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A 25-year follow-up study of drug addicts hospitalised for acute hepatitis: present and past morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7324
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanne Rogne Gjeruldsen
Bjørn Myrvang
Stein Opjordsmoen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. s.m.r.gieruldsen@iwoks.uio.no
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Rehabilitation, Vocational - statistics & numerical data
Skin Diseases, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Environment
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate present and past morbidity in drug addicts, 25 years after hospitalisation for acute hepatitis B or hepatitis nonA-nonB. The hospital records for 214 consecutively admitted patients were analysed, and a follow-up study on 66 of the 144 patients still alive was performed. At follow-up, 1 of 54 (1.8%) hepatitis B patients was still HBsAg positive. Twelve patients originally diagnosed as hepatitis nonA-nonB were all among 54 found to be anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) positive, and the total anti-HCV prevalence was 81.8%. Twelve (22.2%) of the HCV cases were unknown before the follow-up examination. Four (6.1%) participants were anti-human immunodeficiency virus positive, only 1 was on antiretroviral therapy, and none had developed AIDS. Other chronic somatic diseases were a minor problem, whereas drug users reported skin infections as a frequent complication. Forty-three patients (65%) had abandoned addictive drugs since the hospital stay. Serious mental disorders were reported by 19 patients (28.8%), and 17 (25.8%) regarded themselves as present (9) and former (8) compulsive alcohol drinkers. A large proportion of the participants were granted disability pension (39%), a majority because of psychiatric disorders, drug and alcohol abuse.
PubMed ID
12644734 View in PubMed
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Co-morbidity of infectious and addictive diseases in St. Petersburg and the Leningrad Region, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171528
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2006;12(1):12-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
E M Krupitsky
E E Zvartau
D A Lioznov
M V Tsoy
V Y Egorova
T V Belyaeva
T V Antonova
N A Brazhenko
Z M Zagdyn
E V Verbitskaya
Y. Zorina
G F Karandashova
T Y Slavina
A Y Grinenko
J H Samet
G E Woody
Author Affiliation
Scientific Research Center of Addiction and Psychopharmacology, St. Petersburg State Pavlov Medical University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2006;12(1):12-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Comorbidity
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Heroin Dependence - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Russia
Statistics as Topic
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Russian health care system is organized around specific diseases, with relatively little focus on integration across specialties to address co-morbidities. This organizational structure presents new challenges in the context of the recent epidemics of injection drug use (IDU) and HIV. This paper uses existing and new data to examine the prevalence of reported new cases of drug dependence (heroin) and HIV over time as well as associations between drug dependence and alcoholism, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis in the City of St. Petersburg and the Leningrad region. We found a sharp rise in reported cases of IDU beginning in 1991 and continuing until 2002/2003, followed by a sharp rise in newly reported cases of HIV. These rises were followed by a drop in new cases of HIV and drug addiction in 2002/2003 and a drop in the proportion of HIV-positive individuals with IDU as a risk factor. Infection with hepatitis B and C were common, especially among injection drug users (38 and 85%, respectively), but also in alcoholics (7 and 14%). Tuberculosis was more common in alcoholics (53%) than in persons with alcoholism and drug dependence (10%), or with drug dependence alone (4%). Though these data have many limitations, they clearly demonstrate that drug dependence and/or alcoholism, HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis frequently co-occur in St. Petersburg and the Leningrad Region. Prevention and treatment services across medical specialties should be integrated to address the wide range of issues that are associated with these co-morbidities.
PubMed ID
16352898 View in PubMed
Less detail