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Abdominal aortic embolization of a Figulla atrial septum occluder device, at the level of the celiac axis, after an atrial septal defect closure: hybrid attempt.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98185
Source
Vascular. 2010 Jan-Feb;18(1):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Kh Jahrome
Peter R Stella
Vanessa J Leijdekkers
Siyrous Hoseyni Guyomi
Frans L Moll
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. a.k.jahrome@umcutrecht.nl
Source
Vascular. 2010 Jan-Feb;18(1):59-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aorta, Abdominal - radiography - surgery
Aortic Diseases - etiology - radiography - therapy
Aortography - methods
Catheterization, Peripheral
Device Removal
Embolism - etiology - radiography - surgery - therapy
Female
Foreign-Body Migration - etiology - radiography - surgery - therapy
Heart Catheterization - adverse effects - instrumentation
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - therapy
Humans
Septal Occluder Device
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures
Abstract
A 41-year-old woman was treated with a Figulla (Occlutec, Helsingborg, Sweden) atrial septum occluder device with no intraprocedural complications. Five months later, dislocation of the device in the abdominal aorta was detected. The occluder device was located at the level of the celiac axis, nearly obstructing the entire aorta. Owing to total incorporation of the device, endoluminal retrieval was not possible. Through a medial rotation approach, the device was safely removed. This is a rare complication after endoluminal closure of an atrial septum defect. The retrieval possibilities are discussed.
PubMed ID
20122364 View in PubMed
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Availability of percutaneous closure for an adult population with interatrial shunts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53557
Source
Cardiology. 2003;99(2):85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Magnus Johansson
Björn Söderberg
Peter Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Ostra University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. magnus.c.johansson@vgregion.se
Source
Cardiology. 2003;99(2):85-9
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Balloon Occlusion
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - utilization
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Postoperative Complications - etiology - ultrasonography
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To report the availability of percutaneous closure for an adult population with interatrial septal defects. METHODS: Observational study with 66 consecutive patients referred to a tertiary center for evaluation of the possibility of percutaneous closure. The patients were selected initially after review of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and finally after heart catheterization. RESULTS: Out of 66 patients, 50 were selected after the review of TEE and 38 of them were selected after catheterization; all of the 38 were effectively closed. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous closure is possible and can be carried out safely in a majority of the adult population with interatrial shunts.
PubMed ID
12711883 View in PubMed
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Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185106
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2003 May;(47):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
David Hailey
Leigh-Ann Topfer
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2003 May;(47):1-6
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiac Catheterization - adverse effects - economics - instrumentation - methods
Costs and Cost Analysis
Device Approval
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - therapy
Humans
Treatment Outcome
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
Until recently, surgical repair was the standard treatment for an ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD), a common congenital heart defect. Closing ASDs using a device inserted via a catheter now offers another option for some patients. Limited comparative data indicate that newer approaches to transcatheter repair have a higher failure rate than that for surgery, but short-term complication rates are lower. Evidence from long-term follow-up of patients with device closure of ASDs is not yet available. Equipment and procedure costs may be higher for transcatheter closure than for surgery, but overall costs may be reduced through avoiding intensive care unit costs and through shorter hospital stays.
PubMed ID
12785349 View in PubMed
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