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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Analysis of a pregnancy-screening and neonatal-immunization program for hepatitis B in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 1977-1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225729
Source
J Med Virol. 1991 Sep;35(1):50-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
M A Chernesky
M A Blajchman
S. Castriciano
J. Basbaum
C. Spiak
J B Mahony
Author Affiliation
McMaster University Regional Virology and Chlamydiology Laboratory, St. Joseph's Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Med Virol. 1991 Sep;35(1):50-4
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - blood
Humans
Immunization, Passive
Immunoglobulins - administration & dosage
Infant
Mass Screening
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - prevention & control
Viral Hepatitis Vaccines - administration & dosage
Abstract
During the 12 years from January, 1977, to December, 1988, the Hamilton Centre of the Canadian Red Cross Society (CRCS) Blood Transfusion Service screened 98,712 pregnant patients for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and identified 120 positives (0.12%). The number of positives ranged from six to 16 per year. We were able to trace and enroll 65 mothers (54%) and 96 of their children in the follow-up study. The majority of the women were between 20 and 30 years of age (95.4%) and married (86%), and about one-half were employed outside the home. Sixty-five percent were white and 34% Asian, and 20 countries were listed as their places of origin. Hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) was available for neonatal immunization since 1977 and combined with vaccine since 1982. Of the 96 candidates for HBIG, 60 (63%) received HBIG within 24 hr, one after 3 months, four unknown, and 31 did not receive it. Of the 56 candidates for vaccination from 1982 to 1989, 26 (46%) received three doses, seven had two doses, eight had one dose, one was unknown, and 14 had none. HBsAg tests were performed on 69 children (71.8%) and anti-HBs on 61 (63.5%). Four of the children are HBsAg positive, 31 have anti-HBs, and 31 have no detectable antibodies. All four HBsAg positives had not received vaccine, and only one had received HBIG. Of the children positive for hepatitis B surface antibodies, five had received no immunization and therefore had been subclinically infected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1940883 View in PubMed
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Assessment of a universal, school-based hepatitis B vaccination program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214079
Source
JAMA. 1995 Oct 18;274(15):1209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-1995
Author
S. Dobson
D. Scheifele
A. Bell
Author Affiliation
Vaccine Evaluation Center, British Columbia's Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
JAMA. 1995 Oct 18;274(15):1209-13
Date
Oct-18-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cohort Studies
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - biosynthesis
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Immunization Schedule
Program Evaluation
School Health Services
Vaccination - adverse effects
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
To assess a hepatitis B vaccination program offered to all grade 6 students in British Columbia in 1992.
Cohort study.
British Columbia, Canada.
All grade 6 students were offered vaccine. Subsets of 454 and 259 students participated in studies of minor adverse events and seroresponse, respectively.
The vaccine used was Engerix-B, 20 micrograms, given at intervals of 0, 1, and 6 months.
Province-wide acceptance and series completion rates and reports of severe adverse events. Minor adverse events and immunogenicity in subsamples.
A total of 127,922 vaccine doses were administered. Initial enrollment totaled 43,358 students or 95.4% of those eligible. The series was completed by 41,594 students (95.6%). Minor adverse events were infrequent in the cohort assessed: no absenteeism or physician visits resulted from vaccination. Sixty-nine reported severe adverse events met surveillance definitions, the major categories being injection site reactions (23% of reports), fainting (20%), and rashes (17%). There was one instance of anaphylaxis. Only 13 of these events resulted in recommendations to discontinue the series. Of students tested following the series, 98% had levels of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen considered to be protective (> or = 10 IU/L), the geometric mean titer being 690 IU/L (95% confidence interval, 498 to 957 IU/L).
Our experience indicates that school-based programs for universal vaccination of preadolescents can be highly acceptable and efficient.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1995 Oct 18;274(15):1242-37563516
PubMed ID
7563510 View in PubMed
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Cost without benefit? The introduction of hepatitis B vaccine in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241902
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 May 15;128(10):1158-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1983
Author
R A Coates
J G Rankin
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 May 15;128(10):1158-60
Date
May-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B virus - immunology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Viral Vaccines - supply & distribution - therapeutic use
Notes
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PubMed ID
6404544 View in PubMed
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Do selective immunisation against tuberculosis and hepatitis B reach the targeted populations? A nationwide register-based study evaluating the recommendations in the Norwegian Childhood Immunisation Programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276953
Source
Vaccine. 2016 Apr 12;34(17):2015-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2016
Author
Berit Feiring
Ida Laake
Tor Molden
Siri E Håberg
Hanne Nøkleby
Siri Schøyen Seterelv
Per Magnus
Lill Trogstad
Source
Vaccine. 2016 Apr 12;34(17):2015-20
Date
Apr-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa South of the Sahara - ethnology
Asia - ethnology
BCG Vaccine - therapeutic use
Child
Health services needs and demand
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Vaccines - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunization Programs
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Tuberculosis - prevention & control
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Selective immunisation is an alternative to universal vaccination if children at increased risk of disease can be identified. Within the Norwegian Childhood Immunisation Programme, BCG vaccine against tuberculosis and vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) are offered only to children with parents from countries with high burden of the respective disease. We wanted to study whether this selective immunisation policy reaches the targeted groups.
The study population was identified through the Norwegian Central Population Registry and consisted of all children born in Norway 2007-2010 and residing in Norway until their second birthday, in total 240,484 children. Information on vaccinations from the Norwegian Immunisation Registry, and on parental country of birth from Statistics Norway, was linked to the population registry by personal identifiers. The coverage of BCG and HBV vaccine was compared with the coverage of vaccines in the universal programme.
Among the study population, 16.1% and 15.9% belonged to the target groups for BCG and HBV vaccine, respectively. Among children in the BCG target group the BCG vaccine coverage was lower than the coverage of pertussis and measles vaccine (83.6% vs. 98.6% and 92.3%, respectively). Likewise, the HBV vaccine coverage was lower than the coverage of pertussis and measles vaccine in the HBV target group (90.0% vs. 98.6% and 92.3%, respectively). The coverage of the targeted vaccines was highest among children with parents from South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The coverage of vaccines in the universal programme was similar in targeted and non-targeted groups.
Children targeted by selective vaccination had lower coverage of the target vaccines than of vaccines in the universal programme, indicating that selective vaccination is challenging. Improved routines for identifying eligible children and delivering the target vaccines are needed. Universal vaccination of all children with these vaccines could be considered.
PubMed ID
26947498 View in PubMed
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Duration of hepatitis B immunity in low risk children receiving hepatitis B vaccinations from birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5641
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2004 Jul;23(7):650-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Kenneth M Petersen
Lisa R Bulkow
Brian J McMahon
Carolyn Zanis
Marilyn Getty
Helen Peters
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2004 Jul;23(7):650-5
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - immunology
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The duration of protection after hepatitis B vaccination of infants is unknown. METHODS: We determined antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) at 4-13 years of age in 363 low risk children who had been vaccinated starting at birth with hepatitis B vaccine. Those with nonprotective titers ( or = 10 mIU/mL) of anti-HBs at 9 and 13 years, respectively. Of those who did not have protective antibody titers, 61% (33 of 54) and 67% (8 of 12), respectively, responded to a booster dose. In children of HBsAg-positive mothers, 31% retained protective anti-HBs at 12 years, and 90% (9 of 10) with nonprotective titers responded to a booster. In low risk children initially receiving a recombinant vaccine, 12.5% (26 of 208) and none (0 of 36) retained protective anti-HBs titers at 5 and 7 years of age, respectively. Of those who did not have protective titers, 90% (120 of 134) and 91% (32 of 35), respectively, responded to a booster. CONCLUSIONS: Anti-HBs disappeared by 5 years of age in most children who were vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine from birth. Although most children showed immunologic memory, one-third failed to demonstrate an anamnestic response to a booster dose. Additional long term studies of low risk infants are needed to determine duration of protection and the necessity for or timing of booster doses.
PubMed ID
15247604 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness and cost comparison of two strategies for hepatitis B vaccination of schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186677
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maryse Guay
Anne-Marie Clouâtre
Manon Blackburn
Geneviève Baron
Philippe De Wals
Chantale Roy
Jean Desrochers
François Milord
Author Affiliation
Direction de la santé publique, de la planification et de l'évaluation, Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux de la Montérégie, Longueuil, QC. m.guay@rrss16@gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):64-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Community Health Centers - economics - standards
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - economics
Humans
Immunization Programs - economics - organization & administration - utilization
Male
Program Evaluation
Quebec
School Health Services - economics - standards
Abstract
In 1994, immunization against hepatitis B was implemented in schools in Quebec, targeting grade 4 students. In 1996-1997 and 1997-1998, one Local Community Service Centre (CLSC) replaced the school-based program in its district with vaccination offered in community clinics after school hours. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness and costs of school-based and clinic-based programs.
Vaccination coverage data were collected in the CLSC with the clinic-based program (CBP), and in three matched CLSCs with a school-based program (SBP), from 1994 to 2000. Surveys were conducted to estimate costs to parents, to schools and to CLSCs in 1997-1998.
With the implementation of the CBP, the vaccination coverage fell to 73%, compared with over 90% in the SBPs. Coverage increased to 90% when the CBP was abandoned. Costs to the CLSC were not much lower in the CBP. Societal costs were $63 per student vaccinated in the CBP, and
PubMed ID
12583682 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the effectiveness of immunization delivery methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217823
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S14-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
T W Gyorkos
T N Tannenbaum
M. Abrahamowicz
L. Bédard
J. Carsley
E D Franco
G. Delage
M A Miller
D L Lamping
S A Grover
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S14-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization Programs - standards
Infant
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Measles - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Mumps - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Rubella - prevention & control
Abstract
Scientific evidence documenting the effectiveness of immunization delivery methods was summarized using the generic approach developed by the Community Health Practice Guidelines Working Group. The delivery methods examined were those for the adult and childhood vaccines of influenza, pneumococcal infection, hepatitis B, measles-mumps-rubella and diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus-polio. Based on a critical appraisal of 54 eligible comparative studies, the effects of different interventions were obtained and pooled effects were calculated for delivery methods oriented to the client, the provider and the system. The results indicate those interventions found to be most effective for each vaccine. This review of the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of immunization delivery methods provides a base for policy development and assists in the planning of resource allocation.
PubMed ID
7987755 View in PubMed
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Immunogenicity of two paediatric doses of monovalent hepatitis B or combined hepatitis A and B vaccine in 8-10-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174257
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Jul 1;23(31):4082-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2005
Author
Bernard Duval
Vladimir Gîlca
Nicole Boulianne
Genevieve Deceuninck
Louis Rochette
Gaston De Serres
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, Canada. bernard.duval@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Jul 1;23(31):4082-7
Date
Jul-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Female
Hepatitis A Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis A Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Male
Vaccines, Combined - administration & dosage - immunology
Vaccines, Subunit - administration & dosage - immunology
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage - immunology
Abstract
Hepatitis A and B vaccines are highly immunogenic in three-dose schedules. To obtain an equivalent result in children with two paediatric doses would be of significant benefit. The purpose of this study was to measure the immunogenicity of a two-dose schedule in children with two licensed recombinant HBsAg containing vaccines given at paediatric doses, one of them combined with hepatitis A. Seven-hundred and four healthy school children aged 8-10 years were recruited in an open label study to receive either Twinrix Pediatric (360 El.U HAV antigen; 10 microg HBsAg) or Recombivax (2.5 microg HBsAg) vaccine intramuscularly 6 months apart. The seroconversion (>/=1 mIU/ml for anti-HBs antibodies and >/=33 mIU/ml for anti-HAV antibodies), seroprotection (anti-HBs >/=10 mIU/ml) rates and the geometric mean titers (GMTs) were determined 4-8 weeks after the second dose. The anti-HBs seroconversion rate was 97.1% with Twinrix and 97.2% with Recombivax. The seroprotection rates were 96.5 and 94.4%, respectively (P = 0.17). The GMT was higher with Twinrix than with Recombivax (3248 mIU/ml versus 742 mIU/ml, P
PubMed ID
15963363 View in PubMed
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Impact of the media on vaccine uptake in British Columbia's grade 6 hepatitis B immunization program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201972
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1999 May 15;25(10):89-93; discussion 93-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1999
Author
M. Bigham
D. Schiefele
S. Dobson
Author Affiliation
BC Centre for Disease Control Society, Vancouver.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1999 May 15;25(10):89-93; discussion 93-4
Date
May-15-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Communications Media
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunization Programs - statistics & numerical data
Male
PubMed ID
10349746 View in PubMed
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Increases in levels of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in an immunized population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5564
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Apr;26(4):933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
L R Bulkow
R B Wainwright
B J McMahon
A J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Apr;26(4):933-7
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - immunology
Humans
Immunization
Male
Population
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Hepatitis B vaccine is effective in preventing infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), but its duration of protection is unknown. To examine the effect of exposure to HBV on an immunized population, data were analyzed from a cohort of Alaska Natives who were immunized and then followed up annually for 10 years. A boost in antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) was defined as a fourfold rise in levels to > or = 20 mIU/mL that was not accompanied by the presence of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen or attributable to interim vaccination. During 10 years of follow-up, 8.2% of 1,595 vaccines had boosts in anti-HBs. Persons with boosts did not differ significantly from those without boosts in terms of age, gender, village, initial level of anti-HBs, or level of anti-HBs before the boost. These results underscore the continued exposure to HBV among vaccinees and the continued protection against disease that the vaccine provides.
PubMed ID
9564478 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.