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379 records – page 1 of 38.

Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Mar 17;68(12):1328
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-1971
Author
J. Daugård
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Mar 17;68(12):1328
Date
Mar-17-1971
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Fever - drug therapy
Heat Exhaustion - diagnosis
Humans
Hypocalcemia - diagnosis
Hypotension - diagnosis
Sweden
PubMed ID
5573808 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acclimatization to cold in Antarctic SCUBA divers

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76523
Source
Pages 53-57 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
heat production was calculated from oxygen consumption, using the method of Weir (10). rJI (I) > 0 .,._ 0 (I) .0 E :::> z 200 150 100 50 O 01 02 03 II 13 Divers =nO _ 040609 10 Non-Divers Figure 4. Dives per subject, from December 1981 to November 1982. Thermal
  1 document  
Author
Bridgman, S. A.
Author Affiliation
British Antarctic Survey and Centre for Offshore Health, Robert Gordon's Institute of Technology, Aberdeen, Scotland
Source
Pages 53-57 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Body immersion experiments
Cold induced vasodilatation
Metabolic heat production
Oxygen consumption
Resting metabolic rate (RMR)
Documents
Less detail

Acoustic emission during cooling and heating of aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycols of molecular masses from 300 to 3000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9640
Source
Cryobiology. 2003 Aug;47(1):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
A V Zinchenko
V D Zinchenko
Author Affiliation
Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 23 Pereyaslavskaya str., Kharkov 61015, Ukraine. cryo@online.kharkov.ua
Source
Cryobiology. 2003 Aug;47(1):40-3
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Cold
Cryopreservation
Crystallization
Heat
Molecular Weight
Polyethylene Glycols - chemistry
Solutions - chemistry
Water - chemistry
Abstract
The object of this research is to study acoustic emissions (AE) in aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) of molecular masses from 300 to 3000 during cooling at 100 degrees C/min and heating at 70 degrees C/min in the temperature range from 0 to -196 degrees C. The dependence of AE intensity on PEG concentration and molecular mass is analysed. The AE intensity correlated with the crystalline to amorphous phase ratio in the frozen system.
PubMed ID
12963411 View in PubMed
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Acute fatal effects of short-lasting extreme temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: evidence across a century of change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107127
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Daniel Oudin Åström
Bertil Forsberg
Sören Edvinsson
Joacim Rocklöv
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; bAgeing and Living Conditions Programme, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; cCentre for Population Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; and dDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.
We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.
Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.
Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.
PubMed ID
24051892 View in PubMed
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Acute impacts of extreme temperature exposure on emergency room admissions related to mental and behavior disorders in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256377
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiang Wang
Eric Lavigne
Hélène Ouellette-kuntz
Bingshu E Chen
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Environmental Issues Division, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Canada. Electronic address: wanqus@gmail.com.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nonlinear Dynamics
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extreme ambient temperature on hospital emergency room visits (ER) related to mental and behavioral illnesses in Toronto, Canada.
A time series study was conducted using health and climatic data from 2002 to 2010 in Toronto, Canada. Relative risks (RRs) for increases in emergency room (ER) visits were estimated for specific mental and behavioral diseases (MBD) after exposure to hot and cold temperatures while using the 50th percentile of the daily mean temperature as reference. Poisson regression models using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) were used. We adjusted for the effects of seasonality, humidity, day-of-the-week and outdoor air pollutants.
We found a strong association between MBD ER visits and mean daily temperature at 28?C. The association was strongest within a period of 0-4 days for exposure to hot temperatures. A 29% (RR=1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.53) increase in MBD ER vists was observed over a cumulative period of 7 days after exposure to high ambient temperature (99th percentile vs. 50th percentile). Similar associations were reported for schizophrenia, mood, and neurotic disorers. No significant associations with cold temperatures were reported.
The ecological nature and the fact that only one city was investigated.
Our findings suggest that extreme temperature poses a risk to the health and wellbeing for individuals with mental and behavior illnesses. Patient management and education may need to be improved as extreme temperatures may become more prevalent with climate change.
PubMed ID
24332428 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and failure of adaptation to extreme natural environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5798
Source
Forensic Sci. 1975 Feb;5(1):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
A W Sloan
Source
Forensic Sci. 1975 Feb;5(1):81-9
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Anoxia
Arctic Regions
Body Temperature Regulation
Environment
Frostbite
Heat Exhaustion
Humans
Hypothermia
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Although the environmental stresses to which man is subjected on the ground are less than those commonly encountered in aviation or under water, they may still exceed an individual's powers of adaptation. Extremes of temperature, commonly encountered in the Arctic or the tropics, may occur in regions of normally temperate climate and lead to failure of temperature regulation, resulting in hypothermia, frostbite, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke. High mountains impose additional hazards due to high winds and lack of oxygen, and deep mines are dangerous work-places because of high temperature and humidity. Some physiological acclimatization occurs in extreme natural environments and the dangers may be reduced by appropriate clothing, diet and behaviour.
PubMed ID
1132866 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related alterations in expression of apoptosis regulatory proteins and heat shock proteins in rat skeletal muscle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83286
Source
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2006 Jan;1762(1):103-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Chung Linda
Ng Yuk-Chow
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA 17033, USA.
Source
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2006 Jan;1762(1):103-9
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins - metabolism
Caspases - metabolism
DNA Fragmentation
Gene Expression Regulation
Heat-Shock Proteins - metabolism
Mitochondrial Proteins - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry - enzymology - metabolism
Rats
Abstract
Aging of skeletal muscle is often accompanied by muscle atrophy and it appears that apoptosis plays an important role in this process. The detailed mechanism(s) is not completely understood, however. In this study, we examined expression of the apoptosis regulatory proteins as well as the heat shock proteins, which have been shown to modulate the apoptotic process in certain cell types, in order to more completely elucidate apoptotic signaling in aged skeletal muscle. To more specifically identify alterations that are likely to be the result of aging, we compared 16-month-old middle-aged (MD) and 29-month-old senescent (SE) male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats in our study. Our results show that the degree of DNA laddering was higher in SE compared to MD rats. Using total tissue homogenates we examined the level of expression of several apoptosis-related proteins in two categories: mitochondria-associated proteins and caspases. Of the mitochondria-associated proteins, the levels of p53 showed a significant increase in SE compared to MD rats. There was also a significant increase in the expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and Apaf-1 in SE rats over that of MD rats; cytochrome c and AIF levels remained unchanged, however. Regarding the caspases, there were increases in the levels of pro-caspases-12 and -7 and cleaved caspase-9, although the levels of pro- and cleaved caspase-3 as well as cleaved caspase-12 remained unchanged. Furthermore, our results showed significant increases in HSP27, HSP60, and the inducible HSP70. These data show that in rat skeletal muscle increased apoptosis occurs between middle-age and senescence, indicating an aging-related increase in apoptosis in skeletal muscle. The involvement of different apoptotic pathways in the aging process is suggested by the selective alterations in the apoptosis regulatory proteins. The increased expression of the HSPs suggests a relationship between HSPs and the aging-related apoptotic process.
PubMed ID
16139996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related changes in HSP25 expression in basal ganglia and cortex of F344/BN rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98106
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2010 Mar 19;472(2):90-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-2010
Author
Anisha A Gupte
Jill K Morris
Hongyu Zhang
Gregory L Bomhoff
Paige C Geiger
John A Stanford
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, United States.
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2010 Mar 19;472(2):90-3
Date
Mar-19-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Basal Ganglia - metabolism
Cerebral Cortex - metabolism
HSP27 Heat-Shock Proteins - biosynthesis
HSP72 Heat-Shock Proteins - biosynthesis
Phosphorylation
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - biosynthesis
Abstract
Normal aging is associated with chronic oxidative stress. In the basal ganglia, oxidative stress may contribute to the increased risk of Parkinson's disease in the elderly. Neurons are thought to actively utilize compensatory defense mechanisms, such as heat shock proteins (HSPs), to protect from persisting stress. Despite their protective role, little is known about HSP expression in the aging basal ganglia. The purpose of this study was to examine HSP expression in striatum, substantia nigra, globus pallidus and cortex in 6-, 18- and 30-month-old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats. We found robust age-related increases in phosphorylated and total HSP25 in each brain region studied. Conversely, HSP72 (the inducible form of HSP70) was reduced with age, but only in the striatum. p38 MAPK, a protein implicated in activating HSP25, did not change with age, nor did HSC70 (the constitutive form of HSP70), or HSP60. These results suggest that HSP25 is especially responsive to age-related stress in the basal ganglia.
PubMed ID
20144690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aging influences multiple indices of oxidative stress in the heart of the Fischer 344/NNia x Brown Norway/BiNia rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83665
Source
Redox Rep. 2007;12(4):167-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Asano Shinichi
Rice Kevin M
Kakarla Sunil
Katta Anjaiah
Desai Devashish H
Walker Ernest M
Wehner Paulette
Blough Eric R
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia 25755-1090, USA.
Source
Redox Rep. 2007;12(4):167-80
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Aldehydes - metabolism
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Blood Pressure - physiology
Female
Heart - physiopathology
Heat-Shock Proteins - metabolism
Immunoblotting
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism - pathology
Oxidative Stress
Phosphorylation
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Regression Analysis
Signal Transduction - physiology
Superoxides - metabolism
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
We report the influence of aging on multiple markers of oxidative-nitrosative stress in the heart of adult (6-month), aged (30-month) and very aged (36-month) Fischer 344/NNiaHSd x Brown Norway/BiNia (F344/NXBN) rats. Compared to adult (6-month) hearts, indices of oxidative (superoxide anion [O2*-], 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE]) and nitrosative (protein nitrotyrosylation) stress were 34.1 +/- 28.1%, 186 +/- 28.1% and 94 +/- 5.8% higher, respectively, in 36-month hearts and these findings were highly correlated with increases in left ventricular wall thickness (r > 0.669; r > 0.710 and P
PubMed ID
17705987 View in PubMed
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379 records – page 1 of 38.