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306 records – page 1 of 31.

A 10-year follow-up study of fixed metal ceramic prosthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75777
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
R. Näpänkangas
M A Salonen
A M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cementation
Ceramics
Crowns
Dental Abutments
Dental Porcelain
Dental Prosthesis Design
Denture Design
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Esthetics, Dental
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingival Pocket - etiology
Humans
Male
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Post and Core Technique
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Students, Dental
Surface Properties
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to record patients' satisfaction with fixed metal ceramic bridges and crowns made by dental students and to evaluate the functioning and condition of the bridges and crowns clinically and radiologically. Out of the 60 patients treated at the Institute of Dentistry during 1984-85, 30 patients attended the follow-up examination (16 women, mean age 39, range 23-62 years and 14 men, mean age 44, range 26-65 years). The anamnestic data and data regarding treatment procedures were collected from the patient files. The patients had been supplied with 41 crowns and 24 bridges (mean 3.9 units, range 3-6 units), which included 61 abutments and 33 pontics or cantilever extensions (abutment/pontic ratio 1.85: 1). Marginal fidelity was unsatisfactory in 13% of the crowns and bridges and gingival bleeding and pockets of 4-6 mm were noted in 27% and 12% of cases, respectively. None of the subjects had caries in the abutments.
PubMed ID
9372460 View in PubMed
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A 45-year experience with surgical treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211771
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1996 Jun;31(6):750-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
K. Azarow
P. Kim
B. Shandling
S. Ein
Author Affiliation
Division of General Surgery, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1996 Jun;31(6):750-3
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Gastric Outlet Obstruction - etiology - surgery
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - surgery
Histamine H2 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Humans
Intestinal Perforation - etiology - surgery
Ontario
Peptic Ulcer - complications - drug therapy - surgery
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) requiring surgical treatment has become rare with the availability of modern medical management. A retrospective study of all patients who required operations for PUD between 1949 and 1994 (n = 43) was done. The patients were classified into 3 groups: A (n = 38): pre-histamine-2 (H2) blocker era (1949-1975); B (n = 3): pre-hydrogen-potassium (H-K+) ATPase inhibitor era (1976-1988); C (n = 2): H-K+ ATPase inhibitor era (1989-1994). Data, analyzed using X2 analysis (P .01). Children with PUD can have complications similar to those of adults with PUD. Since the introduction of H2 antagonists, the recognition and treatment of H pylori, and the use of H-K+ ATPase inhibition, the incidence of operations for bleeding and perforation has decreased dramatically. However, the incidence of surgery for obstruction remains the same.
PubMed ID
8783092 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic and iliac artery compression following penetrating trauma: a study of feasibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256470
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Jun;29(3):299-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Matthew Douma
Peter George Brindley
Author Affiliation
1Collaborative Program in Resuscitation Science, Faculty of Medicine,University of Toronto,Toronto,Ontario,Canada.
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Jun;29(3):299-302
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - etiology - therapy
Alberta
Aorta, Abdominal - injuries
Body Weight
Clinical Competence
Emergency Treatment - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hemorrhage - etiology - prevention & control
Hemostatic Techniques
Humans
Iliac Artery - injuries
Male
Pressure
Sodium Chloride
Time Factors
Wounds, Penetrating - complications
Abstract
Penetrating junctional trauma is a leading cause of preventable death on the battlefield. Similarly challenging in civilian settings, exsanguination from the vessels of the abdomen, pelvis, and groin can occur in moments. Therefore, iliac artery or abdominal aortic compression has been recommended. Based on prior research, 120 lbs (54 kg) or 140 lbs (63 kg) of compression may be required to occlude these vessels, respectively. Whether most rescuers can generate this amount of compression is unknown.
To determine how many people in a convenience sample of 44 health care professionals can compress 120 lbs and 140 lbs.
This study simulated aortic and iliac artery compression. Consent was obtained from 44 clinicians (27 female; 17 male) from two large urban hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Participants compressed the abdominal model, which consisted of a medical scale and a 250 ml bag of saline, covered by a folded hospital blanket and placed on the ground. In random order, participants compressed a force they believed maintainable for 20 minutes ("maintainable effort") and then a maximum force they could maintain for two minutes ("maximum effort"). Compression was also performed with a knee. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the data.
Compression was directly proportional to the clinician's body weight. Participants compressed a mean of 55% of their body weight with two hands at a maintainable effort, and 69% at a maximum effort. At maintainable manual effort, participants compressed a mean of 86 lbs (39 kg). Sixteen percent could compress over 120 lbs, but none over 140 lbs. At maximum effort, participants compressed a mean of 108 lbs (48 kg). Thirty-four percent could compress greater than 120 lbs and 11% could compress greater than 140 lbs. Using a single knee, participants compressed a mean weight of 80% of their body weight with no difference between maintainable and maximum effort.
This work suggests that bimanual compression following penetrating junctional trauma is feasible. However, it is difficult, and is not likely achievable or sustainable by a majority of rescuers. Manual compression (used to temporize until device application and operative rescue) requires a large body mass. To maintain 140 lbs of compression (for example during a lengthy transport), participants needed to weigh 255 lbs (115 kg). Alternatively, they needed to weigh 203 lbs (92 kg) to be successful during brief periods. Knee compression may be preferable, especially for lower-weight rescuers.
PubMed ID
24913094 View in PubMed
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Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303030
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Knut Holtedahl
Peter Hjertholm
Lars Borgquist
Gé A Donker
Frank Buntinx
David Weller
Tonje Braaten
Jörgen Månsson
Eva Lena Strandberg
Christine Campbell
Joke C Korevaar
Ranjan Parajuli
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Abdominal Pain - etiology - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - pathology
Hematuria - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Scotland - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear.
To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region.
Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands.
Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms pre-specified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs.
Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of >3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer.
A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.
PubMed ID
29632003 View in PubMed
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Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303215
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Knut Holtedahl
Peter Hjertholm
Lars Borgquist
Gé A Donker
Frank Buntinx
David Weller
Tonje Braaten
Jörgen Månsson
Eva Lena Strandberg
Christine Campbell
Joke C Korevaar
Ranjan Parajuli
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Abdominal Pain - etiology - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - pathology
Hematuria - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Scotland - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear.
To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region.
Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands.
Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms pre-specified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs.
Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of >3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer.
A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.
PubMed ID
29632003 View in PubMed
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Abnormal bleeding associated with preeclampsia: a population study of 315,085 pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90728
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Eskild Anne
Vatten Lars J
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Akershus University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Uterine Hemorrhage - complications
Abstract
ObjeCTIVE: To study the association of preeclampsia with abnormal bleeding in the first trimester and after delivery. DESIGN: Register-based population study. Setting. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Population. A total of 315,085 women in Norway with singleton deliveries after 21 weeks of gestation (1999-2004). METHODS: We compared frequencies of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester between women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and women without preeclampsia development, and made similar comparisons for postpartum bleeding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women with bleeding. RESULTS: In the first trimester, vaginal bleeding occurred in 1.6% (215/13,166) of subsequent preeclampsia cases, compared to 2.0% (6,112/301,919) of normotensives (p1,500 mL) occurred in 3.0% (399/13,166) of preeclampsia cases and in 1.4% (4,223/301,919) of normotensives (p500 mL) was also more common in preeclampsia cases (22.9% versus 13.9%, p
PubMed ID
19093234 View in PubMed
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[Acceptance of ambulatory laser conization under local anesthesia by Danish women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24267
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Dec 7;154(50):3590-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-7-1992
Author
C F Thomsen
P E Helkjaer
J. Skovdal
P S Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Gynaekologisk obstetrisk afdeling, Centralsygehuset i Naestved.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Dec 7;154(50):3590-3
Date
Dec-7-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Anesthesia, Local
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Laser Surgery - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - surgery
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - surgery
Uterine Hemorrhage - etiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the acceptability of CO2 laser excisional conization for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia under local anaesthesia in an outpatient setting. Seventy-seven patients, who underwent this procedure, were interviewed three months later concerning pain during treatment, pain and bleeding in the immediate postoperative period, and their general opinion about this procedure. The median duration of surgery was 11 minutes. The postoperative median observation time was 90 minutes. Seventy-one women experienced no discomfort during treatment. Thirty-one patients needed mild analgesics for an average of three days. Bleeding continued for a mean of 7.7 days after treatment and 73% experienced the bleeding as less, 8% as more as compared to menstrual bleeding. Ninety-two percent of the women would prefer this procedure if they had to undergo conization once again. In conclusion, we found a high acceptability in women treated with CO2 laser excisional conization under local anaesthesia in an outpatient setting.
PubMed ID
1471278 View in PubMed
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Acute management and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding: a western Canadian survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167625
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Aug;20(8):531-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Justin Cheung
Winnie Wong
Iman Zandieh
Yvette Leung
Samuel S Lee
Alnoor Ramji
Eric M Yoshida
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Aug;20(8):531-4
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Endoscopy
Esophageal and Gastric Varices - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Gastroenterology - statistics & numerical data
Gastrointestinal Agents - therapeutic use
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - therapy
Guideline Adherence - trends
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Octreotide - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Abstract
Acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Guidelines have been published in 1997; however, variability in the acute management and prevention of EVB rebleeding may occur.
Gastroenterologists in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan were sent a self-reporting questionnaire.
The response rate was 70.4% (86 of 122). Intravenous octreotide was recommended by 93% for EVB patients but the duration was variable. The preferred timing for endoscopy in suspected acute EVB was within 12 h in 75.6% of respondents and within 24 h in 24.6% of respondents. Most (52.3%) gastroenterologists do not routinely use antibiotic prophylaxis in acute EVB patients. The preferred duration of antibiotic therapy was less than three days (35.7%), three to seven days (44.6%), seven to 10 days (10.7%) and throughout hospitalization (8.9%). Methods of secondary prophylaxis included repeat endoscopic therapy (93%) and beta-blocker therapy (84.9%). Most gastroenterologists (80.2%) routinely attempted to titrate beta-blockers to a heart rate of 55 beats/min or a 25% reduction from baseline. The most common form of secondary prophylaxis was a combination of endoscopic and pharmacological therapy (70.9%).
Variability exists in some areas of EVB treatment, especially in areas for which evidence was lacking at the time of the last guideline publication. Gastroenterologists varied in the use of prophylactic antibiotics for acute EVB. More gastroenterologists used combination secondary prophylaxis in the form of band ligation eradication and beta-blocker therapy rather than either treatment alone. Future guidelines may be needed to address these practice differences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16955150 View in PubMed
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Acute necrotizing encephalopathy in caucasian children: two cases and review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174029
Source
J Child Neurol. 2005 Jun;20(6):527-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Adam Kirton
Kevin Busche
Catherine Ross
Elaine Wirrell
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Child Neurol. 2005 Jun;20(6):527-32
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - pathology
Canada
Chickenpox
European Continental Ancestry Group
Fatal Outcome
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A virus
Influenza, Human
Leukoencephalitis, Acute Hemorrhagic - etiology - pathology
Liver Diseases - etiology
Myocardium - pathology
Necrosis
Rotavirus Infections
Seizures - etiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Acute necrotizing encephalopathy is a fulminant neurologic disease seen predominantly in Japan and Taiwan. We present two cases diagnosed at a Canadian center within the same year in Caucasian children. Both were previously well, developed an acute viral illness with fever and vomiting, and progressed to brain death within 2 to 4 days. Neuroimaging and postmortem examination demonstrated the unique features of bilateral and severe necrosis of deep gray- and subcortical white-matter structures. The first case was associated with extensive, but transient, hepatic involvement, recent varicella and rotavirus infections, and detailed metabolic studies, including mitochondrial functional analysis, were normal. The second case tested positive for influenza A infection, whereas evidence of liver damage was lacking. Both children demonstrated early lymphopenia and myocardial necrosis, two features not previously associated with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. These cases are unique in their occurrence in non-Japanese children and are among the first published reports in Canada.
PubMed ID
15996405 View in PubMed
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306 records – page 1 of 31.