care clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158621
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):133-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
M. McLaren
G. Garber
C. Cooper
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):133-7
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Cohort Studies
Female
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - psychology
Health Services Accessibility
Hepatitis C - complications - drug therapy - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Refusal - psychology
Abstract
Despite demonstrated efficacy in HIV-hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, not all patients initiate, complete or achieve success with HCV antiviral therapy.
All HIV-HCV coinfected patient consults received at The Ottawa Hospital Viral Hepatitis Clinic (Ottawa, Ontario) between June 2000 and September 2006 were identified using a clinical database. A descriptive analysis of primary and contributing factors accounting for why patients did not initiate HCV therapy, as well as the therapeutic outcomes of treated patients, was conducted.
One hundred two consults were received. Sixty-seven per cent of patients did not initiate HCV therapy. The key primary reasons included: HIV therapy was more urgently needed (22%), loss to follow-up (12%), patients were deemed unlikely to progress to advanced liver disease (18%) and patient refusal (12%). Many patients had secondary factors contributing to the decision not to treat, including substance abuse (23%) and psychiatric illness (14%). Overall, 59% of untreated patients (40 of 68) were eventually lost to follow-up. Thirty-three per cent of referred patients started HCV therapy. Twenty-seven of 42 courses (64%) were interrupted prematurely for reasons such as virological nonresponse (48%), psychiatric complications (10%) and physical side effects (7%). Of all treatment recipients, 12 of 42 full courses of therapy were completed and three remained on HCV medication. Overall, eight of the 102 coinfected patients studied (8%) achieved a sustained virological response.
Not all HIV-HCV coinfected patients who are deemed to be in need of HCV treatment are initiating therapy. Only a minority of patients who do receive treatment achieve success. Implementation of HIV treatment, patient retention, attention to substance abuse and mental health care should be the focus of efforts designed to increase HCV treatment uptake and success. This can be best achieved within a multidisciplinary model of health care delivery.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Jan 5;283(1):74-8010632283
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Jul 29;351(5):438-5015282351
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Jul 15;33(2):240-711418885
Cites: J Viral Hepat. 2007 Mar;14(3):183-817305884
Cites: AIDS Care. 2006 Oct;18(7):830-816971295
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Sep;30(9):1520-616930214
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 2006 Aug 1;32(15):165-7416897908
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Jul 1;41 Suppl 1:S83-816265621
Cites: AIDS. 2005 Oct;19 Suppl 3:S208-1416251820
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 15;40 Suppl 5:S362-615768349
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 15;40 Suppl 5:S355-6115768348
Cites: J Viral Hepat. 2005 Jan;12(1):86-9015655053
Cites: Hepatology. 1999 Oct;30(4):1054-810498659
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1999 May;179(5):1254-810191232
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Jul-Aug;95(4):272-715362469
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Jul 29;351(5):451-915282352
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Jan 1;36(1):97-10012491208
Cites: Hepatology. 2002 Nov;36(5 Suppl 1):S201-912407595
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;21(3):179-8217377647
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Aug 15;33(4):562-911462196
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Apr 1;34(7):984-9011880965
PubMed ID
18299730 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 01 23; 138(2):
Publication Type
Editorial
Date
01-23-2018

A Canadian multicenter retrospective study evaluating transjugular liver biopsy in patients with congenital bleeding disorders and hepatitis C: is it safe and useful?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176403
Source
Am J Hematol. 2005 Feb;78(2):85-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Jennifer L Shin
Jerome Teitel
Mark G Swain
Vincent G Bain
Paul C Adams
Kenneth Croitoru
Kevork Peltekian
Frank Schweiger
Martin E Simons
E Jenny Heathcote
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine at University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Hematol. 2005 Feb;78(2):85-93
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biopsy - adverse effects - methods
Blood Coagulation Disorders - complications - congenital
Blood Coagulation Disorders, Inherited - complications
Canada
Hemophilia A - complications
Hemorrhage - etiology
Hepatitis C - complications - transmission
Humans
Hypertension, Portal - diagnosis - virology
Liver Cirrhosis - diagnosis - virology
Liver Diseases - diagnosis - pathology - virology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
von Willebrand Diseases - complications
Abstract
Prior to the introduction of virally inactivated clotting factor concentrates, the majority of individuals with congenital bleeding disorders became infected with the hepatitis C virus. Although liver biopsy is valuable in prognosis and guiding antiviral therapy, there is a reluctance to perform biopsies in this population because of the risk of hemorrhage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of transjugular liver biopsy, and the usefulness of evaluating liver histology in this patient population. Liver histopathology was assessed by the METAVIR index and compared with corrected sinusoidal pressures, platelet counts, and abdominal ultrasonography. Liver biopsy was performed at seven Canadian centers in 65 patients with hemophilia or von Willebrand's disease. Biopsies were done on an outpatient basis, followed by a 4-hr observation period in hospital. Normal hemostasis was maintained during the peribiopsy period, with follow-up doses of factor concentrate self administered by the patient at home. One patient (1.4%) had significant bleeding leading to readmission and red cell transfusion. Liver histology showed 14 patients (22%) had cirrhosis. Ten patients had elevated corrected sinusoidal pressures; 7 of these (70%) had cirrhosis on biopsy, and the other 3 (30%) likely had cirrhosis although histology showed stage 3 fibrosis. This series represents the largest reported experience of transjugular biopsy in individuals with congenital bleeding disorders. We conclude that this procedure can be safely performed on an outpatient basis. The diagnosis of cirrhosis and/or portal hypertension was made in a substantial proportion of individuals (26%), all of whom had asymptomatic liver disease.
PubMed ID
15682411 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian national retrospective chart review comparing the long term effect of cyclosporine vs. tacrolimus on clinical outcomes in patients with post-liver transplantation hepatitis C virus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116457
Source
Ann Hepatol. 2013 Mar-Apr;12(2):282-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eric M Yoshida
Leslie B Lilly
Paul J Marotta
Andrew L Mason
Marc Bilodeau
Marc Vaillancourt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. eric.yoshida@vch.ca
Source
Ann Hepatol. 2013 Mar-Apr;12(2):282-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - immunology - virology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cyclosporine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Female
Graft Rejection - immunology - virology
Hepacivirus - genetics
Hepatitis C - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality - virology
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Liver Cirrhosis - immunology - virology
Liver Neoplasms - immunology - virology
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects - immunology - mortality
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
RNA, Viral - blood
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tacrolimus - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Viral Load
Abstract
The transition from regular use of cyclosporine to the newer calcineurin-inhibitors, such as tacrolimus, has been suggested as a contributing factor to the "era effect" of worsening outcomes of post-transplant HCV recurrence. This retrospective medical chart review of 458 patients was undertaken to evaluate the role of immunosuppressant choice (cyclosporine vs. tacrolimus) in determining virologic response and clinical outcomes of post-liver transplant HCV infection recurrence. Our results showed that patients undergoing interferon-based treatment taking cyclosporine have significantly better odds (OR: 2.59, P = 0.043) of presenting a sustained viral response (66.7%) compared to tacrolimus (52.8%). This did not result in a significant effect on post-liver transplantation clinical events including HCV-related deaths, graft loss, fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma or graft rejection. Other variables, which showed a significant relationship with the achievement of sustained viral response included donor age (OR 0.96, P = 0.001) and HCV genotype 1 infection (OR 0.05, P
PubMed ID
23396740 View in PubMed
Less detail

94 records – page 1 of 10.