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Center for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, University of Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22176
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1997 Mar-Apr;14(2):101-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
P J Moe
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1997 Mar-Apr;14(2):101-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cancer Care Facilities
Child
Child, Preschool
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
PubMed ID
9089737 View in PubMed
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The family care coordinator: paving the way to seamless care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141539
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2011 Mar-Apr;28(2):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary Jean Howitt
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Center, Halifax, NS, Canada. MaryJean.Howitt@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2011 Mar-Apr;28(2):107-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Nova Scotia
Abstract
The care of a child/adolescent with cancer or a blood disorder is complex and often long term, involving many interdisciplinary team members across services and geographical boundaries. This experience can be overwhelming for patients and their families, highlighting the need for a family care coordinator (FCC) to help them navigate their care path. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the concept of family care coordination as experienced by the IWK Health Center in Nova Scotia, Canada, with the intent of sharing a valuable model of care with other pediatric hematology/oncology services. Key components of the role are ongoing assessment, education, partnerships, communication, support, and advocacy. Essential resources and pathways are required to implement the role and optimize patient/family outcomes, facilitating consistent and accessible care, enhancing quality and safety, building trust, and gleaning efficiencies. Inherent FCC challenges are identified as time constraints, replacement issues, maintaining professional boundaries, and emotional burnout. A FCC can enable seamless, individualized care for children/adolescents and their families with pediatric oncological and hematological disorders, optimizing the outcomes for all involved.
PubMed ID
20709997 View in PubMed
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Frequent patient-to-patient transmission of hepatitis C virus in a haematology ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56791
Source
Lancet. 1995 Mar 11;345(8950):603-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1995
Author
T. Allander
A. Gruber
M. Naghavi
A. Beyene
T. Söderström
M. Björkholm
L. Grillner
M A Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1995 Mar 11;345(8950):603-7
Date
Mar-11-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amino Acid Sequence
Base Sequence
Blood Component Transfusion
Cross Infection - epidemiology
DNA Primers
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Transmission, Horizontal
Environmental Exposure
Genotype
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Hematology
Hepacivirus - genetics
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Patients' Rooms
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Viral - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Blood transfusion is a well-documented route of transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, a persisting high frequency of HCV infections was recorded in our haematology ward even after screening of blood donors had been introduced. We investigated the viral strains in 37 patients with haematological malignant diseases who had developed hepatitis C when treated in the ward during 1990-93. 17 of the patients acquired hepatitis C despite being transfused only with blood components screened by second-generation anti-HCV tests. The viral strains were characterised by PCR genotyping and nucleotide sequencing of the hypervariable region of the E2 gene. Five clusters of closely related or identical viruses were found involving 2, 3, 4, 6, and 15 patients, respectively. Blood components could be ruled out as the common source of infection because no donor had given blood to all patients sharing a specific strain, and even donors whose blood had been given to several patients were negative for HCV RNA. All patients in each cluster had been treated in the ward during overlapping periods. These findings suggest that despite strict hygienic control, HCV transmission occurred between patients treated in the same hospital setting, as has previously been reported in a smaller group of haemodialysis patients.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Jul 15;346(8968):1907603261
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Jun 3;345(8962):1442-37760638
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Jun 3;345(8962):14437605501
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Jun 3;345(8962):1443-47760639
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Jun 3;345(8962):1444-57760640
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Mar 11;345(8950):599-6007898172
PubMed ID
7898176 View in PubMed
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Identifying a hepatitis B outbreak by molecular surveillance: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16469
Source
BMJ. 2006 Feb 11;332(7537):343-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-2006

[Organization of the pediatric hematological service in the Tomsk district]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41147
Source
Pediatriia. 1980;(5):63-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980

Pediatric hematology/oncology in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209189
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1997 Mar-Apr;14(2):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Durnov
G. Mentkevich
Author Affiliation
Institute for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Russian Academy of Medical Science, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1997 Mar-Apr;14(2):103-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cancer Care Facilities
Child
Child, Preschool
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Hematologic Neoplasms - therapy
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Neoplasms - therapy
Russia
PubMed ID
9089738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Plasma exchange in Canada. The Canadian Apheresis Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229447
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 15;142(6):557-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1990
Author
G A Rock
G W Tricklebank
C A Kasaboski
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 15;142(6):557-62
Date
Mar-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease - therapy
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Humans
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Multiple Sclerosis - therapy
Nervous System Diseases - therapy
Plasma Exchange - adverse effects - methods - utilization
Prospective Studies
Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic - therapy
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Since 1982 the Canadian Apheresis Study Group (CASG) has collected data on plasma exchange activities in Canada. In 1987, 5907 such procedures were carried out on 700 patients for more than 22 different diseases; this represented an increase of 28% over the figure for 1982. A shift in activity has occurred over the years; originally hematologic disorders accounted for most of the procedures; however, in 1987, 60% of the exchanges were done to treat neurologic disorders, mainly myasthenia gravis and acute and chronic Guillain-Barré syndrome. Several prospective randomized clinical trials have recently been completed by the CASG in the hope of determining the optimal application of plasma exchange. These studies, currently under review, include 168 patients with multiple sclerosis, 100 with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and 43 with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Reactions occur in 12% of cases; they are usually minor and are limited to circumoral paresthesia, mild hypertension or hypotension and hives.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Apr 3;1(7962):711-556532
Cites: Transfusion. 1989 Feb;29(2):124-72919422
Cites: Blood. 1977 Sep;50(3):413-7560229
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1979 Jul;22(7):703-10454499
Cites: Blood. 1979 Oct;54(4):842-9573148
Cites: Muscle Nerve. 1980 Nov-Dec;3(6):468-827453714
Cites: Lancet. 1981 Nov 7;2(8254):1005-76118475
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 May 12;308(19):1124-96339939
Cites: Lancet. 1983 May 7;1(8332):10436133078
Cites: Neurology. 1983 Nov;33(11):1444-526685237
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Mar 22;310(12):762-716199669
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Feb 20;314(8):461-53511382
Cites: Transfusion. 1987 May-Jun;27(3):234-73109084
Cites: Infusionsther Klin Ernahr. 1987 Sep;14 Suppl 4:4-63119490
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Jan 29;1(8005):26464800
PubMed ID
2178759 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2001 Dec;37(18):2421-5; discussion 2425-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
B G Solheim
F. Wesenberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Immunology, Rikshospitalet, The National Hospital University of Oslo, NO-0027 Oslo, Norway. bjarte.solheim@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2001 Dec;37(18):2421-5; discussion 2425-7
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Component Transfusion - methods - standards - trends
Blood Loss, Surgical - prevention & control
Child
Forecasting
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Humans
Abstract
Blood product transfusions can be life saving and must be considered in the supportive care of children of any age with underlying oncological or haematological problems, as well as after major surgery or after serious trauma. Paediatric transfusions are particularly challenging because life-long effects of transfusion complications are more durable and serious in children than in adults, in whom the median age at transfusion is >70 years (Tynell E, Norda R, Shanwell A, Björkman A. Long-term survival in transfusion recipients in Sweden, 1993. Transfusion 2001, 41, 251-255). While the general indications for transfusions in paediatric patients are similar to adults, the threshold, volumes and infusion rates for transfusions vary with age. In this Update, we discuss current blood products, then suggest transfusion "triggers" in major surgery and haematological and oncologic practice. Finally, future developments and new possibilities are considered.
PubMed ID
11720837 View in PubMed
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[Treatment with growth factors and cytokines in hematologic diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22631
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 10;116(12):1465-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1996
Author
A. Waage
I M Dahl
S A Evensen
H. Holte
J. Lamvik
K. Sletnes
F. Wisløff
Author Affiliation
Hematologisk seksjon, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 10;116(12):1465-9
Date
May-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cytokines - therapeutic use
English Abstract
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor - therapeutic use
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor - therapeutic use
Growth Substances - therapeutic use
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Humans
Interferon-alpha - therapeutic use
Lymphoma - therapy
Multiple Myeloma - therapy
Norway
Practice Guidelines
Abstract
The Norwegian Society of Haematology has worked out guidelines for the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor and interferon alpha in clinical haematological practice. We recommend not using growth factors as a routine to prevent or to treat fever in patients with granulocytopenia induced by cytostatics, or patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. At present such treatment should be restricted to clinical trials. The same conclusion was reached in regard to use of erythropoietin in the case of myelodysplastic syndromes. Harvesting of stem cells from peripheral blood is a well documented indication for administration of growth factors. Interferon alpha as maintenance treatment for cases of multiple myeloma and low grade malignant lymphoma delays progression of the disease but does not improve chance of survival. There is no documentation of improved quality of life. Use of interferon alpha is not justified as a routine treatment for multiple myeloma. In chronic myelogenous leukemia, interferon alpha seems to be equal to or better than hydroxyurea, and may be considered for patients who cannot undergo allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 10;116(18):22158801671
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 20;116(19):2352-38804216
PubMed ID
8650635 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.