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Acrylamide exposure and incidence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93773
Source
Int J Cancer. 2008 May 1;122(9):2094-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2008
Author
Olesen Pelle Thonning
Olsen Anja
Frandsen Henrik
Frederiksen Kirsten
Overvad Kim
Tjønneland Anne
Author Affiliation
National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg, Denmark. petol@food.dtu.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2008 May 1;122(9):2094-100
Date
May-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - adverse effects
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Breast Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Epoxy Compounds - blood
Female
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed in several foods during high-temperature processing. So far, epidemiological studies have not shown any association between human cancer risk and dietary exposure to acrylamide. The purpose of this study was to conduct a nested case control study within a prospective cohort study on the association between breast cancer and exposure to acrylamide using biomarkers. N-terminal hemoglobin adduct levels of acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite, glycidamide in red blood cells were analyzed (by LC/MS/MS) as biomarkers of exposure on 374 breast cancer cases and 374 controls from a cohort of postmenopausal women. The adduct levels of acrylamide and glycidamide were similar in cases and controls, with smokers having much higher levels (approximately 3 times) than nonsmokers. No association was seen between acrylamide-hemoglobin levels and breast cancer risk neither unadjusted nor adjusted for the potential confounders HRT duration, parity, BMI, alcohol intake and education. After adjustment for smoking behavior, however, a positive association was seen between acrylamide-hemoglobin levels and estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with an estimated incidence rate ratio (95% CI) of 2.7 (1.1-6.6) per 10-fold increase in acrylamide-hemoglobin level. A weak association between glycidamide hemoglobin levels and incidence of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer was also found, this association, however, entirely disappeared when acrylamide and glycidamide hemoglobin levels were mutually adjusted.
PubMed ID
18183576 View in PubMed
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Acrylamide exposure measured by food frequency questionnaire and hemoglobin adduct levels and prostate cancer risk in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90434
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 May 15;124(10):2384-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2009
Author
Wilson Kathryn M
Bälter Katarina
Adami Hans-Olov
Grönberg Henrik
Vikström Anna C
Paulsson Birgit
Törnqvist Margareta
Mucci Lorelei A
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. kwilson@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 May 15;124(10):2384-90
Date
May-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - toxicity
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Diet Records
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during the cooking of many commonly consumed foods. Data are scant on whether dietary acrylamide represents an important cancer risk in humans. We studied the association between acrylamide and prostate cancer risk using 2 measures of acrylamide exposure: intake from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin. We also studied the correlation between these 2 exposure measures. We used data from the population-based case-control study Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS). Dietary data was available for 1,499 cases and 1,118 controls. Hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide were measured in blood samples from a subset of 170 cases and 161 controls. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of prostate cancer in high versus low quantiles of acrylamide exposure using logistic regression. The correlation between FFQ acrylamide intake and acrylamide adducts in non-smokers was 0.25 (95% confidence interval: 0.14-0.35), adjusted for age, region, energy intake, and laboratory batch. Among controls the correlation was 0.35 (95% CI: 0.21-0.48); among cases it was 0.15 (95% CI: 0.00-0.30). The OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus lowest quartile of acrylamide adducts was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.47-1.85, p-value for trend = 0.98). For FFQ acrylamide, the OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.75-1.27, p trend = 0.67). No significant associations were found between acrylamide exposure and risk of prostate cancer by stage, grade, or PSA level. Acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin and FFQ-measured acrylamide intake were moderately correlated. Neither measure of acrylamide exposure-hemoglobin adducts or FFQ-was associated with risk of prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
19142870 View in PubMed
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Alcohol influence on acrylamide to glycidamide metabolism assessed with hemoglobin-adducts and questionnaire data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98517
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Mar;48(3):820-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Anna C Vikström
Kathryn M Wilson
Birgit Paulsson
Ioannis Athanassiadis
Henrik Grönberg
Hans-Olov Adami
Jan Adolfsson
Lorelei A Mucci
Katarina Bälter
Margareta Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.vikstrom@mk.su.se
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Mar;48(3):820-4
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamides - metabolism
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Depressants - pharmacology
Epoxy Compounds - metabolism
Ethanol - pharmacology
Food Habits
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Our purpose was to investigate whether alcohol (ethanol) consumption could have an influence on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide in humans exposed to acrylamide through food. We studied a subsample from a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer in Sweden (CAPS). Questionnaire data for alcohol intake estimates was compared to the ratio of hemoglobin-adduct levels for acrylamide and glycidamide, used as a measure of individual differences in metabolism. Data from 161 non-smoking men were processed with regard to the influence of alcohol on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide. A negative, linear trend of glycidamide-adduct to acrylamide-adduct-level ratios with increasing alcohol intake was observed and the strongest association (p-value for trend=0.02) was obtained in the group of men with the lowest adduct levels (47 pmol/g globin) when alcohol intake was stratified by acrylamide-adduct levels. The observed trend is likely due to a competitive effect between ethanol and acrylamide as both are substrates for cytochrome P450 2E1. Our results, strongly indicating that ethanol influence metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide, partly explain earlier observations of only low to moderate associations between questionnaire data on dietary acrylamide intake and hemoglobin-adduct levels.
PubMed ID
20034532 View in PubMed
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Anaemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with prostate cancer and bone metastases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99360
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Carsten Nieder
Ellinor Haukland
Adam Pawinski
Astrid Dalhaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine - Division of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodø, Norway. cnied@hotmail.com
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:284
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - blood - etiology - mortality - therapy
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Bone Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - mortality - secondary
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Taxoids - therapeutic use
Thrombocytopenia - blood - etiology - mortality - therapy
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors and prognostic impact of anaemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with bone metastases (BM) from prostate cancer. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study including 51 consecutive patients treated at a community hospital. Twenty-nine patients (57%) received taxotere after diagnosis of BM. RESULTS: Haemoglobin (Hb)
PubMed ID
20540802 View in PubMed
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Anaemia: a rare but neglected problem among Finnish patients receiving chemotherapy for solid tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145853
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2011 Jan;19(1):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Pirkko-Liisa Kellokumpu-Lehtinen
Ulla Puistola
Outi Paija
Eeva Taimela
Outi Hirvonen
Sari Raassina
Henrik Riska
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, B.O.X. 607, FIN 33101, Tampere, Finland. Pirkko-Liisa.Kellokumpu-Lehtinen@uta.fi
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2011 Jan;19(1):149-53
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications
Quality of Life
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaemia is very frequently diagnosed among cancer patients. Use of erythropoietins has proved to be effective in reducing the need of transfusions and enhancing patients' quality of life, but may also have detrimental effects in treating nonanemic asymptomatic patients. We assessed the frequency of anaemia and the frequency with which it was diagnosed and treated in different types of solid tumours treated at outpatient chemotherapy policlinics.
During the study period, altogether 733 consecutive subjects received chemotherapy at the five Finnish University Hospitals. Their data were collected. The physician who was responsible for the chemotherapy treatment was unaware of the survey. The response to anaemia (treated or not, the modality of treatment) were established from patients records; 69% were females, mean age was 61 years (range, 24-92).
The median haemoglobin level was 12.7 g/dL (range, 8.9-15.5 g/dL). About one third of the patients (200/733, 27%) had a value less than 12 g/dL. In only 15% of these cases was there any documentation of response or a possible treatment option for anaemia. On the other hand, only 12% of all patients (N=91) had a haemoglobin value less than 11 g/dL. However, in most of them anaemia had not been considered; in only 25% of cases was an active treatment option selected.
According to our survey, anaemia was less common in our patients than in the European Cancer Anaemia Survey. Only a minority of chemotherapy patients receiving their treatments as outpatients would need active treatment for their anaemia.
PubMed ID
20101415 View in PubMed
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Analysis of hemoglobin adducts from acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide in paired mother/cord blood samples from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131736
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2011 Nov 21;24(11):1957-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2011
Author
Hans von Stedingk
Anna C Vikström
Per Rydberg
Marie Pedersen
Jeanette K S Nielsen
Dan Segerbäck
Lisbeth E Knudsen
Margareta Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry Unit, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2011 Nov 21;24(11):1957-65
Date
Nov-21-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - blood
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, Liquid
Denmark
Epoxy Compounds - blood
Ethylene Oxide - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Fetus
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Maternal Exposure
Placenta - physiology
Pregnancy
Smoking - adverse effects - blood
Abstract
The knowledge about fetal exposure to acrylamide/glycidamide from the maternal exposure through food is limited. Acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide are electrophiles and form adducts with hemoglobin (Hb), which could be used for in vivo dose measurement. In this study, a method for analysis of Hb adducts by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the adduct FIRE procedure, was applied to measurements of adducts from these compounds in maternal blood samples (n = 87) and umbilical cord blood samples (n = 219). The adduct levels from the three compounds, acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide, were increased in tobacco smokers. Highly significant correlations were found between cord and maternal blood with regard to measured adduct levels of the three compounds. The mean cord/maternal hemoglobin adduct level ratios were 0.48 (range 0.27-0.86) for acrylamide, 0.38 (range 0.20-0.73) for glycidamide, and 0.43 (range 0.17-1.34) for ethylene oxide. In vitro studies with acrylamide and glycidamide showed a lower (0.38-0.48) rate of adduct formation with Hb in cord blood than with Hb in maternal blood, which is compatible with the structural differences in fetal and adult Hb. Together, these results indicate a similar life span of fetal and maternal erythrocytes. The results showed that the in vivo dose in fetal and maternal blood is about the same and that the placenta gives negligible protection of the fetus to exposure from the investigated compounds. A trend of higher levels of the measured adducts in cord blood with gestational age was observed, which may reflect the gestational age-related change of the cord blood Hb composition toward a higher content of adult Hb. The results suggest that the Hb adduct levels measured in cord blood reflect the exposure to the fetus during the third trimester. The evaluation of the new analytical method showed that it is suitable for monitoring of background exposures of the investigated electrophilic compounds in large population studies.
PubMed ID
21882862 View in PubMed
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Anemia and iron deficiency in inflammatory bowel disease: an open, prospective, observational study on diagnosis, treatment with ferric carboxymaltose and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108423
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Sep;48(9):1027-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Ragnar Befrits
Ola Wikman
Lars Blomquist
Henrik Hjortswang
Per Hammarlund
Antal Bajor
Daniel Klintman
Håkan Blom
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. ragnar.befrits@karolinska.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Sep;48(9):1027-32
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intravenous
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Colitis, Ulcerative - complications
Crohn Disease - complications
Erythrocyte Indices
Female
Ferric Compounds - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Ferritins - blood
Guideline Adherence
Hematinics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Male
Maltose - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Sweden
Transferrin - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Iron deficiency and anemia are being increasingly recognized as a complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to observe, in a non-interventional way, how Swedish gastroenterologists adhere to guidelines in IBD outpatients treated with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), and the result of treatment.
Altogether 394 IBD patients (Crohn's disease (CD) 60%, ulcerative colitis (UC) 40%) from 14 centers were included. Group A (n = 216) was observed from November 2008 and group B (n = 178) from March 2010. Time of observation ranged from 12 to 29 months.
S-Ferritin (?mol/l) and transferrin saturation (T-Sat; %) were recorded at baseline in 62% and 50% in group A. Median values for Hb, ferritin and T-Sat at baseline were 111 g/l, 10 ?mol/l and10%, respectively, and 134 g/l, 121 ?mol/l and 20% after iron treatment (p
PubMed ID
23889159 View in PubMed
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[Anemia in diabetic nephropathy: prevalence, clinical and pathophysiological aspects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155961
Source
Ter Arkh. 2008;80(6):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
M V Shestakova
S A Martynov
A V Il'in
A P Kniazeva
M Sh Shamkhalova
N P Trubitsyna
Source
Ter Arkh. 2008;80(6):41-7
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To investigate detectability of anemia, its clinical and pathophysiological features in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN).
The trial included 1020 patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). DN was diagnosed in 50% of them. Incidence of anemia was compared in 92 DN patients in type 1 DM and in 230 patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN). Concentration of erythropoietin (EP) in blood serum was measured in 94 DN patients in type 1 and 2 DM.
Anemia develops in type 1 and 2 DM patients free of DN and unaffected renal filtration function (glomerular filtration rate--GFR > 60 ml/min 1.73 m2) was 23.3 and 18.3%, respectively. In DN patients incidence rate of anemia depended on GFR and increased with growing severity of renal failure reaching 85.7% in GFR
PubMed ID
18655475 View in PubMed
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Anemia in early rheumatoid arthritis is associated with interleukin 6-mediated bone marrow suppression, but has no effect on disease course or mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86386
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Mar;35(3):380-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Nikolaisen Cathrin
Figenschau Yngve
Nossent Johannes C
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. cathrin.nikolaisen@unn.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Mar;35(3):380-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - complications - mortality
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - mortality
Blood Sedimentation
Bone Marrow - physiopathology
Female
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is the most common extraarticular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but there is limited information on the cause and consequences of ACD. We investigated the prevalence, relation with proinflammatory cytokines, and effect on disease outcome of ACD in patients with RA. METHODS: The presence of anemia was analyzed in a cohort of 111 consecutive patients with early RA. Anemia was related to markers of erythropoiesis and inflammation [clinically and by levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha]. The frequency of various disease outcomes during the mean followup of 74 months was compared between ACD and nonanemic patients. RESULTS: ACD was present in 25% during the first year of disease. ACD was associated with higher CRP (45 vs 22 g/l; p = 0.04) and ESR levels (54 vs 33 mm/h; p = 0.002). Hemoglobin levels were inversely correlated with serum erythropoietin (p = 0.003) in univariate analysis, but in multivariate analysis only ESR (p = 0.005) and IL-6 (p = 0.056) remained as independent predictors of hemoglobin levels. Presence of ACD was not associated with later development of disease manifestations or mortality. CONCLUSION: While ACD affected 25% of patients with RA early in the disease course, this had no influence on disease outcome including mortality during the following 6 years. The association between IL-6 and ACD suggests that IL-6-mediated bone marrow suppression is the main mechanism for development of ACD in RA.
PubMed ID
18260177 View in PubMed
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Arctic adaptation in reindeer. The energy saving of a hemoglobin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230968
Source
FEBS Lett. 1989 Apr 10;247(1):135-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1989
Author
B. Giardina
O. Brix
M. Nuutinen
S. el Sherbini
A. Bardgard
G. Lazzarino
S G Condò
Author Affiliation
Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, II University of Rome, Italy.
Source
FEBS Lett. 1989 Apr 10;247(1):135-8
Date
Apr-10-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
2,3-Diphosphoglycerate
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Chlorides - blood
Cold Temperature
Diphosphoglyceric Acids - blood
Energy Metabolism
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Oxygen - blood
Protein Conformation
Reindeer - physiology
Temperature
Thermodynamics
Abstract
Previous results [(1988) Arct. Med. Res. 47, 83-88] have shown that hemoglobin from reindeer is characterized by a low overall heat of oxygenation. This particular aspect has been investigated further in a series of precise oxygen equilibrium experiments. The results obtained show a peculiar dependence of the temperature effect on the fractional saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen, which could be regarded as a very interesting case of molecular adaptation to extreme environmental conditions.
PubMed ID
2707444 View in PubMed
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120 records – page 1 of 12.