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Universal prenatal screening for hepatitis B, Alberta, 1985-1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231268
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Feb 11;15(6):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-1989
Author
J R Waters
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Feb 11;15(6):29-32
Date
Feb-11-1989
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening - economics
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis
Risk factors
Abstract
A cooperative effort to identify all newborn infants at risk of acquiring hepatitis B infection involving the Canadian Red Cross BTS, Health Units, hospitals, and private doctors has been in place in Alberta since 1985. Routine universal screening of all prenatal patients identifies just under 200 infected mothers per year and about 90% of their infants receive HBIG and HB vaccine in a timely manner and are protected against infection and becoming hepatitis B carriers. At least half of these infants would not be identified if a selective testing program was in place and the cost for this much less efficient policy would be at least 4 times higher. The cost per infant protected through the universal screening program is estimated to be less than $1275. Routine screening of prenatal patients for HBsAg in a public health-coordinated program is highly cost effective and efficient. It is recommended that all jurisdictions consider such a program as recommended by the ACIP unless the hepatitis B carrier state is known to be extremely rare.
PubMed ID
2924362 View in PubMed
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