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645 records – page 1 of 65.

[1st Symposium on Nitrates in Stockholm. Conclusion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56131
Source
Med Welt. 1976 Jan 16;27(3):130-1 concl
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-16-1976

[1st Symposium on Nitrates in Stockholm. VI]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56139
Source
Med Welt. 1976 Jan 9;27(2):88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1976

ACE inhibitors captopril and enalapril induce regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54522
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A I Dyadyk
A E Bagriy
I A Lebed
N F Yarovaya
E V Schukina
G G Taradin
Author Affiliation
Department of Postgraduate Therapy Training, Medical University, Donetsk, Ukraine.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Captopril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Diastole - drug effects
Drug Tolerance
Enalapril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Systole - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is frequently noted in patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure not requiring dialysis. Recently, several studies have shown reversal of myocardial hypertrophy in end-stage renal disease with long-term pharmacological control of blood pressure, but it is unclear whether left ventricular mass regresses or normalizes with antihypertensive treatment of patients with earlier stages of chronic renal failure. METHODS: Seventy-two undialysed patients with chronic renal failure, chronic mild-to-moderate hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were randomly assigned in a prospective study to either the captopril (n = 36) or enalapril group (n = 36). Blood pressure measurements, echocardiographic and Doppler parameters were evaluated before treatment and at 6 and 12 months of therapy. RESULTS: During follow-up, six patients developed side-effects including dry cough, taste disturbances, skin rash and gastric intolerance. In the captopril group there was a decrease in mean left ventricular mass index by 12% after 6 months of treatment, which decreased by 20% after 12 months treatment. For enalapril, the average reduction of myocardial mass after 6 months treatment was 14% and after 12 months treatment, the decrease was 19%. In both treatment groups there was significant improvement of left ventricular filling dynamics. No deterioration of left ventricular systolic function was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that antihypertensive monotherapy with the ACE inhibitors, captopril and enalapril, in patients with chronic renal failure results in regression of left ventricular mass index associated with a significant improvement in the diastolic function of the left ventricle without a demonstrable deterioration in left ventricular systolic performance.
PubMed ID
9175047 View in PubMed
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Acetate-induced changes in cardiac energy metabolism and hemodynamics in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12462
Source
Basic Res Cardiol. 1988 Jul-Aug;83(4):431-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
K T Kiviluoma
M. Karhunen
T. Lapinlampi
K J Peuhkurinen
I E Hassinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Basic Res Cardiol. 1988 Jul-Aug;83(4):431-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetic Acid
Acetic Acids - pharmacology
Adenosine - metabolism
Animals
Cardiac Output - drug effects
Epinephrine - blood
Heart - drug effects - physiology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes
In Vitro
Myocardium - metabolism
Oxygen Consumption - drug effects
Phosphorylation
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Time Factors
Abstract
The hemodynamic and metabolic effects of acetate were studied in rats in vivo and in the isolated perfused heart. Hemodynamic parameters, myocardial phosphagens, inorganic phosphate, and adenosine were measured in vivo. Acetate uptake, coronary flow, O2 consumption, parameters of the cellular energy state, and hypoxanthine compounds and their washout were measured in heart perfusion experiments. Heart rate (HR), cardiac output, and the peak derivative of the left ventricular pressure rise (dP/dtmax) increased significantly during acetate infusion in vivo, but mean arterial pressure, systolic arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance decreased. Heart muscle ATP concentrations decreased after 7 min of acetate infusion. In vivo cardiac work load (HR.(peak left ventricular pressure] showed a positive correlation with tissue adenosine concentration and a negative correlation with phosphorylation potential. Acetate uptake in the perfused hearts was about 2.5 mumol/min per gram wet weight. Acetate perfusion increased O2 consumption and coronary flow concomitantly with a decrease in tissue ATP concentration. Tissue AMP and perfusate effluent adenosine concentration and adenosine output increased significantly, perfusate adenosine showing a non-linear positive correlation with coronary flow. The results demonstrate that acetate induces considerable changes in hemodynamics and metabolism in the heart.
PubMed ID
3190660 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the hemodynamic and antioxidant effects of Capoten and prazosin in patients with refractory heart failure]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54537
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
R O Sabadyshyn
B I Rudyk
N H Blinova
O Ia Slipak
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):72-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Antioxidants - therapeutic use
Captopril - therapeutic use
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation
English Abstract
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Prazosin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Overall fifty one patients with chronic cardiac insufficiency (ChCI) were studied for changes in parameters characterizing hemodynamics and lipid peroxidation (LPO) under treatment with kapoten and prazosin. Kapoten was found to be capable of exerting an antioxidant effect and working in ways beneficial for the pulmonary circulation, while prazosin is generally indicated to patients with ChCI presenting with increased end diastolic pressure in the left ventricle. Prazosin activates LPO, for which reason its pro-oxidant action needs to be drug-corrected. Because of marked pharmacologic effects of both drugs in dealing with refractory circulatory insufficiency it is advisable that further studies be made in order that we might be able to determine indications for kapoten and prazosin therapy in coronary patients as well as those with arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathies, valvular defects, ChCI with complications more accurately.
PubMed ID
9333490 View in PubMed
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[A comparison of the clinical efficacy of enalapril maleate analogs in patients with heart failure and ischemic heart disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54339
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1998 Jul-Aug;61(4):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Dunaev
A E Berezin
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Zaporozhe State Medical University, Ukraine.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1998 Jul-Aug;61(4):20-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination
Echocardiography
Enalapril - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
English Abstract
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
The authors examined 68 patients aged from 42 to 68 years with ischemic heart disease without a history of myocardial infarction and with angina pectoris of exertion functional class 2-3 and circulatory insufficiency class 2 (according to NYHA criteria). The criteria serving as the reason for relating patients to the follow-up group were left-ventricular end-diastolic volume > 160 ml, ejection fraction 0.55, threshold power of endured loads within a range of 71.5 +/- 2.30 watt. After stabilization of the clinical status by means of basic therapy (nitrates, blockers of slow calcium channels, diuretics, antiaggregants), all patients were divided into two follow-up groups. The first group consisted of 36 patients who received renitec (10 mg/24 h), patients of group 2 were given enap in the same dose. The course of treatment lasted 12 weeks. The effectiveness of treatment was controlled by echocardiography according to the standard methods in M- and B-regimens. Analysis of the obtained data showed that within 12-day follow-up renitec demonstrated higher effectiveness and lesser incidence of side-effects than did enap given in the same dose.
PubMed ID
9783102 View in PubMed
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Acquired right ventricular outflow tract obstruction in the recipient twin in twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192654
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Nov 1;38(5):1533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2001
Author
J. Lougheed
B G Sinclair
K. Fung Kee Fung
J L Bigras
G. Ryan
J F Smallhorn
L K Hornberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Nov 1;38(5):1533-8
Date
Nov-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Catheterization
Cause of Death
Disease Progression
Echocardiography
Female
Fetofetal Transfusion - complications - physiopathology
Gestational Age
Hemodynamics
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Morbidity
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Ventricular Outflow Obstruction - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Abstract
The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence and evolution of acquired right ventricular outflow tract obstruction (RVOTO) in the recipient twin in twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).
Twin-twin transfusion syndrome complicates 4% to 26% of diamniotic monochorionic twin gestations and is associated with high fetal morbidity and mortality. Cardiac dysfunction and biventricular hypertrophy may develop in the recipient twin with the potential for RVOTO.
This was a retrospective review of a two-center experience of TTTS to describe the prevalence and evolution of acquired RVOTO in the recipient twin. Right ventricular outflow tract obstruction was diagnosed or excluded by fetal or postnatal echocardiography or clinical assessment.
Of 73 twin pregnancies with TTTS identified between 1994 to 1998, a total of seven (9.6%) were complicated by RVOTO in the recipient twin: two subvalvar/muscular, four valvar and one combined. Of 44 pregnancies with fetal echo, six had in utero RVOTO with antegrade flow diagnosed at gestational ages ranging from 19 to 27 weeks. In utero progression occurred in four cases over a period of four to eight weeks, with the development of RVOT atresia by delivery. Postnatal progression of RVOTO occurred in two cases, one of which required pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty at age two years. Postnatal regression of subvalvar RVOTO occurred in two cases in early infancy. Death related directly or indirectly to the RVOTO occurred in all four patients who developed complete RVOT obliteration.
Right ventricular outflow tract obstruction may occur in the recipient twin of at least 9% of pregnancies complicated by TTTS. Right ventricular outflow tract obstruction progression is common in utero and may worsen neonatal outcome.
PubMed ID
11691536 View in PubMed
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Active and passive reaction of large arterial vessels to sublingual test with nitroglycerin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11465
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1995;72(1-2):67-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B I Mazhbich
T G Komlyagina
S M Mazhbich
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk.
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1995;72(1-2):67-70
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Sublingual
Adult
Aged
Arteries - physiology
Blood pressure
Elasticity
Female
Hemodynamic Processes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitroglycerin - administration & dosage - diagnostic use
Vasodilator Agents
Abstract
The noninvasive method of oscillovasometry, devised previously, was applied to the estimation of arterial pressure, effective radius of large arterial vessels, a number of indices showing elastic vessel properties and change in tone of the vessels on the right upper limb just before sublingual administration of nitroglycerin (0.5 mg) to the patients and 4-5 min after it. A group of 96 patients with different levels of arterial pressure were examined. It was found that all the patients showed a pressure decrease and tachycardia, but about a half of them had a passive response in large arterial vessels in the form of a decrease in the vessel volume, while others showed a decrease in arterial vessel tone (vasodilation), i.e. an active vascular response. From the data we drew the conclusion that there are two types of vascular response (active and passive) and they do not depend on the initial level of arterial pressure. Nitroglycerin probably acts more effectively on large arteries with a high initial tone. The possible mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed.
PubMed ID
8789572 View in PubMed
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Activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems and baseline arterial blood pressure in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91971
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Aftanas L I
Sidorova P V
Pavlov S V
Makhnev V P
Korenek V V
Reva N V
Amstislavskaya T G
Author Affiliation
Psychophysiology Laboratory, State Research Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 4 Timakov Street, 630117, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Electromyography
Emotions - physiology
Galvanic Skin Response - physiology
Heart Rate - physiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Male
Motivation
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Oculomotor Muscles - physiology
Photic Stimulation
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Smoking - physiopathology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present work was to identify possible associations between individual balances in the activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems using a method based on emotional modulation of the startle reaction (EMSR) by motivationally significant emotionally positive and negative contextual visual stimuli and measures of cardiovascular system activity. Studies were performed using healthy males (mean age 30.29 +/- 9.8 years) with normal and first-episode excessive increases in arterial blood pressure (systolic blood pressure to greater than 140 mmHg, diastolic to greater than 90 mmHg). Cluster analysis of EMSR data identified groups of individuals with different activity profiles for the positive and negative reinforcement systems. Groups of subjects with changes in the balance of activity towards a lower level of positive reinforcement system activity (smaller startle reflexes to positive contextual stimuli) or a higher level of negative reinforcement system activity (larger startle reactions to threatening contextual stimuli) showed significantly greater baseline SBP and DBP. The possible mechanisms of the modulatory influences of the balance of system activities on autonomic vascular regulatory processes are discussed.
PubMed ID
18802770 View in PubMed
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645 records – page 1 of 65.