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Assessment of a universal, school-based hepatitis B vaccination program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214079
Source
JAMA. 1995 Oct 18;274(15):1209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-1995
Author
S. Dobson
D. Scheifele
A. Bell
Author Affiliation
Vaccine Evaluation Center, British Columbia's Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
JAMA. 1995 Oct 18;274(15):1209-13
Date
Oct-18-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cohort Studies
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - biosynthesis
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Immunization Schedule
Program Evaluation
School Health Services
Vaccination - adverse effects
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
To assess a hepatitis B vaccination program offered to all grade 6 students in British Columbia in 1992.
Cohort study.
British Columbia, Canada.
All grade 6 students were offered vaccine. Subsets of 454 and 259 students participated in studies of minor adverse events and seroresponse, respectively.
The vaccine used was Engerix-B, 20 micrograms, given at intervals of 0, 1, and 6 months.
Province-wide acceptance and series completion rates and reports of severe adverse events. Minor adverse events and immunogenicity in subsamples.
A total of 127,922 vaccine doses were administered. Initial enrollment totaled 43,358 students or 95.4% of those eligible. The series was completed by 41,594 students (95.6%). Minor adverse events were infrequent in the cohort assessed: no absenteeism or physician visits resulted from vaccination. Sixty-nine reported severe adverse events met surveillance definitions, the major categories being injection site reactions (23% of reports), fainting (20%), and rashes (17%). There was one instance of anaphylaxis. Only 13 of these events resulted in recommendations to discontinue the series. Of students tested following the series, 98% had levels of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen considered to be protective (> or = 10 IU/L), the geometric mean titer being 690 IU/L (95% confidence interval, 498 to 957 IU/L).
Our experience indicates that school-based programs for universal vaccination of preadolescents can be highly acceptable and efficient.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1995 Oct 18;274(15):1242-37563516
PubMed ID
7563510 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with hepatitis B vaccination among men having sexual relations with men in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Omega Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201394
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1999 Jul;26(6):317-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A. Dufour
R S Remis
M. Alary
J. Otis
B. Mâsse
B. Turmel
J. Vincelette
R. Lavoie
R. LeClerc
R. Parent
Author Affiliation
Groupe de recherche en épidémiologie, Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec, PQ, Canada.
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1999 Jul;26(6):317-24
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
HIV Seronegativity
Hepatitis B - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Vaccination
Abstract
To determine factors associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination status among HIV-uninfected men who have affective and sexual relations with men (MASM) in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
The Omega Cohort is a study of the incidence and psychosocial determinants of HIV infection among MASM in Montreal. Participants complete a questionnaire and are HIV-tested every 6 months. At baseline, we also performed testing for HBV markers and collected data on HBV vaccination history.
Forty-six percent of 653 participants had received at least one dose of HBV vaccination, whereas 28% were completely vaccinated. Lack of vaccination was associated with injection drug use, having > or =20 regular lifetime partners, living outside Montreal, not having sex in bathhouses, and not having consulted a physician aware of the participant's sexual orientation. Among vaccinated MASM, incomplete vaccination was associated with having
PubMed ID
10417018 View in PubMed
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Increases in levels of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in an immunized population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5564
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Apr;26(4):933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
L R Bulkow
R B Wainwright
B J McMahon
A J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Apr;26(4):933-7
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - immunology
Humans
Immunization
Male
Population
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Hepatitis B vaccine is effective in preventing infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), but its duration of protection is unknown. To examine the effect of exposure to HBV on an immunized population, data were analyzed from a cohort of Alaska Natives who were immunized and then followed up annually for 10 years. A boost in antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) was defined as a fourfold rise in levels to > or = 20 mIU/mL that was not accompanied by the presence of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen or attributable to interim vaccination. During 10 years of follow-up, 8.2% of 1,595 vaccines had boosts in anti-HBs. Persons with boosts did not differ significantly from those without boosts in terms of age, gender, village, initial level of anti-HBs, or level of anti-HBs before the boost. These results underscore the continued exposure to HBV among vaccinees and the continued protection against disease that the vaccine provides.
PubMed ID
9564478 View in PubMed
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