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502 records – page 1 of 51.

A 10-year survey of clinically significant blood culture isolates and antibiotic susceptibilities from adult patients with hematological diseases at a major Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25350
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H. Fredlund
M. Björeman
J. Kjellander
L. Sjöberg
L. Bjorne
A L Ohlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Aerobic - isolation & purification
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination - therapeutic use
Female
Hematologic Diseases - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Leukemia - complications
Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute - complications
Lymphoma - complications
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Retrospective Studies
Septicemia - drug therapy - microbiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In patients treated with cytotoxic drugs granulocytopenia and septicemia are commonly seen. In this 10-year survey 324 blood culture isolates from 184 patients with hematological diseases and septicemia were studied. The distribution of microbiological diagnoses in patients with hematological diseases as well as acute leukemia 1980-1986 was significantly different (p less than 0.01) from an unselected blood culture material from the same period. The differences are mainly seen between Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci. The microbiological spectrum for patients with hematological disease 1987-1989 was also significantly different (p less than 0.05) from the spectrum of the same group of patients 1980-1986 due to higher frequencies of coagulase-negative staphylococci and alpha-streptococci and lower frequency of E. coli in the latter period. 40% of the isolates were gram-positive cocci during the first period and increased to 50% during the second period. The susceptibility testing indicates that trimethoprim/sulfonamide is not as good a choice as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin for oral antibiotic prophylaxis. For intravenous therapy imipenem/cilastatin or the combinations of an aminoglycoside/piperacillin or aminoglycoside/third generation cephalosporin have advantages over aminoglycoside/trimethoprim/sulfa in combination. However, addition of isoxazolylpenicillin or vancomycin now seems necessary to cover the increasing part of gram-positive bacteria causing septicemia in patients with hematological disease.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(4):5151957139
PubMed ID
2218401 View in PubMed
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Abstracts. Seventh annual meeting. The European Society for Paediatric Haematology and Immunology. Oslo, Norway, June 11-13, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41315
Source
Pediatr Res. 1979 Aug;13(8):948-57
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-1979

[A case of severely disturbed hematopoiesis in a 15 year old adolescent treated with levomycetin]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13630
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1965 Jul-Aug;4:33-4
Publication Type
Article

Access to new cardiovascular therapies in Canadian hospitals: a national survey of the formulary process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186545
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Feb;19(2):173-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Stephen J Shalansky
Roohina Virk
Margaret Ackman
Cynthia Jackevicius
Heather Kertland
Ross Tsuyuki
Karin Humphries
Author Affiliation
Pharmacy Department, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. shalansk@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Feb;19(2):173-9
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Canada
Cardiovascular Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Dalteparin - economics - therapeutic use
Data Collection
Drug Utilization
Enoxaparin - economics - therapeutic use
Formularies, Hospital - standards
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hematologic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments - economics - therapeutic use
Peptides - economics - therapeutic use
Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee - economics - organization & administration - standards
Ticlopidine - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Access to new therapies in hospitals depends upon both clinical trial evidence and local Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) committee approval. The process of formulary evaluation by P&T committees is not well-understood.
To describe the formulary decision-making process in Canadian hospitals for cardiovascular medications recently made available on the Canadian market.
Postal survey of hospital pharmacy directors in all Canadian hospitals with more than 50 beds. Target drugs included abciximab, enoxaparin, dalteparin, clopidogrel, eptifibatide and tirofiban.
Of 428 surveys mailed, responses were received from 164 P&T committees representing 350 hospitals for an effective response rate of 82%. While physicians make up the largest proportion of committee membership, pharmacists play an influential role. Information most commonly cited as influencing formulary decisions included published clinical trials (97%), regional guidelines (90%), pharmacoeconomic data (84%), decisions at peer hospitals (73%) and local opinion leaders (60%). However, this information was often not required on formulary applications. Approval timelines varied widely for target medications but there were no regional, hospital or P&T committee characteristics that were independent predictors of early formulary application or approval.
There is wide variability in the time taken for Canadian institutions to adopt new cardiovascular therapies, which is not explained by regional, hospital or P&T committee characteristics. Standardization of the formulary application and evaluation processes, including sharing of information amongst institutions, would lead to broader understanding of the applicable issues, more objectivity and improved efficiency.
PubMed ID
12601443 View in PubMed
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[Activated protein C resistance as a cause of thrombophilia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64478
Source
Rev Invest Clin. 1996 May-Jun;48(3):223-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
G J Ruiz-Argüelles
Author Affiliation
Laboratorios Clínicos de Puebla, México.
Source
Rev Invest Clin. 1996 May-Jun;48(3):223-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antithrombin III - analysis
Blood Coagulation Factors - analysis - physiology
DNA Mutational Analysis
English Abstract
Enzyme Activation
Factor V - genetics
Factor V Deficiency - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Phenotype
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Protein C - physiology
Protein S - analysis
Thrombosis - blood - genetics
Abstract
The proportion of identifiable causes of familial thrombophilia has increased from 5-10% to 60-70% since the identification of activated protein C resistance (aPCR) in February 1993 by Dahlbäck et al. A mutation in the factor V gene (G-->A, 1691) leads to the so called Leiden mutation (R 506 Q) that produces a mutated factor V resistant to the catalytic action of activated protein C (aPC), yet normal in its procoagulant properties. This recently identified aPCR is in Nordic populations the most prevalent and well defined genetic defect associated with disease so far described. Its prevalence in the general population ranges from 0% to up to 15% and suggests that a positive genetic selection pressure has been involved. The aPCR phenotype can be assessed in vitro by measurement of the prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time in the presence of aPC, whereas the aPCR genotype is studied using polymerase chain reaction searching for the Arg to Gln mutation in the coagulation factor V gene. Some acquired conditions such as the presence of lupus anticoagulants, antiphospholipid antibodies, pregnancy, liver disease and contraceptives may lead into the aPCR phenotype. The aPCR search must be the initial step in the study of a patient with thrombophilia, either inherited or acquired aPCR together with protein C, protein S and antithrombin III explain 60 to 70% of cases of familial thrombophilia.
PubMed ID
8966383 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activated protein C resistance (FV:Q506) and pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64090
Source
Thromb Haemost. 1999 Apr;81(4):532-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
P G Lindqvist
P J Svensson
K. Marsaál
L. Grennert
M. Luterkort
B. Dahlbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Pelle.Lindqvist@obst.mas.lu.se
Source
Thromb Haemost. 1999 Apr;81(4):532-7
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activated Protein C Resistance - blood - epidemiology
Factor V - genetics
Female
Humans
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic - blood - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Hemorrhage - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Activated protein C (APC) resistance, due to a point mutation in the factor V gene (FV:Q506), is a major risk factor for venous thromboembolism. To determine the prevalence of APC resistance in a large series of pregnant women, and to elucidate its obstetric consequences, we performed a prospective study in Malmo, Sweden, comprising 2,480 women enrolled in early pregnancy. The presence of APC resistance (the FV:Q506 allele) was determined. The women were interviewed about their medical histories including venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in relatives. The outcome variables were the VTE rate, intrapartum blood loss, and the prevalence of selected pregnancy complications such as fetal loss, pre-eclampsia. and intrauterine growth retardation. The overall prevalence of APC resistance was 11% (270/2480). The APC-resistant subgroup did not differ significantly from the non-APC-resistant subgroup in terms of pregnancy complications, but was characterized by an 8-fold higher risk of VTE (3/270 vs. 3/2210), a lower rate of profuse intrapartum haemorrhage (3.7% vs. 7.9%) (p = 0.02), and less intrapartum blood loss (340 ml vs. 361 ml) (p = 0.04). Despite the high prevalence of APC resistance in this series of gravidae (11%), its presence was unrelated to adverse pregnancy outcome apart from an 8-fold increased risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
10235434 View in PubMed
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Additional value of biochemical tests in suspected acute appendicitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34215
Source
Eur J Surg. 1997 Jul;163(7):533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
S. Hallan
A. Asberg
T H Edna
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Innherred Hospital, Levanger, Norway.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1997 Jul;163(7):533-8
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Appendicitis - diagnosis
Blood Cell Count
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of biochemical tests in diagnosing acute appendicitis. DESIGN: Open prospective study. SETTING: District hospital, Norway. SUBJECTS: 257 patients with suspected acute appendicitis. INTERVENTIONS: Initial diagnostic accuracy of a logistic regression model using available clinical data was compared with results of corresponding models that included an increasing number of inflammatory parameters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The estimated probabilities of appendicitis in different testing groups were analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS: A model including only clinical variables had a mean area under the ROC curve of 0.854. When the total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein concentration, and neutrophil count were added, the model improved significantly to 0.920. CONCLUSION: Biochemical tests are of additional value in a computer model, and the tests should, if used rationally, also provide physicians with important information in the investigation of acute appendicitis.
PubMed ID
9248988 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Advances in hematology. Prenatal diagnosis of disabling hematological diseases. Bone marrow transplantation in acute leukemia and aplastic anemia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27011
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1982 Nov 10;102(31):1630-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1982

[Adverse effects of treatment with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Report to the Adverse Drug Reaction Committee of the National Board of Health and Welfare]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57073
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Jan 31;139(5):284-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-1977

502 records – page 1 of 51.