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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Cardiovascular effects of norepinephrine thermogenesis in warm- and cold- acclimatized rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298697
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-51. 14 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1963
l\lv /"• h.h1\. I 1 h ·~ , I1'-~. \•JC, / \\.. Cardiovascular System Metabolism Levarte renol Heat Production (Biology) Exposure Rats Project 8237 -02 Evonuk, E., J.P. Hannon Available from OTS ln ASTIA collection Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory, United States Ai r Force 1. (AF SC) , APO
  1 document  
Author
Evonuk, Eugene
Hannon, John P.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-51. 14 p.
Date
March 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1599343
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Cardiovascular System
Metabolism
Levarterenol
Heat production (biology)
Abstract
The cardiovascular and metabolic actions of norepinephrine (NE} and their interrelationships were studied at normal room temperature in anesthetized, warm-acclimatized (W-A) (26° +/- 1° C) and cold-acclimatized (C-A) (3° +/- 1° C} rats. Norepinephrine caused a greater increase in the cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume and right atrial pressure in the C-A animals than it did in the W-A animals. During the early metabolic response to NE (i. e. up to 25% increase in O2 consumption) there was a marked increase in the arterial pressure of both W-A and C-A rats, with the latter showing the greater maximum response. Beyond the 25% level of increased metabolism the arterial pressure and concomitantly the systemic resistance of the C-A animals declined sharply to the preinfusion levels, where they remained throughout the course of infusion. In contrast, the arterial pressure and systemic resistance of the W-A animals remained high. It was concluded that norepinephrine calorigenesis in the C-A rat is supported by an increased cardiac reserve capacity and an ability to preferentially reduce the systemic resistance to actively metabolizing areas (i.e. the viscera}.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-51
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The effect of induced hypoxia on thermoregulation and cardiopulmonary function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298678
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-19. 46 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1963
which is pro- VI. duced under hypoxia. The lethal threshold of acutely ~-, t t "'"' CON 'QDTJL'" .~ PL'ni1 /', D\I !\ r.1t""'!. ;r~D t\r:E A"( v 'f'\ I 11v\ iL.11'\r~•\. 1 / 1-\i ~'·-: ;~._.·:-.:-i~J , K.. Hypoxia Heat Production (Biology) Shivering Exposure Heart Lungs Dogs Project
  1 document  
Author
Lim, T.P.K.
Luft, U.C.
Author Affiliation
Lovelace Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-19. 46 p.
Date
January 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3484881
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Dogs
Cold Temperature
Hypoxia
Heat production (biology)
Shivering
Exposure
Heart
Lungs
Abstract
The effect of induced hypoxia on body temperature regulation and cardiopulmonary function is assessed in anesthetized dogs under warm, neutral and cold environments. Hypoxia acts differently to heat conservation (shivering) and heat dissipation (thermal panting) mechanisms: the former is suppressed, while the latter is facilitated. It is also found that the suppression of shivering is partly due to the hypocapnia which is produced under hypoxia. The lethal threshold of acutely induced hypoxia is at the inspiratory O2 level of approximately 3 per cent in the neutral and cold environments, whereas it is at 5 per cent in the warm environment. Under hypoxia, the total ventilation is increased two- to threefold. The alveolar ventilation, however, is augmented to a lesser degree with a progressive increase in physiological dead space. Contrary to respiration, the cardiac output is only slightly increased (less than 30 per cent over the control value) under hypoxia.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-19
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Evaluation of glycine in frostbite prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298731
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical report TR-57-24. 13 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
November 1957
  1 document  
Author
Beavers, William R.
Covino, Benjamin G.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical report TR-57-24. 13 p.
Date
November 1957
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
938140
Keywords
Humans
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Glycine
Heat production (biology)
Metabolism
Abstract
Under many operational situations, military personnel are unable adequately to increase heat production by muscle activity in response to cold stress. An agent capable of increasing visceral heat production might be useful in the prevention of cold injury. Glycine, an amino acid with a high specific dynamic action, was given in 30 gm. oral doses to six young adult males. The individuals served as their own controls when receiving 30 gm. glucose. In a 29° C. room 1 hour after ingestion, glycine produced an average 9.2% increase in resting metabolism. In a -17.8° C. (0° F.) cold room 2 hours after ingestion of glycine, metabolism continued higher and the subject had higher toe, forehead, and average body temperatures. No differences were noted in finger temperatures, but forefinger blood flow was greater when glycine was ingested. Glycine may be of practical value in increasing heat production under certain conditions.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.57-24
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Influence of hypoxia on thermal homeostasis in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298662
Source
Techincal documentary report TDR-61-55.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
appreciably in- fluence mean skin temperature in a neutral, cold, or IIV. warm environment. Rectal temperature during hypoxia is not different from that during room air b.E_eathing in IV. f \ VI. \ } .___.,,; Cot\ \C'(\ '""'-,~ · 1 . I ) \ 'x ·· d ~~~ l \ u '\ \_ Anoxia Heat Production (Biology
  1 document  
Author
Lim, Thomas P.K.
Luft, Ulrich C.
Author Affiliation
Lovelace Foundation for Medical Education and research, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Source
Techincal documentary report TDR-61-55.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2113500
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Anoxia
Heat production (biology)
Exposure
Body temperature
Metabolism
Circulation
Respiration
Perspiration
Abstract
The influence of induced hypoxia on core and shell temperatures, metabolic rate, perspiration and other related cardiopulmonary parameters has been studied in six healthy subjects under neutral, cold and warm environmental conditions. Mean skin temperatures in all three thermal environments with room air breathing are not different from those in similar environmental conditions with hypoxia. It is concluded that a hypoxic level of tracheal PO² = 65 mm Hg does not appreciably influence mean skin temperature in a neutral, cold, or warm environment. Rectal temperature during hypoxia is not different from that during room air breathing in neutral and cold environments. However, this is not true in a warm environment, when rectal temperature is significantly higher during hypoxia than that during room air breathing. The mechanism of this phenomenon cannot be explained on the basis of thermal balance alone. No great influence of hypoxia on shivering or perspiration can be detected under the experimental conditions. The synergistic actions of hypoxic and thermal stresses on total ventilation and heart rate are demonstrated.
Notes
61-55
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Maintaining the thermal balance in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298669
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-24. 15 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1963
. These V. characteristics are schematically shown in fourteen VI. figures. ,,-... \ I .... _, Co~'<'ORTIU ~ \ · 1 so." D'( ~~~rt 1ni) '' r·r= r. 1. i \lJ I J Li i" ·.1\. / .n.\·_: i\ . .J:\.n\J[, 1-\ \.. Heat Production (Biology) Body Temperature Metabolism Man Project 8237-02 Contract
  1 document  
Author
Carlson, L.D.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-24. 15 p.
Date
January 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1192311
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Heat production (biology)
Body temperature
Metabolism
Abstract
A report is presented which briefly characterizes the heat production of the human and the heat exchange with the environment. The mechanisms whereby the temperature control system operates are presented. These characteristics are schematically shown in fourteen figures.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-24
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Metabolic and thermal responses to muscular exertion in the cold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298660
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-52. 26 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
suggested that habituation to cold leads to a lower set point of the thermosensitive cells of the thermoregulatory center , so that vasodilation impulses are discharged at a lower temperature. ,-.... \. l __/ CONSORTIU,V\ LIBRARY, ANC~!OR/-\GE, AK. Metabolism Heat Production (Biology
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, K.L.
Stromme, S.
Elsner, R.W.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Work Physiology, Blindern, Oslo, Norway
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-52. 26 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2239939
Keywords
Humans
Cold Temperature
Metabolism
Heat production (biology)
Exercise
Exposure
Physiology
Abstract
The metabolic and thermal responses to muscular exertion in a cold environment were studied in outdoor and indoor workers. The metabolic rate in all subjects during exercise was higher in the cold environment than in the warm environment at low levels of work; at higher workloads it was the same. In the cold environment there was a tendency towards lower oxygen uptake of the outdoor workers than of the indoor workers at low levels of work; at high levels it was essentially the same. Differences in skin temperature and onset of rewarming indicate an adaptability to cold of the vasomotor control mechanism of the peripheral circulation. It is suggested that habituation to cold leads to a lower set point of the thermosensitive cells of the thermoregulatory center, so that vasodilation impulses are discharged at a lower temperature.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-52
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Pulmonary effects of cold acclimatization and norepinephrine calorigenesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298700
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-57. 10 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1963
s light increase / " l I ..... _, l. Res pira tory System 2. Leva rte r e n ol 3 . Heat Production (Biology) 4. Exposure 5. Rats I. Projec t 8237-0 1 ll. Evonuk, E . , J.P. Hannon ill. Available from OTS IV. In DDC collection - - _ __,___ -- - - - -- - - - f
  1 document  
Author
Evonuk, Eugene
Hannon, John P.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-57. 10 p.
Date
June 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
967385
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Respiratory System
Oxygen
Levarterenol
Heat production (biology)
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Abstract
The effects of cold acclimatization on pulmonary function during norepinephrine calorigenesis were studied. Norepinephrine resulted in a marked increase (85%) in the pulmonary minute volume in both the warm- and cold-acclimatized rats. This increase in the warm-acclimatized rats was accomplished entirely by increasing the respiratory rate, whereas in the cold-acclimatized rats the increase in pulmonary minute volume was achieved for the most part by increasing the tidal volume with a slight increase in respiratory rate. Cold acclimatization was associated with a greater "efficiency of oxygen extraction" before, during and after the infusion of norepinephrine.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-57
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Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-12. 18 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
."1'1 ~-: Q i, ..... I ., ...... IJI Shivering Heat Production (Biology) Body Temperature Bibliography Project 8238-22 Contract AF41(657)-344 Univ. of California at Los Angeles Stuart, D. G. Available from OTS In ASTIA collection Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory, United States Air
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-12. 18 p.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1385261
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Shivering
Heat production (biology)
Body temperature
Abstract
This report reviews relationships between shivering and other mechanisms of temperature regulation. Included are data relating to: {I) the concept that shivering, together with other so-called "physiological mechanisms" of combating cold, is but one aspect of biological resourcefulness in the cold; (2) a neuromotor definition of shivering; (3) the concept that shivering comes into play to increase heat production after mechanisms of heat retention are insufficient to prevent a loss of body heat in the face of a rapid drop in ·environmental temperature; { 4) shivering versus nonshivering thermogenic activity during brief and sudden drops in environmental temperature; and (5) the adequate physiological stimulus to evoke shivering.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-12
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Thermal and metabolic measurements on a reindeer at rest and in exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298767
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-54. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
. exercise. Some aspects of the hea t producing and heat Ill. d issipating mechanisms were inves tigated in the rein- deer, an example of a large well adapted Arc ti c I IV. mammal. ( \ \ I ...... v. VI. I- ~- I /" ....... \. -) Metabolism Heat Production (Biology) Body T emperatur e
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Houpt, T.R.
Andersen, K.L.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-54. 34 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2430510
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Reindeer
Metabolism
Heat production (Biology)
Body temperature
Arctic Regions
Fur
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Abstract
Adaptations which equip a mammal to cope with the cold stresses of the Arctic environment must at the same time be accompanied by responses which enable it to dissipate large quantities of heat produced during exercise. Some aspects of the heat producing and heat dissipating mechanisms were investigated in the reindeer, an example of a large well adapted Arctic mammal. The oxygen consumption of a reindeer while standing quietly was 606 ml/minute; while pulling a heavily loaded sled, 2390 ml/minute. The evaporative heat loss from the respiratory tract of a standing reindeer was 12 kcal/hour, or seven percent of the heat production; of a vigorously exercising reindeer, 130 kcal/hour, or 20 percent of the heat production. The temperature of the air expired at the nostril was as low as 14° C when the reindeer was standing in a wind at -16° C, and about 30° C at ambient temperatures near 0° C. After the animal exercised, the nostril temperature was 35° to 37° C. The heat production of the rumen ingesta was found to be as high as 0.09 kcal/hour per kilogram of body weight soon after feeding, or 5% to 10% of the basal heat production. The average surface temperature of the thinly furred parts of the reindeer was 5° to 11° C above ambient temperature, the hoof temperature 5° to 9° above ambient and the thickly furred parts only 2° to 4° C above ambient when the reindeer was conserving heat during rest. On the other hand, during vigorous exercise the thinly furred surface was 18° to 22° C above ambient temperature, the hoof was 21° to 28° C above ambient, and the thickly furred surfaces 12° to 15° C above ambient.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-54
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Thermal and metabolic response of the Kalahari Bushmen to moderate cold exposure at night.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298692
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-44. 29 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1963
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Hildes, J.A.
Jackson, D.C.
Andersen, H.T.
Author Affiliation
John B. Pierce Laboratory, New Haven, Conn.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-44. 29 p.
Date
September 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2107544
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Men
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Body temparature
Heat production (biology)
Shivering
Abstract
Studies were made of 10 adult male Bushmen and four Europeans during night-long exposure to ambient temperatures of approximately 6° C using only single-blanket sleeping bags . Four Bushmen were studied twice. Measurements were made of oxygen consumption, rectal and skin temperatures, muscle activity and sleep. Five Bushmen were also studied during a night with extra blankets. Rectal temperature of both groups started at about 36. 8° C, but in the Bushmen fell O. 7° C lower than in the Europeans during the cold night. Calculated mean body temperature also fell lower in the Bushmen. Mean skin temperature of the Bushmen started higher but was the same as that of the Europeans at the end of the night, although the foot temperatures of the Bushmen were lower. The heat production of both groups was the same at the start, expressed as kcal per kg lean body mass per hour (approximately 1.5). Both rose during the cold night but the Bushmen increase was only half as great as that of the Europeans . Shivering in the Bushmen was less than in the Europeans and sleep was interrupted less in the Bushmen. The results indicate a difference between Bushmen and Europeans in response to cold.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-44
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11 records – page 1 of 2.