Skip header and navigation

Refine By

281 records – page 1 of 29.

Abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers: blood doping or?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71327
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
James Stray-Gundersen
Tapio Videman
Ilkka Penttilä
Inggard Lereim
Author Affiliation
jimsg@singlepoint.net
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Doping in Sports - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices - drug effects
Erythropoiesis - drug effects - physiology
Female
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reticulocyte Count
Skiing - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is widespread public concern about fairness in sports. Blood doping undermines fairness and places athletes' health at risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers, which may indicate a high probability of blood doping. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Samples were obtained as part of routine International Ski Federation blood testing procedures from participants at the World Ski Championships. Sixty-eight percent of all skiers and 92% of those finishing in the top 10 places were tested. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Using flow cytometry, we analyzed erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices. Reference values were from the 1989 Nordic Ski World Championships data set and the International Olympic Committee Erythropoietin 2000 project. RESULTS: Of the skiers tested and finishing within the top 50 places in the competitions, 17% had "highly abnormal" hematologic profiles, 19% had "abnormal" values, and 64% were normal. Fifty percent of medal winners and 33% of those finishing from 4th to 10th place had highly abnormal hematologic profiles. In contrast, only 3% of skiers finishing from 41st to 50th place had highly abnormal values. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that blood doping is both prevalent and effective in cross-country ski racing, and current testing programs for blood doping are ineffective. It is unlikely that blood doping is less common in other endurance sports. Ramifications of doping affect not only elite athletes who may feel compelled to risk their health but also the general population, particularly young people.
PubMed ID
12792206 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accepted low hemoglobin levels in the perioperative period. A questionnaire survey among Norwegian anesthesiologists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34570
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 10;116(27):3219-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1996
Author
U E Kongsgaard
H. Aune
Author Affiliation
Anestesiavdelingen, Det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 10;116(27):3219-21
Date
Nov-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anesthesiology - manpower
Blood Transfusion, Autologous
Child
English Abstract
Female
Hemodilution
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Infant
Intraoperative Period
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Abstract
Declining haemoglobin concentrations are accepted in order to avoid allogeneic blood transfusions in surgical patients. A questionnaire was sent to all members of the Norwegian Association of Anaesthesiologists addressing the question of safe blood levels of haemoglobin in different patient groups, and the different blood conservation techniques used in their hospital. 206 questionnaires (49%) were returned. Intraoperative and postoperative autotransfusions were the two most frequently used methods of saving blood. The survey demonstrates a wide diversity in the accepted lower haemoglobin levels, especially in children, and in spite of its limitations sheds light on Norwegian anaesthetists' routines as regards the indications for blood transfusion and blood conservation in the perioperative period.
PubMed ID
9011973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aerobic exercise capacity at sea level and at altitude in Kenyan boys, junior and senior runners compared with Scandinavian runners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50148
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1995 Aug;5(4):209-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
B. Saltin
H. Larsen
N. Terrados
J. Bangsbo
T. Bak
C K Kim
J. Svedenhag
C J Rolf
Author Affiliation
August Krogh Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1995 Aug;5(4):209-21
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Altitude
Ammonia - blood
Body Weight
Comparative Study
Denmark
Efficiency
Energy Metabolism
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Heart rate
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Kenya
Lactates - blood
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Running - education - physiology
Sweden
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterize Kenyan runners in regard to their oxygen uptake and blood and ammonia responses when running. Untrained Kenyan boys (14.2 +/- 0.2 years) and Scandinavian runners were included for comparison. The studies were performed at altitude (approximately 2.000 m.a.s.l.) and, for several Kenyan and Scandinavian runners, at sea level as well. At altitude sedentary adolescent Kenyan boys had a mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) of 47 (44-51) ml.kg-1.min-1, whereas similarly aged boys regularly walking or running but not training for competition reached above 62 (58-71) ml.kg-1.min-1 in VO2max. Kenyan runners in active training had 68 +/- 1.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 at altitude and 79.9 +/- 1.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 at sea level, with individuals reaching 85 ml.kg-1.min-1. The best Scandinavian runners were not significantly different from the Kenyan runners in VO2max both at altitude and at sea level, but none of the Scandinavians reached as high individual values as observed for some Kenyan runners. The running efficiency, determined as the oxygen cost at a given running speed, was less in the Kenyan runners, and the difference became more pronounced when body weight was expressed in ml.kg-0.75 min-1. Blood lactate concentration was in general lower in the Kenyan than in the Scandinavian runners, and the Kenyans also had extremely low ammonia accumulation in the blood even at very high exercise intensities. It is concluded that it is the physical activity during childhood, combined with intense training as teenagers that brings about the high VO2max observed in some Kenyan runners. Their high aerobic capacity, as well as their good running economy, makes them such superior runners. In addition, their low blood lactate and ammonia accumulation in blood when running may also be contributing factors.
PubMed ID
7552766 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(11):1055-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
E. Juvonen
E. Ikkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(11):1055-60
Date
1997
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemoglobins - analysis - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Male
Polycythemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Primary prevention - methods
Risk assessment
Risk factors
PubMed ID
11466859 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaemia and iron deficiency screening in adolescence: a pilot study of iron stores and haemoglobin response to iron treatment in a population of 14-15-year-olds in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200729
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Aug;88(8):815-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
B. Eskeland
S. Hunskaar
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Aug;88(8):815-21
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Ferritins - blood
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Iron Compounds - therapeutic use
Male
Mass Screening
Norway - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
Screening for haemoglobin (Hb) and s-ferritin, in 176 of all 189 (93%) pupils at 8th grade (14-15-years-old) in one Norwegian community was performed in order to map the prevalence of anaemia and depleted iron stores. In order to determine the clinical significance of the findings, a questionnaire aimed at detecting symptoms or risk factors for iron deficiency was completed by all participants, and a 3 mo therapeutic trial with iron was offered to subjects with s-ferritin values below 15 microg/l. Four percent of girls and 8% of boys were anaemic according to WHO cut-off levels. S-ferritin
PubMed ID
10503678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaemia impedes functional mobility after hip fracture surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158227
Source
Age Ageing. 2008 Mar;37(2):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Nicolai B Foss
Morten Tange Kristensen
Henrik Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. nbf@comxnet.dk
Source
Age Ageing. 2008 Mar;37(2):173-8
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Blood Transfusion
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Hemoglobins - analysis
Hip Fractures - mortality - rehabilitation - surgery
Humans
Male
Perioperative Care - methods
Physical Therapy Modalities
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Walking - physiology
Abstract
the impact of anaemia on the outcome after a hip fracture surgery is controversial, but anaemia can potentially decrease the physical performance and thereby impede post-operative rehabilitation. We therefore conducted a prospective study to establish whether anaemia affected functional mobility in the early post-operative phase after a hip fracture surgery.
four hundred and eighty seven consecutive hip fracture patients, treated according to a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation programme with a uniform, liberal transfusion threshold, were studied. Hb was measured on each of the first three post-operative days, and anaemia defined as Hb
PubMed ID
18349013 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaemia in the first but not in the second or third trimester is a risk factor for low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185239
Source
Clin Nutr. 2003 Jun;22(3):271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Henna Hämäläinen
Katja Hakkarainen
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Clin Nutr. 2003 Jun;22(3):271-5
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, Second - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, Third - blood
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To assess pregnancy outcome in women with anaemia during pregnancy.
The study design involved a retrospective chart review of all women registering for prenatal care in the area of Kuopio University Hospital between 1990 and 2000. A haemoglobin concentration below 100g/l was used as a cutoff for anaemia and affected women (N=597) were stratified by the trimester at which anaemia was diagnosed. Multiple regression analysis was used to compare obstetric outcomes in the study groups and in non-anaemic women (N=22,202).
The frequency of anaemia was 2.6%, with 0.3% occurring in the first trimester. After controlling for confounding factors, anaemia detected in the first trimester was associated with low-birth-weight infants (OR=3.14, 95% CI: 1.35-7.28) whereas the mid- and third-trimester anaemia groups showed no significantly different outcomes when compared with the non-anaemic women. First trimester anaemia was not significantly associated with small birth weight for gestational age (OR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.41-2.17) or with premature delivery
PubMed ID
12765667 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anemia in 1-year old infants--still a problem?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36393
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 30;113(3):327-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1993
Author
K. Klem
Author Affiliation
Helsetjenesten i Oslo kretsfengsel, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 30;113(3):327-8
Date
Jan-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia - blood - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Infant
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The results of a retrospective study of routine measurement of haemoglobin at the examination of one-year-old children at Grøland mother and child clinic during 1989-91 showed that 37% of the children had anaemia. There was no difference between immigrants and the European population. There was no correlation between anaemia and sex in either of the population groups. This may imply that routine haemoglobin measurement should be generally introduced as part of the regular control of one-year-old children.
PubMed ID
8441979 View in PubMed
Less detail

281 records – page 1 of 29.