Skip header and navigation

Refine By

34 records – page 1 of 4.

[Acute myocardial infarction of the right ventricle]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55578
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Mar 2;149(10):651-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2-1987

Age-associated changes in hearts of male Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79665
Source
Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2006;36(4):427-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Walker Ernest M
Nillas Michael S
Mangiarua Elsa I
Cansino Sylvestre
Morrison Ryan G
Perdue Romaine R
Triest William E
Wright Gary L
Studeny Mark
Wehner Paulette
Rice Kevin M
Blough Eric R
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Joan C Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25704, USA. walkere@marshall.edu
Source
Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2006;36(4):427-38
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Arrhythmia - pathology - physiopathology
Disease Models, Animal
Echocardiography - methods
Heart - physiopathology
Heart Diseases - pathology - physiopathology
Heart Ventricles - pathology - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - pathology - physiopathology
Male
Myocardium - pathology
Organ Size
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - pathology - physiopathology
Abstract
Aging is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, dilatation, and fibrosis of the heart. The Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 (F344/BNF1) rat is recommended for age-related studies by the National Institutes on Aging because this hybrid rat lives longer and has a lower rate of pathological conditions than inbred rats. However, little is known about age-associated changes in cardiac and aortic function and structure in this model. This study evaluated age-related cardiac changes in male F344/BNF1 rats using ECHO, gross, and microscopic examinations. Rats aged 6-, 30-, and 36-mo were anesthetized and two-dimensional ECHO measurements, two-dimensional guided M-mode, Doppler M-mode, and other recordings from parasternal long- and short-axis views were obtained using a Phillips 5500 ECHO system with a 12 megahertz transducer. Hearts and aortas from sacrificed rats were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The ECHO studies revealed persistent cardiac arrhythmias (chiefly PVCs) in 72% (13/18) of 36-mo rats, 10% (1/10) of 30-mo rats, and none in 6-mo rats (0/16). Gross and microscopic studies showed left ventricular (LV) dilatation, borderline to mild hypertrophy, and areas of fibrosis that were common in 36-mo rats, less evident in 30-mo rats, and absent in 6-mo rats. Aging was associated with mild to moderate decreases of LV diastolic and systolic function. Thus, male F344/BN F1 rats demonstrated progressive age-related (a) decline in cardiac function (diastolic and systolic indices), (b) LV structural changes (chamber dimensions, volumes, and wall thicknesses), and (c) persistent arrhythmias. These changes are consistent with those in humans. The noninvasive ECHO technique offers a means to monitor serial age-related cardiac failure and therapeutic responses in the same rats over designated time intervals.
PubMed ID
17127729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brachial artery hyperaemic blood flow velocity and left ventricular geometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136121
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2012 Apr;26(4):242-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
S J Järhult
J. Sundström
L. Lind
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. susann.jarhult@medsci.uu.se
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2012 Apr;26(4):242-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Brachial Artery - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography, Doppler
Female
Heart Ventricles - pathology - ultrasonography
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Hyperemia - physiopathology
Male
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Ventricular Remodeling - physiology
Abstract
Cardiovascular risk factors and carotid atherosclerosis relate to blood flow velocity in the brachial artery during induced hyperaemia. This relation proved to be particularly strong when using the hyperaemic systolic to diastolic blood flow velocity (SDFV) ratio. In this study, we further investigated this ratio in relation to the left ventricular (LV) geometry in a cross-sectional analysis. In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors study, 1016 seventy-year-olds participated. Blood flow velocity during hyperaemia of the brachial artery by Doppler was analysed. Echocardiography was performed, allowing analysis of LV geometry, categorised into four different groups: normal, concentric remodelling, concentric and eccentric hypertrophy. The SDFV ratio increased in subjects with concentric LV-remodelling (P=0.006) or LV-hypertrophy (P=0.001), but not in those with eccentric hypertrophy (P=0.12) when compared with the group with normal LV geometry. These associations remained significant after adjustment for gender, blood pressure, blood glucose, body mass index and antihypertensive treatment. The SDFV ratio in the brachial artery was related to concentric geometry of the LV in an elderly population sample, suggesting this new hemodynamic variable as a marker of increased afterload. Future studies have to determine if the SDFV ratio is a powerful predictor of future CV events, in addition to LV geometry.
PubMed ID
21412263 View in PubMed
Less detail

Calculation of right ventricular stroke volume in short-axis MR images using the equation of the tricuspid plane.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128995
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jan;32(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Stina Hellstrandh Jorstig
Anders Kähäri
Kent Emilsson
Per Thunberg
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. stina.jorstig@orebroll.se
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jan;32(1):5-11
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Heart Atria - pathology - physiopathology
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - pathology - physiopathology
Heart Ventricles - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Stroke Volume
Sweden
Tricuspid Valve - pathology - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Right
Young Adult
Abstract
Short-axis (SA) magnetic resonance (MR) images are commonly planned parallel to the left atrioventricular valve. This orientation leads to oblique slices of the right ventricle (RV) with subsequent difficulties in separating the RV from the right atrium in the SA images. The insertion points of the tricuspid valve (TV) in the myocardium can be clearly identified in the right ventricle long axis (RVLA) and four-chamber (4CH) views. The purpose of this study was to develop a method that transfers the position of the tricuspid plane, as seen in the RVLA and 4CH views, to the SA images to facilitate the separation of the RV from the atrium. This methodology, termed Dissociating the Right Atrium from the Ventricle Volume (DRAW), was applied in 20 patients for calculations of right ventricular stroke volume (RVSV). The RVSV using DRAW (RVSV(DRAW)) was compared to left ventricular stroke volumes (LVSV) obtained from flow measurements in the ascending aorta. The RVSV was also determined using the conventional method (RVSV(CONV)) where the stack of images from the SA views are summarized, and a visual decision is made of the most basal slice to be included in the RV. The mean difference between RVSV(DRAW) and LVSV was 0·1 ± 12·7 ml, while the mean difference between RVSV(CONV) and LVSV was 0·33 ± 14·3 ml. Both the intra- and interobserver variability were small using the DRAW methodology, 0·6 ± 3·5 and 1·7 ± 2·7 ml, respectively. In conclusion, the DRAW method can be used to facilitate the separation of the RV and the atrium.
PubMed ID
22152073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in the rhythmoinotropic dependence of the myocardium in rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis after beta1-adrenoreceptor blocking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95217
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2009 Mar;147(3):371-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Kondratyeva D S
Afanasyev S A
Ligacheva N A
Popov S V
Krivolapov S N
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cardiology, Tomsk Research Center, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russia. dina@cardio.tsu.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2009 Mar;147(3):371-4
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - pharmacology
Animals
Bisoprolol - pharmacology
Calcium - metabolism
Heart Ventricles - pathology
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Myocardium - metabolism - pathology
Myocytes, Cardiac - drug effects - metabolism
Papillary Muscles - drug effects - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Sarcoplasmic Reticulum - drug effects - metabolism
Abstract
The rhythmoinotropic dependence of the papillary muscles was studied in rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis after blocking of beta(1)-adrenoreceptors by concor (7 mg/kg daily). The development of postinfarction cardiosclerosis led to a reduction of the postextrasystolic potentiation and of potentiation induced by periods of rest. Preliminary blocking of beta(1)-adrenoreceptors stimulated the postextrasystolic contractions and contractions after periods of rest in the myocardium of rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis. These results suggest that blocking of beta(1)-adrenoreceptors promotes an improvement of calcium-accumulating function of the cardiomyocyte sarcoplasmatic reticulum in the myocardium of rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis.
PubMed ID
19529864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparative assessment of 2-dimensional echocardiography vs cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in measuring left ventricular mass in patients with and without end-stage renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119429
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):384-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Baruch D Jakubovic
Ron Wald
Marc B Goldstein
Howard Leong-Poi
Darren A Yuen
Jeffrey Perl
Joao A Lima
Jerome J Liu
Anish Kirpalani
Niki Dacouris
Rachel Wald
Kim A Connelly
Andrew T Yan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):384-90
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography - methods
Female
Heart Ventricles - pathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - ultrasonography
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - pathology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
While echocardiography (ECHO)-measured left ventricular mass (LVM) predicts adverse cardiovascular events that are common in hemodialysis (HD) recipients, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is now considered the reference standard for determination of LVM. This study aimed to evaluate concordance between LVM measurements across ECHO and CMR among chronic HD recipients and matched controls.
A single-centre, cross-sectional study of 41 chronic HD patients and 41 matched controls with normal kidney function was performed to compare LVM measurements and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) designation by ECHO and CMR.
In both groups, ECHO, compared with CMR, overestimated LVM. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated wider agreement limits in LVM measurements by ECHO and CMR in the chronic HD group (mean difference, 60.8 g; limits -23 g to 144.6 g) than in the group with normal renal function (mean difference, 51.4 g; limits -10.5 g to 113.3 g). LVH prevalence by ECHO and CMR in the chronic HD group was 37.5% and 22.5%, respectively, while 17.5% and 12.5% had LVH by ECHO and CMR, respectively, in the normal kidney function group. Intermodality agreement in the designation of LVH was modest in the chronic HD patients (? = 0.42, P = 0.005) but strong (? = 0.81, P
PubMed ID
23103220 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing impedance cardiography and echocardiography in the assessment of reduced left ventricular systolic function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115203
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2013;6:114
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Elzbieta Kaszuba
Sergej Scheel
Håkan Odeberg
Anders Halling
Author Affiliation
Blekinge Competence Centre, Wämö Centre, Karlskrona SE-371 81, Sweden. elzbieta.kaszuba@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2013;6:114
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiography, Impedance - methods
Echocardiography - methods
Electrodes
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - physiopathology
Heart Ventricles - pathology
Hemodynamics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Prognosis
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Systole
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnosis
Abstract
An early and accurate diagnosis of chronic heart failure is a big challenge for a general practitioner. Assessment of left ventricular function is essential for the diagnosis of heart failure and the prognosis. A gold standard for identifying left ventricular function is echocardiography. Echocardiography requires input from specialized care and has a limited access in Swedish primary health care. Impedance cardiography (ICG) is a noninvasive and low-cost method of examination. The survey technique is simple and ICG measurement can be performed by a general practitioner. ICG has been suggested for assessment of left ventricular function in patients with heart failure. We aimed to study the association between hemodynamic parameters measured by ICG and the value of ejection fraction as a determinant of reduced left ventricular systolic function in echocardiography.
A non-interventional, observational study conducted in the outpatients heart failure unit. Thirty-six patients with the diagnosis of chronic heart failure were simultaneously examined by echocardiography and ICG. Distribution of categorical variables was presented as numbers. Distribution of continuous variables was presented as a mean and 95% Confidence Interval. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare variables and show differences between the groups. A p-value of
Notes
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2009 May;108(5):1553-919372335
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2009 Jan;11(1):92-819147462
Cites: Heart Fail Clin. 2009 Jan;5(1):25-35, vi19026383
Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2008 Sep-Oct;14(5):261-518983289
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2008 Oct;10(10):933-8918826876
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2007 May;28(9):1128-3417459902
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Nurs. 2005 Fall;20(4):163-716276139
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2005 Feb;18(2 Pt 2):73S-81S15752936
Cites: Am J Crit Care. 2004 Nov;13(6):469-7915568652
Cites: J Intern Med. 1999 Sep;246(3):275-8410475995
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 1999 Jul;6(7):693-910433528
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1999 Feb;43(2):130-410027018
Cites: Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999 Jan;70(1):6-109895014
Cites: Clin Invest Med. 1992 Apr;15(2):103-121534291
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1989 Jul;10(7):647-562788575
Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2 Suppl 2):11-315073479
Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2003 Sep-Oct;9(5):241-5014564142
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2002 Jun;4(3):373-612034164
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2002 Apr 15;89(8):993-511950446
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2001 Jan;3(1):97-10311163742
Cites: Echocardiography. 2001 Jan;18(1):31-4111182781
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Feb 23;121(7):948-5420177011
PubMed ID
23531417 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of long and short axis quantification of left ventricular volume parameters by cardiovascular magnetic resonance, with ex-vivo validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132276
Source
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2011;13:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Helene Childs
Lucia Ma
Michael Ma
James Clarke
Myra Cocker
Jordin Green
Oliver Strohm
Matthias G Friedrich
Author Affiliation
Stephenson Cardiovascular MR Centre at Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, Departments of Cardiac Sciences and Radiology, University of Calgary, AB, Canada.
Source
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2011;13:40
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Clinical Competence
Dogs
Female
Heart Atria - pathology
Heart Ventricles - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Stroke Volume
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnosis - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy and evaluation time of quantifying left ventricular (LV), left atrial (LA) volume and LV mass using short axis (SAX) and long axis (LAX) methods when using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR).
We studied 12 explanted canine hearts and 46 patients referred for CMR (29 male, age 47 ± 18 years) in a clinical 1.5 T CMR system, using standard cine sequences. In standard short axis stacks of various slice thickness values in dogs and 8 mm slice thickness (gap 2 mm) in patients, we measured LV volumes using reference slices in a perpendicular, long axis orientation using certified software. Volumes and mass were also measured in six radial long axis (LAX) views.LV parameters were also assessed for intra- and inter-observer variability. In 24 patients, we also analyzed reproducibility and evaluation time of two very experienced (> 10 years of CMR reading) readers for SAX and LAX.
In the explanted dog hearts, there was excellent agreement between ex vivo data and LV mass and volume data as measured by all methods for both, LAX (r² = 0.98) and SAX (r² = 0.88 to 0.98). LA volumes, however, were underestimated by 13% using the LAX views. In patients, there was a good correlation between all three assessed methods (r² = 0.95 for all). In experienced clinical readers, left-ventricular volumes and ejection fraction as measured in LAX views showed a better inter-observer reproducibility and a 27% shorter evaluation time.
When compared to an ex vivo standard, both, short axis and long axis techniques are highly accurate for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and mass. In clinical settings, however, the long axis approach may be more reproducible and more time-efficient. Therefore, the rotational long axis approach is a viable alternative for the clinical assessment of cardiac volumes, function and mass.
Notes
Cites: MAGMA. 2000 Nov;11(1-2):16-911186974
Cites: J Magn Reson Imaging. 2001 Dec;14(6):685-9211747024
Cites: Radiology. 2004 Feb;230(2):389-9514699186
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1986 Jul;8(1):113-73711507
Cites: Radiology. 1988 Nov;169(2):495-82971985
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Jun 8;121(22):2462-50820479157
Cites: Magn Reson Med. 1997 May;37(5):683-929126942
Cites: Radiology. 2005 Jul;236(1):57-6415955850
Cites: J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2005;7(5):775-8216353438
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Oct 3;48(7):1475-9717010819
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2007 Jul 15;100(2):211-617631072
Cites: Radiology. 1993 Aug;188(2):371-68327680
PubMed ID
21834992 View in PubMed
Less detail

34 records – page 1 of 4.