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85 records – page 1 of 9.

[1st Symposium on Nitrates in Stockholm. Conclusion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56131
Source
Med Welt. 1976 Jan 16;27(3):130-1 concl
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-16-1976

[1st Symposium on Nitrates in Stockholm. VI]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56139
Source
Med Welt. 1976 Jan 9;27(2):88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1976

ACE inhibitors captopril and enalapril induce regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54522
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A I Dyadyk
A E Bagriy
I A Lebed
N F Yarovaya
E V Schukina
G G Taradin
Author Affiliation
Department of Postgraduate Therapy Training, Medical University, Donetsk, Ukraine.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Captopril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Diastole - drug effects
Drug Tolerance
Enalapril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Systole - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is frequently noted in patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure not requiring dialysis. Recently, several studies have shown reversal of myocardial hypertrophy in end-stage renal disease with long-term pharmacological control of blood pressure, but it is unclear whether left ventricular mass regresses or normalizes with antihypertensive treatment of patients with earlier stages of chronic renal failure. METHODS: Seventy-two undialysed patients with chronic renal failure, chronic mild-to-moderate hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were randomly assigned in a prospective study to either the captopril (n = 36) or enalapril group (n = 36). Blood pressure measurements, echocardiographic and Doppler parameters were evaluated before treatment and at 6 and 12 months of therapy. RESULTS: During follow-up, six patients developed side-effects including dry cough, taste disturbances, skin rash and gastric intolerance. In the captopril group there was a decrease in mean left ventricular mass index by 12% after 6 months of treatment, which decreased by 20% after 12 months treatment. For enalapril, the average reduction of myocardial mass after 6 months treatment was 14% and after 12 months treatment, the decrease was 19%. In both treatment groups there was significant improvement of left ventricular filling dynamics. No deterioration of left ventricular systolic function was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that antihypertensive monotherapy with the ACE inhibitors, captopril and enalapril, in patients with chronic renal failure results in regression of left ventricular mass index associated with a significant improvement in the diastolic function of the left ventricle without a demonstrable deterioration in left ventricular systolic performance.
PubMed ID
9175047 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the hemodynamic and antioxidant effects of Capoten and prazosin in patients with refractory heart failure]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54537
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
R O Sabadyshyn
B I Rudyk
N H Blinova
O Ia Slipak
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):72-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Antioxidants - therapeutic use
Captopril - therapeutic use
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation
English Abstract
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Prazosin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Overall fifty one patients with chronic cardiac insufficiency (ChCI) were studied for changes in parameters characterizing hemodynamics and lipid peroxidation (LPO) under treatment with kapoten and prazosin. Kapoten was found to be capable of exerting an antioxidant effect and working in ways beneficial for the pulmonary circulation, while prazosin is generally indicated to patients with ChCI presenting with increased end diastolic pressure in the left ventricle. Prazosin activates LPO, for which reason its pro-oxidant action needs to be drug-corrected. Because of marked pharmacologic effects of both drugs in dealing with refractory circulatory insufficiency it is advisable that further studies be made in order that we might be able to determine indications for kapoten and prazosin therapy in coronary patients as well as those with arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathies, valvular defects, ChCI with complications more accurately.
PubMed ID
9333490 View in PubMed
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[A comparison of the clinical efficacy of enalapril maleate analogs in patients with heart failure and ischemic heart disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54339
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1998 Jul-Aug;61(4):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Dunaev
A E Berezin
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Zaporozhe State Medical University, Ukraine.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1998 Jul-Aug;61(4):20-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination
Echocardiography
Enalapril - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
English Abstract
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
The authors examined 68 patients aged from 42 to 68 years with ischemic heart disease without a history of myocardial infarction and with angina pectoris of exertion functional class 2-3 and circulatory insufficiency class 2 (according to NYHA criteria). The criteria serving as the reason for relating patients to the follow-up group were left-ventricular end-diastolic volume > 160 ml, ejection fraction 0.55, threshold power of endured loads within a range of 71.5 +/- 2.30 watt. After stabilization of the clinical status by means of basic therapy (nitrates, blockers of slow calcium channels, diuretics, antiaggregants), all patients were divided into two follow-up groups. The first group consisted of 36 patients who received renitec (10 mg/24 h), patients of group 2 were given enap in the same dose. The course of treatment lasted 12 weeks. The effectiveness of treatment was controlled by echocardiography according to the standard methods in M- and B-regimens. Analysis of the obtained data showed that within 12-day follow-up renitec demonstrated higher effectiveness and lesser incidence of side-effects than did enap given in the same dose.
PubMed ID
9783102 View in PubMed
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The acute dose-dependent effects of ethanol on canine myocardial perfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11527
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
R V Kettunen
J. Timisjärvi
J. Heikkilä
P. Saukko
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Flow Velocity
Coronary Circulation - drug effects
Dogs
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Microspheres
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
The acute effects of ethanol (1.0 g/kg and 1.5 g/kg, n = 4 and n = 5, yielding blood concentrations of 1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/ml and 2.4 +/- 0.3 mg/ml) on myocardial perfusion were studied in anesthetized, thoracotomized, artificially ventilated dogs by using a radioactive microsphere technique. The control group (n = 5) received saline. The smaller dose of ethanol decreased perfusion in the left ventricular myocardium from 0.737 +/- 0.122 to 0.555 +/- 0.122 ml/g/min (NS), whereas the greater dose nonsignificantly increased it, from 0.744 +/- 0.115 to 0.819 +/- 0.119 ml/g/min (p
PubMed ID
7818790 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute intravenous and long-term oral hemodynamic effects of encainide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55611
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1986 Aug 29;58(5):25C-30C
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-1986
Author
M H Sami
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1986 Aug 29;58(5):25C-30C
Date
Aug-29-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Anilides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Arrhythmia - drug therapy
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Encainide
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Heart Ventricles
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The short- and long-term hemodynamic effects of encainide, a new class IC antiarrhythmic agent, were studied in 25 patients (mean age 61 +/- 11) with complex symptomatic ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular dysfunction. Ninety-two percent had previous myocardial infarction and 8% had dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-five percent had congestive heart failure, class III or IV, according to the New York Heart Association. All patients underwent a nuclear ventriculogram performed at least 3 days after discontinuing previous antiarrhythmic drugs. Nuclear ventriculograms were repeated 1 to 6 weeks later while the patients were receiving therapeutic doses of encainide ranging from 75 to 300 [corrected] mg/day. Nuclear ventriculograms were also repeated after 6 months or 1 year of encainide therapy in 16 of these patients. Encainide did not have significant effects on heart rate, blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, systolic or end-diastolic volumes. None of the patients showed a worsening of congestive heart failure during encainide therapy. These results compare favorably with those of other class I antiarrhythmic agents. A review of published reports on the hemodynamic effects of intravenous encainide shows it to have a mild but statistically significant dose-related depressant effect on cardiac function. This effect, however, appears to be no different from that of other newer class I agents.
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Cardiol 1988 Nov 15;62(16):1152
PubMed ID
3092616 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adrenomedullin modulates hemodynamic and cardiac effects of angiotensin II in conscious rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9538
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jun;286(6):R1085-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Marja Luodonpää
Hanna Leskinen
Mika Ilves
Olli Vuolteenaho
Heikki Ruskoaho
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Biocenter Ouli, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jun;286(6):R1085-92
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin II - antagonists & inhibitors - pharmacology
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body Weight - drug effects
Echocardiography
Heart - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Hypertension - chemically induced - prevention & control
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - chemically induced - prevention & control
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Male
Membrane Proteins - biosynthesis - genetics
Norepinephrine - antagonists & inhibitors - pharmacology
Peptides - pharmacology
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - biosynthesis - genetics
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1 - biosynthesis - genetics
Receptors, Peptide - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Telemetry
Vasoconstrictor Agents - antagonists & inhibitors
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
We examined whether adrenomedullin, a vasoactive peptide expressed in the heart, modulates the increase in blood pressure, changes in systolic and diastolic function, and left ventricular hypertrophy produced by long-term administration of ANG II or norepinephrine in rats. Subcutaneous administration of adrenomedullin (1.5 microg.kg(-1).h(-1)) for 1 wk inhibited the ANG II-induced (33.3 microg.kg(-1).h(-1) sc) increase in mean arterial pressure by 67% (P
PubMed ID
14751847 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Agents for the metabolic correction of myocardial energy metabolism in treating patients with ischemic heart disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54076
Source
Lik Sprava. 2000 Mar;(2):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A D Vizyr
O V Kraidashenko
O Ie Berezin
O I Oliinyk
Source
Lik Sprava. 2000 Mar;(2):26-30
Date
Mar-2000
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination
Energy Metabolism - drug effects
English Abstract
Heart - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Myocardium - metabolism
Abstract
Correction of the metabolic link of the natural course of ischemic heart disease (IHD) was found out to be a real reserve of enhancement of therapy efficiency in treating this condition. A total of 137 IHD patients were examined, presenting with functional class II-III exertional angina, their age ranging between 67 to 86 years. Kinds of metabolic complexes to be used in IHD treatment included amino acids, antioxidants, cofactors, energy-providing compounds that enhance efficiency of basic methods of IHD therapy. A positive therapeutic effect of metabolic correction treatments was evidenced by earlier dispelling of electrocardiographic signs of myocardial ischemia, higher tolerance to physical load, improvement in parameters characterizing cardio-hemodynamics.
PubMed ID
10862469 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related morphine kinetics in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59555
Source
Dev Pharmacol Ther. 1993;20(1-2):26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M L Pokela
K T Olkkola
T. Seppälä
M. Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Dev Pharmacol Ther. 1993;20(1-2):26-34
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - blood
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn - blood - growth & development
Injections, Intravenous
Morphine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration, Artificial
Abstract
The pharmacokinetics of morphine was studied in 27 infants receiving a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg morphine after surgery (n = 23) or during mechanical ventilation (n = 4). The pharmacokinetics of morphine varied greatly between the subjects, especially in the neonates. The clearance and half-life varied distinctly with postnatal age. The mean (+/- SD) half-life was 8.1 +/- 8.1 h in 10 neonates younger than 1 week, 5.4 +/- 3.4 h in 10 infants aged from 1 week to 2 months and 2.6 +/- 1.7 h in 7 infants aged from 2 to 6 months. Mean clearance increased significantly with age, being 8.7 +/- 5.8 ml/min/kg in the youngest age group, 11.9 +/- 5.1 ml/min/kg in those aged 1 week to 2 months and 28.0 +/- 8.9 ml/min/kg in those aged 2-6 months, and was also significantly lower in the critically ill infants. The clearance and half-life of morphine begin to approach adult values after the age of 1 month, but great individual variability exists even after that. In order to reduce the risk of overdosing or underdosing, the dose of morphine should be titrated individually.
PubMed ID
7924762 View in PubMed
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85 records – page 1 of 9.