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The 16-year incidence, progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy in a young population-based Danish cohort with type 1 diabetes mellitus: The Danish cohort of pediatric diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259744
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2014;51(3):413-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rebecca Broe
Malin Lundberg Rasmussen
Ulrik Frydkjaer-Olsen
Birthe Susanne Olsen
Henrik Bindesboel Mortensen
Tunde Peto
Jakob Grauslund
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2014;51(3):413-20
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - metabolism
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Male
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the long-term incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and associated risk factors in young Danish patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In 1987-89, a pediatric cohort involving approximately 75 % of all children with Type 1 diabetes in Denmark
PubMed ID
24193810 View in PubMed
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A 52-week prospective, cohort study of the effects of losartan with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145472
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
N. Racine
P. Hamet
J S Sampalis
N. Longo
N. Bastien
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - chemically induced
Diuretics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Linear Models
Losartan - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of an ARB, with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), on glycaemic factors and the risk for developing diabetes in hypertensive patients with the metabolic syndrome have not been fully assessed. This was a 52-week multicentre, prospective, phase-IV, open-label, cohort study of losartan or losartan/HCTZ in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. All subjects were treated initially with losartan 50?mg?day(-1). Those not achieving target blood pressure (BP
PubMed ID
20147971 View in PubMed
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A1C variability predicts incident cardiovascular events, microalbuminuria, and overt diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149324
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Johan Wadén
Carol Forsblom
Lena M Thorn
Daniel Gordin
Markku Saraheimo
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. per-henrik.groop@helsinki.fi
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Autoanalysis - methods
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - metabolism
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
Recent data from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) indicated that A1C variability is associated with the risk of diabetes microvascular complications. However, these results might have been influenced by the interventional study design. Therefore, we investigated the longitudinal associations between A1C variability and diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes in the observational Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study.
A total of 2,107 patients in the FinnDiane Study had complete data on renal status and serial measurements of A1C from baseline to follow-up (median 5.7 years), and 1,845 patients had similar data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Intrapersonal SD of serially measured A1C was considered a measure of variability.
During follow-up, 10.2% progressed to a higher albuminuria level or to end-stage renal disease, whereas 8.6% had a CVD event. The SD of serial A1C was 1.01 versus 0.75 (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19651819 View in PubMed
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Action research led to a feasible lifestyle intervention in general practice for people with prediabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258001
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2014 Apr;8(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Helle Terkildsen Maindal
Ane Bonde
Jens Aagaard-Hansen
Author Affiliation
Section for Health Promotion and Health Services and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark. Electronic address: htm@alm.au.dk.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2014 Apr;8(1):23-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Feasibility Studies
Female
General practice
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Prediabetic State - blood - diagnosis - nursing - therapy
Referral and Consultation
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To develop and pilot a feasible lifestyle intervention for people with prediabetes tailored for general practice. The study was designed to explore (i) what resources and competencies would be required and (ii) which intervention components should be included.
In the first of two action research cycles various interventions were explored in general practice. The second cycle tested the intervention described by the end of the first cycle. In total, 64 patients, 8 GPs and 10 nurses participated.
An intervention comprising six consultations to be delivered during the first year after identified prediabetes was found feasible by the general practice staff in terms of resources. Practice nurses possessed the adequate competences to undertake the core part of the intervention. The intervention comprised fixed elements according to structure, time consumption and educational principles, and flexible elements according to educational material and focus points for behaviour change. Clinical relevant reductions in patients' BMI and HbA1c were found.
A prediabetes lifestyle intervention for Danish general practice with potential for diabetes prevention was developed based on action research. The transferability of the developed intervention to other general practices depends on the GPs priorities, availability of practice nurses to deliver the core part, and the remuneration system for general practice. The long-term feasibility in larger patient populations is unknown.
PubMed ID
24361372 View in PubMed
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Acute and chronic effects of biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch surgery on plasma visfatin and apelin levels in patients with severe obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114747
Source
Obes Surg. 2013 Nov;23(11):1806-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Sarah-Maude Caron-Cantin
Julie Martin
Marjorie Bastien
Mercedes Nancy Munkonda
Huiling Lu
Katherine Cianflone
Fady Moustarah
Laurent Biertho
Simon Marceau
Frédéric-Simon Hould
Jean Bussières
Paul Poirier
Author Affiliation
Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, 2725 Chemin Sainte-Foy, Quebec City, QC, Canada, G1V 4G5.
Source
Obes Surg. 2013 Nov;23(11):1806-14
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - surgery
Adult
Apolipoproteins B - metabolism
Biliopancreatic Diversion
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cholesterol, LDL - metabolism
Cytokines - blood
Duodenum - surgery
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Inflammation - epidemiology - metabolism
Insulin Resistance
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Male
Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase - blood
Obesity, Morbid - blood - epidemiology - surgery
Quebec - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Visfatin is an adipokine linked to obesity and inflammation, and it has insulin-mimetic properties. Apelin is an adipokine with positive cardiac inotropic effects, and it may be related to inflammatory molecules. Variations in plasma visfatin and apelin levels following bariatric surgery remain controversial.
In this study, patients who underwent a biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) were compared to a severely obese group (control group). Anthropometric measures and blood samples were taken before surgery, on days 1 and 5, as well as at 6 and 12 months after surgery in the BDP-DS group. For the control group, the tests were performed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months.
Seventy subjects in the BPD-DS group and 28 in the control group were included. The expected reduction in body weight at 1 year after a BPD-DS was observed (85.9?±?18.5 vs. 136.6?±?27.7 kg at baseline; p?
PubMed ID
23585024 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of glycemic control in hemodialysis patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167303
Source
Diabetes Care. 2006 Oct;29(10):2247-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Daniel J Tascona
A Ross Morton
Edwin B Toffelmire
David C Holland
Eduard A Iliescu
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2006 Oct;29(10):2247-51
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Renal Dialysis
Abstract
We sought to measure the prevalence of inadequate glycemic control in prevalent hemodialysis patients with diabetes and to examine independent predictors of inadequate glycemic control in these patients.
This is a cross-sectional study of prevalent hemodialysis patients with diabetes in southeastern Ontario (n = 100). Data were collected by chart review and interview. The outcome variable was inadequate glycemic control defined as HbA1c (A1C) >0.07. Other measured variables were diabetes type, diabetes duration, diabetes physician, blood glucose monitoring, diabetes medications, BMI, time on dialysis, and other demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables.
Fifty-four patients had A1C >0.07. In bivariate analysis, these patients had a longer diabetes duration (23.6 vs. 14.7 years, P 0.07.
A high proportion of hemodialysis patients with diabetes had inadequate glycemic control, particularly those with longstanding disease. Patients with inadequate glycemic control had a significantly higher burden of microvascular complications.
PubMed ID
17003301 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
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Adherence to self-care and glycaemic control among people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47709
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Jun;34(6):780-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
M. Toljamo
M. Hentinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Administration, Oulu University Hospital, Box 5000 University of Oulu, FIN-90 014, Finland. maisa.toljamo@oulu.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Jun;34(6):780-6
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - rehabilitation
Female
Finland
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology
Abstract
AIM OF THE STUDY: Factors associated with adherence to self-care and glycaemic control were studied in 213 people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus using a self-report questionnaire and a biochemical indicator (glycosylated haemoglobin). METHODS: The data were collected in the Oulu Health Center and the Central Hospital of Lapland in Northern Finland. The response rate was 76%. In order to verify the reliability and validity of the instruments, we used correlation coefficients, factor analysis and item-total analysis. Internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's alpha. The connections between self-care and the background variables were examined by cross-tabulation. FINDINGS: The majority of subjects accomplished their insulin treatment as scheduled, but had more difficulties with the other aspects of self-care. According to the findings, a fifth (19%) of the respondents were neglecting their self-care. The others undertook flexible (46%), regimen-adherent (16%) or self-planned self-care (19%). The subjects who were adherent to self-care had better metabolic control than those who neglected self-care. According to logistic regression analysis, poor metabolic control (P=0.003), smoking (P=0.009) and living alone (P=0.014) were associated with neglect of self-care. Gender, concurrent diseases and complications as a result of diabetes increased the risk, but had no significant association with adherence to or neglect of self-care. CONCLUSION: The findings demonstrated that adherence to self-care does not always lead to good metabolic control, but neglect of self-care is likely to lead to poor metabolic control.
PubMed ID
11422548 View in PubMed
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Adult stature and diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes: the FinnDiane Study and the diabetes control and complications trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150600
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Aug;58(8):1914-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Johan Wadén
Carol Forsblom
Lena M Thorn
Markku Saraheimo
Milla Rosengård-Bärlund
Outi Heikkilä
Kustaa Hietala
Ken Ong
Nicholas Wareham
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Aug;58(8):1914-20
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Body Height
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Short adult stature has previously been associated with cardiovascular disease, but its relationship with the microvascular complications of diabetes is uncertain. Therefore, we evaluated the association between adult stature and prevalence and incidence of diabetic microvascular complications.
This cross-sectional and longitudinal study comprises 3,968 adult patients with type 1 diabetes from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study and 1,246 adult patients from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). In FinnDiane, diabetic nephropathy was defined as urinary albumin excretion > or = 300 mg/24 h, dialysis, or renal transplantation. Retinopathy was divided into background and proliferative (laser-treated) retinopathy. In the DCCT, original nephropathy (class 1-6) and retinopathy (Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study) classifications were used.
In the FinnDiane study, patients in the lowest quartile of adult height had increased risks of prevalent diabetic nephropathy (odds ratio [OR] 1.71, 95% CI 1.44-2.02) and prevalent laser-treated retinopathy (1.66, 1.43-1.93) compared with other patients. Similarly, in the DCCT, patients in the lowest quartile of adult height had increased risks of incident diabetic nephropathy class 4-6 (hazard ratio 2.70, 95% CI 1.59-4.59) and incident proliferative retinopathy (2.06, 1.15-3.71). In the FinnDiane study, the associations were largely explained by childhood exposure to diabetes. However, in the DCCT, where a greater proportion of patients had diabetes onset >18 years, the association with nephropathy was independent of childhood diabetes exposure.
Short adult stature is associated with microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes. These findings are compatible with either childhood diabetes exposure or "common soil" or both as potential explanations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19491208 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): a randomized trial evaluating theory-based interventions to increase physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121291
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):45-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
R C Plotnikoff
N. Karunamuni
K S Courneya
R J Sigal
J A Johnson
S T Johnson
Author Affiliation
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):45-56
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alberta
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - therapy
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Physical activity (PA) is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, most T2DM adults are insufficiently active.
To explore the effectiveness of two innovative/theoretically based behavioral-change strategies to increase PA and reduce hemoglobin A1c (A1c) in T2DM adults.
Participants (n = 287) were randomly assigned to a control group or an intervention group (i.e., print-based materials/pedometer group or print-based materials/pedometer plus telephone-counseling group). Changes in PA and A1c and other clinical measures were examined by Linear Mixed Model analyses over 18 months, along with moderating effects for gender and age.
PA and A1c levels did not significantly change in intervention groups. Step counts significantly increased in the print-based materials and pedometer plus telephone counseling group, for women.
No significant effects were found for PA or A1c levels for T2DM adults. The multi-component strategy including telephone counseling may have potential for women. The trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234.
PubMed ID
22922954 View in PubMed
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249 records – page 1 of 25.