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Adverse events following the administration of hepatitis B vaccines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223953
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1992 Apr 17;18(7):49-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-1992
Author
A. Bentsi-Enchill
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1992 Apr 17;18(7):49-53
Date
Apr-17-1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Risk factors
PubMed ID
1291014 View in PubMed
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Parents' attitudes towards hepatitis B vaccination for their children. A survey comparing paper and web questionnaires, Sweden 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77664
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Dannetun Eva
Tegnell Anders
Giesecke Johan
Author Affiliation
Department of Communicable Disease Control, Landstinget i Ostergötland, Linköping, Sweden. eva.dannetun@lio.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:86
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Correspondence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Internet
Male
Parents - psychology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The World Health Organisation, WHO, recommends that most countries should vaccinate all children against hepatitis B. Sweden has chosen not to do so, but the issue is reassessed regularly. The objective of this survey was to assess knowledge and attitudes towards hepatitis B vaccine for children among parents living in Sweden, and to compare distribution of responses and response rate between parents answering a postal questionnaire and those responding via the Internet. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional survey, where the sampling frame consisted of all parents to a child born 2002 living in Sweden. Two independent samples of 1001 parents in each sample were drawn. All parents were contacted by postal mail. The parents in the first sample were invited to participate by answering a paper questionnaire. The parents in the second sample were given an individual user name along with a password, and asked to log on to the Internet to answer an identical electronic questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 1229 questionnaires were analysed. The overall response rate for paper questionnaires was 55%, and 15% for the web version. Knowledge of the disease hepatitis B was overall high (90%). A higher degree of knowledge was seen among parents with education beyond high school (p = 0.001). This group of parents also had a higher tendency to reply via the Internet (p = 0.001). The willingness to accept hepatitis B vaccine for their child was correlated to the acceptance of the present childhood vaccination programme (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The results reveal a high level of knowledge of the disease and a positive attitude to having their children vaccinated. This study also displays that the conventional postal method of surveying still delivers a higher response rate than a web-based survey.
PubMed ID
17511891 View in PubMed
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Uptake and behavioural and attitudinal determinants of immunization in an expanded routine infant hepatitis B vaccination program in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169739
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Bigham
V P Remple
K. Pielak
C. McIntyre
R. White
W. Wu
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. mark.bigham@bloodservices.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):90-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunization Programs - utilization
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Abstract
British Columbia (BC) implemented a universal infant hepatitis B (HB) immunization program in 2001. The study objective was to evaluate HB immunization coverage among the first six-month cohort of eligible infants in the province outside of the Vancouver-Richmond health region and to assess parent/guardian behavioural and attitudinal determinants of HB immunization.
A cross-sectional survey of HB immunization was conducted using a random sample of eligible infants born between 1 January-30 June 2001. HB immunization coverage data were obtained from the provincial Public Health Information System, and through a telephone survey of 487 of eligible infants' parents/guardians that was conducted between October 2002-January 2003. At this time, parents/guardians were also asked about behaviours and attitudes towards immunization, based on the Immunization Health Belief Model Scale.
HB immunization coverage with at least one dose of HB vaccine was 89% and uptake of 3 doses of HB vaccine was 78%. HB immunization was significantly associated (p
PubMed ID
16619992 View in PubMed
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