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233 records – page 1 of 24.

3-year follow-up of patients randomised in the metoprolol in dilated cardiomyopathy trial. The Metoprolol in Dilated Cardiomyopathy (MDC) Trial Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10861
Source
Lancet. 1998 Apr 18;351(9110):1180-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-1998
Source
Angiol Sosud Khir. 2016;22(2):13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
M Sh Khubutiya
Source
Angiol Sosud Khir. 2016;22(2):13
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Heart Transplantation - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Russia
PubMed ID
27487588 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activation of alloreactive natural killer cells is resistant to cyclosporine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57609
Source
Transplantation. 1997 Apr 27;63(8):1138-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1997
Author
E. Petersson
Z. Qi
H. Ekberg
O. Ostraat
M. Dohlsten
G. Hedlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Tumor Immunology, The Wallenberg Laboratory, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Transplantation. 1997 Apr 27;63(8):1138-44
Date
Apr-27-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, CD3 - analysis
Cyclosporine - pharmacology
Drug Resistance - immunology
Female
Graft Survival - drug effects
Heart Transplantation - immunology
Interleukin-2 - pharmacology
Killer Cells - immunology
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Male
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred WF
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic - drug effects - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) with alloreactivity were induced when Wistar Furth (WF; RT1u) rats were immunized with allogeneic Brown Norway (BN; RT1n) cells. In contrast, when BN rats were immunized with WF cells, the allospecific response was confined to alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells, and no CTL activity was observed. In this study, the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on the activation of alloreactive NK cells in vivo was analyzed. METHODS: Distinct peritoneal effector cells from rats immunized with allogenic cells with or without concomitant CsA and/or interleukin (IL) 2 treatment were tested for specific cytolytic activity. Furthermore, the presumptive role of NK cells in rejection immunity was addressed in a cardiac graft model. RESULTS: The results showed that doses of CsA that completely inhibited the activation of alloreactive CTL, only marginally affected the activation of alloreactive NK cells. We also showed that CsA treatment failed to prolong graft survival in BN recipients of WF hearts. Treatment of BN rats with CsA/IL-2 during immunization with allogeneic WF cells resulted in concomitant induction of alloreactive NK cells and alloreactive CTL. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that CsA failed to suppress the activation of alloreactive NK cells. Consequently, the cardiac graft survival in the donor-recipient combination known to activate alloreactive NK cells was not significantly prolonged by CsA treatment, emphasizing the involvement of NK cells as effectors in organ rejection. Furthermore, the parallel emergence of alloreactive NK cells and CTL only in the presence of CsA/IL-2 indicated that CsA interfered with alloreactive NK cell-associated suppression of CTL activated by allogeneic tissue.
PubMed ID
9133476 View in PubMed
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The Alberta adult heart transplant experience: survival based on age, gender, etiology, ischemic times, bridge to transplant, and bicaval technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182882
Source
Transplant Proc. 2003 Nov;35(7):2471-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003

Allogeneic heart transplantation activates alloreactive NK cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57612
Source
Cell Immunol. 1997 Jan 10;175(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1997
Author
E. Petersson
O. Ostraat
H. Ekberg
J. Hansson
M. Simanaitis
T. Brodin
M. Dohlsten
G. Hedlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Tumor Immunology, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Cell Immunol. 1997 Jan 10;175(1):25-32
Date
Jan-10-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, CD5 - metabolism
Cell Line
Comparative Study
Female
Graft Rejection - etiology - immunology - pathology
Heart Transplantation - adverse effects - immunology - pathology
Isoantigens
Killer Cells, Natural - immunology - pathology
Lymphocyte Activation
Male
Mice
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Rats, Inbred WF
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic - immunology
Transplantation, Homologous
Abstract
The ability of natural killer (NK) cells to recognize and reject transplants has so far been shown in hematopoietic grafts only. This study was designed to ascertain whether NK cells may also be involved in the rejection of transplanted organs. In most rat strain combinations, immunization with allogeneic cells induces a T cell response with cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activation. We have previously found one exception to this. In contrast to Wistar Furth rats (WF, RT1u), which manifest allospecific CTL activation in response to immunization with Brown Norway (BN, RT1n) cells, BN rats immunized with repeated intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of allogeneic WF spleen cells manifest activation of alloreactive NK effector cells. The alloreactive NK cells were of the TCR-, CD3-, CD8+, and NKR-P1 intermediate phenotype and killed target cells with alloselectivity. In this study we used a heart transplantation model to study the rejection response of BN rats receiving WF grafts. NK cell infiltration was greater in WF hearts transplanted to BN recipients than in BN hearts transplanted to WF recipients. Furthermore, the extent of T cell infiltration was less in BN recipients. In WF rats transplanted with allogeneic BN hearts, CTL were activated in response to i.p. challenge with allogeneic BN cells, whereas BN rats transplanted with allogeneic WF hearts and i.p. challenged with allogeneic WF cells, manifested activation of alloreactive NK cells but no measurable activation of classic CTL. The alloreactive NK cells killed their allogeneic targets with specificity and with potency comparable to that of CTL. Furthermore, WF grafts were rejected in BN recipients as efficiently as were BN grafts in WF recipients. These results not only show cardiac allografts to be able to activate alloreactive NK cells, but also suggest that NK cells may be involved in the rejection of solid organ transplants and function as classic CTL in certain donor-recipient combinations.
PubMed ID
9015185 View in PubMed
Less detail

alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone protects the allograft in experimental heart transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51606
Source
Transplantation. 2002 Dec 27;74(12):1678-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-27-2002
Author
Stefano Gatti
Gualtiero Colombo
Roberto Buffa
Flavia Turcatti
Letizia Garofalo
Nadia Carboni
Luca Ferla
Luigi R Fassati
James M Lipton
Anna Catania
Author Affiliation
Division of Liver Transplantation, Ospedale Maggiore di Milano IRCCS, Milano, Italy.
Source
Transplantation. 2002 Dec 27;74(12):1678-84
Date
Dec-27-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Endothelin-1 - genetics
Gene Expression - drug effects
Graft Rejection - drug therapy - immunology - pathology
Graft Survival - drug effects - immunology
Heart Transplantation
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 - genetics
Interferon Type II - genetics
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 - genetics
Nitrates - blood
Nitric Oxide - blood
Nitric Oxide Synthase - genetics
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Nitrites - blood
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis - genetics
RANTES - genetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Transforming Growth Factor beta - genetics
Transplantation, Homologous
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - genetics
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 - genetics
alpha-MSH - pharmacology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: With the increasing need for organ transplantation and the use of "marginal" organs, novel approaches are sought to increase the efficiency and survival of transplanted tissue. We tested the idea that treatment with the anti-inflammatory peptide, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), an endogenous hormone that does not cause marked immunosuppression but does reduce reperfusion injury, may protect allografts and prolong their survival. METHODS: Donor cardiac grafts (Brown Norway) were transplanted heterotopically into the abdomen of recipient (Lewis) rats. Treatments consisted of intraperitoneal injections of Nle DPhe -alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH) or saline from the time of transplantation until sacrifice or spontaneous rejection. Allografts were removed on day 1, day 4, or at the time of rejection and examined for histopathology and expression of molecules prominent in reperfusion injury, transplant rejection, and apoptosis. RESULTS: NDP-alpha-MSH treatment caused a significant increase in allograft survival and a marked decrease in leukocyte infiltration. Expression of molecules such as endothelin 1, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, which are involved in allograft rejection, was significantly inhibited in NDP-alpha-MSH-treated rats. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that protection of the allograft from early injury with alpha-MSH can postpone rejection. Addition of this early protection with the peptide to usual treatment with immunosuppressive agents may, therefore, improve success of organ transplants.
PubMed ID
12499879 View in PubMed
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Anaesthesia for non-cardiac surgery in heart-transplanted patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220226
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1993 Oct;40(10):981-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
D C Cheng
D D Ong
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1993 Oct;40(10):981-6
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, General - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Inhalation - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, Intravenous - statistics & numerical data
Blood Pressure - physiology
Diazepam - administration & dosage
Emergencies - epidemiology
Female
Fentanyl - administration & dosage
Heart Rate - physiology
Heart Transplantation
Humans
Isoflurane - administration & dosage
Male
Midazolam - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Neuroleptanalgesia - statistics & numerical data
Nitrous Oxide - administration & dosage
Ontario - epidemiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Surgical Procedures, Elective - statistics & numerical data
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Thiopental - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This review documents the anaesthetic management, haemodynamic function and outcome in 18 of 86 heart-transplanted recipients, who returned for 32 non-cardiac surgical procedures at the Toronto Hospital from 1985 to 1990. General anaesthesia was administered in eight of the 27 elective operations and four of the five emergency operations. Induction medications included thiopentone (2-4 mg.kg-1), fentanyl (1-7 micrograms.kg-1) and succinylcholine (1-1.5 mg.kg-1). Anaesthesia was maintained with a combination of oxygen/nitrous oxide and isoflurane or enflurane. Muscle relaxation was maintained with vecuronium or pancuronium. No delayed awakening or unplanned postoperative ventilation was observed. Neurolept-anaesthesia was administered to 63.0% and 20.0% of the elective and emergency operations, respectively. The anaesthetics included fentanyl (25-100 micrograms) and midazolam (0.5-1.5 mg) or diazemuls (2.5-5.0 mg). Spinal anaesthesia (75 mg lidocaine) was administered to only two of the 27 elective operations. No important haemodynamic changes were observed in any anaesthetic group, but lower systolic BP was found after induction and during maintenance periods in the patients who received general anaesthesia than in those who received neurolept-anaesthesia. However, no anaesthesia-related morbidity or mortality was noted. This suggests that general, neurolept- and spinal anaesthesia do not affect haemodynamic function or postoperative outcome in heart-transplanted recipients undergoing subsequent non-cardiac surgery.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1994 Jul;41(7):655-68087917
PubMed ID
8222040 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of deaths after heart transplantation: the University of Ottawa Heart Institute experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220432
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 1993 Sep-Oct;12(5):790-801
Publication Type
Article
Author
V M Walley
R G Masters
S A Boone
A L Wolfsohn
R A Davies
P J Hendry
W J Keon
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 1993 Sep-Oct;12(5):790-801
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anastomosis, Surgical - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Assisted Circulation - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Forecasting
Heart Diseases - pathology - physiopathology
Heart Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality - pathology
Heart, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Reoperation
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study reviews the clinical outcome of the 132 orthotopic heart transplantations performed at our institute from 1984 through 1991 and focuses on the pathology of those patients who died. The study comprised 124 adults (mean age, 45.6 +/- 0.9 years) and eight children. Twenty-six adult and one pediatric deaths occurred. Operative mortality (within 30 days) was 10.6%, with 84.8% of patients surviving to discharge. Actuarial probabilities of survival at 1 and 5 years were 84% +/- 3% and 71% +/- 6%, respectively. Of the 27 deaths, six (22.2%) occurred in the operating room (from hemorrhage, graft failure, and hyperacute rejection); 14 (51.9%) occurred in-hospital after surgery (from sepsis, rejection, cytomegalovirus disease, or myocardial infarct), and seven (25.9%) occurred after discharge (from rejection and/or recurrent coronary artery disease). Two groups of patients were at higher risk: patients in cardiogenic shock requiring pretransplantation mechanical support, with in-hospital mortality of 39.1%; and patients with previous valve replacement who were taking oral anticoagulants, with intraoperative mortality of 50.0%. Pathologic examination revealed occasional instances of unsuspected coronary artery disease in the donor hearts with more than 50% stenoses of the left anterior descending coronary arteries in three of 21 (14.3%) of cases. Complications of the transplantation or related therapeutic procedures were common among those who died. The complications ranged from functionally insignificant anatomic curiosities to life-threatening problems. These complications are tabulated and shown.
PubMed ID
8241216 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anesthetic management for cardiac transplantation in North America--1986 survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234662
Source
J Cardiothorac Anesth. 1987 Oct;1(5):429-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1987
Author
F A Hensley
D E Martin
D R Larach
M E Romanoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey 17033.
Source
J Cardiothorac Anesth. 1987 Oct;1(5):429-37
Date
Oct-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, General - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiopulmonary Bypass - statistics & numerical data
Heart Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Preanesthetic Medication - statistics & numerical data
Preoperative Care - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Cardiac transplantation has become an established part of the therapy of end-stage heart disease. The number of cardiac transplants performed, as well as the number of centers performing them, has increased dramatically in the past 2 years. A paucity of literature on the anesthetic management of patients undergoing cardiac transplantation prompted this survey of 46 United States and Canadian institutions. The report summarizes the perioperative anesthetic management of a total of 1,273 transplant recipients in 34 institutions. Generally, similar anesthetic techniques and agents were used. One notable exception was the percentage of institutions using perioperative pulmonary artery catheter monitoring. As determined from this survey, right ventricular failure remains the leading cause of inability to terminate cardiopulmonary bypass in this patient population. Further, in surveyed institutions, cardiac transplantation expends more physician as well as hospital resources per patient than coronary artery bypass surgery.
PubMed ID
2979112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of the Seattle heart failure model in patients >80 years of age enrolled in a tertiary care heart failure clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121306
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2012 Dec 1;110(11):1663-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2012
Author
Hanane Benbarkat
Karima Addetia
Mark J Eisenberg
Richard Sheppard
Kristian B Filion
Caroline Michel
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2012 Dec 1;110(11):1663-6
Date
Dec-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - therapy
Heart Transplantation
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Tertiary Care Centers
Time Factors
Abstract
The Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) is 1 of the most widely used tools to predict survival in patients with heart failure. However, it does not accommodate very elderly patients. We decided to assess the applicability of the SHFM in patients >80 years old enrolled in a tertiary care heart failure clinic. We evaluated the difference between observed survival and mean life expectancy as predicted by the SHFM on 261 patients >80 years old enrolled in a heart failure clinic at the Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada from January 2002 through March 2010. Average age of the patient population was 85 ± 4 years (range 80 to 105). Sixty-two percent of the population consisted of men, 63% had ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), and average ejection fraction was 36 ± 18%. Median observed survival was 1.91 years (interquartile range 0.68 to 5.53) for the total population (n = 261). The SHFM (predicted median survival 6.7 years, interquartile range 3.8 to 11.2) overestimated life expectancy by an average of 4.79 years. For patients with ICM (n = 164) versus non-ICM (n = 97), the score overestimated survival by 4.29 versus 5.69 years, respectively. In conclusion, the SHFM overestimates life expectancy in elderly patients followed in a tertiary care heart failure clinic. Further studies are needed to more accurately estimate prognosis in this patient population.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Cardiol. 2013 Apr 15;111(8):123523558002
PubMed ID
22920927 View in PubMed
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233 records – page 1 of 24.