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373 records – page 1 of 38.

Abnormalities in beat to beat complexity of heart rate dynamics in patients with a previous myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54616
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996 Oct;28(4):1005-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
T H Mäkikallio
T. Seppänen
M. Niemelä
K E Airaksinen
M. Tulppo
H V Huikuri
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Oulu University, Finland.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996 Oct;28(4):1005-11
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Entropy
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this research was to study possible abnormalities in the beat to beat complexity of heart rate dynamics in patients with a previous myocardial infarction. BACKGROUND: Analysis of approximate entropy of time series data provides information on the complexity of both deterministic and random processes. It has been proposed that regularity or loss of complexity of RR interval dynamics may be related to pathologic states, but this hypothesis has not been well tested in cardiovascular disorders. METHODS: Approximate entropy and conventional time and frequency domain measures of RR interval variability were compared between 40 healthy subjects with no evidence of heart disease and 40 patients with coronary artery disease and a previous Q wave myocardial infarction. The groups were matched with respect to age, and cardiac medication was discontinued in the patients with coronary artery disease before the 24-h electrocardiographic recordings. RESULTS: Approximate entropy was significantly higher in the postinfarction patients (1.21 +/- 0.18 [mean +/- SD]) than in the healthy subjects (1.05 +/- 0.11, p
PubMed ID
8837582 View in PubMed
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The Actiheart in adolescents: a doubly labelled water validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118532
Source
Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2012 Nov;24(4):589-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nerissa Campbell
Harry Prapavessis
Casey Gray
Erin McGowan
Elaine Rush
Ralph Maddison
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2012 Nov;24(4):589-602
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise Test - instrumentation - methods
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation
Motor Activity - physiology
Ontario
Water - diagnostic use
Abstract
This study investigated the validity of the Actiheart device for estimating free-living physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in adolescents.
Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured in eighteen Canadian adolescents, aged 15-18 years, by DLW. Physical activity energy expenditure was calculated as 0.9 X TEE minus resting energy expenditure, assuming 10% for the thermic effect of feeding. Participants wore the chest mounted Actiheart device which records simultaneously minute-by-minute acceleration (ACC) and heart rate (HR). Using both children and adult branched equation modeling, derived from laboratory-based activity, PAEE was estimated from the ACC and HR data. Linear regression analyses examined the association between PAEE derived from the Actiheart and DLW method where DLW PAEE served as the dependent variable. Measurement of agreement between the two methods was analyzed using the Bland-Altman procedure.
A nonsignificant association was found between the children derived Actiheart and DLW PAEE values (R = .23, R(2) = .05, p = .36); whereas a significant association was found between the adult derived Actiheart and DLW PAEE values (R = .53, R(2) = .29, p
PubMed ID
23196766 View in PubMed
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Activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems and baseline arterial blood pressure in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91971
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Aftanas L I
Sidorova P V
Pavlov S V
Makhnev V P
Korenek V V
Reva N V
Amstislavskaya T G
Author Affiliation
Psychophysiology Laboratory, State Research Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 4 Timakov Street, 630117, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Electromyography
Emotions - physiology
Galvanic Skin Response - physiology
Heart Rate - physiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Male
Motivation
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Oculomotor Muscles - physiology
Photic Stimulation
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Smoking - physiopathology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present work was to identify possible associations between individual balances in the activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems using a method based on emotional modulation of the startle reaction (EMSR) by motivationally significant emotionally positive and negative contextual visual stimuli and measures of cardiovascular system activity. Studies were performed using healthy males (mean age 30.29 +/- 9.8 years) with normal and first-episode excessive increases in arterial blood pressure (systolic blood pressure to greater than 140 mmHg, diastolic to greater than 90 mmHg). Cluster analysis of EMSR data identified groups of individuals with different activity profiles for the positive and negative reinforcement systems. Groups of subjects with changes in the balance of activity towards a lower level of positive reinforcement system activity (smaller startle reflexes to positive contextual stimuli) or a higher level of negative reinforcement system activity (larger startle reactions to threatening contextual stimuli) showed significantly greater baseline SBP and DBP. The possible mechanisms of the modulatory influences of the balance of system activities on autonomic vascular regulatory processes are discussed.
PubMed ID
18802770 View in PubMed
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Activity pattern and energy expenditure due to physical activity before and during pregnancy in healthy Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63107
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Marie Lof
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoping, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exertion - physiology
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Running - physiology
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Human pregnancy is associated with increased requirements for dietary energy and this increase may be partly offset by reductions in physical activity during gestation. Studies in well-nourished women have shown that the physical activity level (PAL), obtained as the total energy expenditure (TEE) divided by the BMR, decreases in late pregnancy. However, it is not known if this decrease is really caused by reductions in physical activity or if it is the result of decreases in energy expenditure/BMR (the so-called metabolic equivalent, MET) for many activities in late pregnancy. In the present study activity pattern, TEE and BMR were assessed in twenty-three healthy Swedish women before pregnancy as well as in gestational weeks 14 and 32. Activity pattern was assessed using a questionnaire and heart rate recording. TEE was assessed using the doubly labelled water method and BMR was measured by means of indirect calorimetry. When compared to the pre-pregnant value, there was little change in the PAL in gestational week 14 but it was significantly reduced in gestational week 32. Results obtained by means of the questionnaire and by heart rate recording showed that the activity pattern was largely unaffected by pregnancy. The findings support the following conclusion: in a population of well-nourished women where the activity pattern is maintained during pregnancy, the increase in BMR represents approximately the main part of the pregnancy-induced increase in TEE, at least until gestational week 32.
PubMed ID
16469145 View in PubMed
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Activity profile and physiological response to football training for untrained males and females, elderly and youngsters: influence of the number of players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100640
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
M B Randers
L. Nybo
J. Petersen
J J Nielsen
L. Christiansen
M. Bendiksen
J. Brito
J. Bangsbo
P. Krustrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. pkrustrup@ifi.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Soccer - physiology
Time and Motion Studies
Videotape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study examined the activity profile, heart rate and metabolic response of small-sided football games for untrained males (UM, n=26) and females (UF, n=21) and investigated the influence of the number of players (UM: 1v1, 3v3, 7v7; UF: 2v2, 4v4 and 7v7). Moreover, heart rate response to small-sided games was studied for children aged 9 and 12 years (C9+C12, n=75), as well as homeless (HM, n=15), middle-aged (MM, n=9) and elderly (EM, n=11) men. During 7v7, muscle glycogen decreased more for UM than UF (28 +/- 6 vs 11 +/- 5%; P90% of HR(max) ranged from 147 +/- 4 (EM) to 162 +/- 2 (UM) b.p.m. and 10.8 +/- 1.5 (UF) to 47.8 +/- 5.8% (EM). Time >90% of HR(max) (UM: 16-17%; UF: 8-13%) and time spent with high speed running (4.1-5.1%) was similar for training with 2-14 players, but more high-intensity runs were performed with few players (UM 1v1: 140 +/- 17; UM 7v7: 97 +/- 5; P
PubMed ID
20149143 View in PubMed
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Acute effects on heart rate variability when exposed to hand transmitted vibration and noise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163243
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Nov;81(2):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Bodil Björ
Lage Burström
Marcus Karlsson
Tohr Nilsson
Ulf Näslund
Urban Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. bodil.bjor@envmed.umu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Nov;81(2):193-9
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Electrocardiography
Female
Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome - physiopathology
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Monitoring, Physiologic
Noise - adverse effects
Sweden
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
This study investigates possible acute effects on heart rate variability (HRV) when people are exposed to hand transmitted vibration and noise individually and simultaneously.
Ten male and 10 female subjects were recruited by advertisement. Subjects completed a questionnaire concerning their work environment, general health, medication, hearing, and physical activity level. The test started with the subject resting for 15 min while sitting down. After resting, they were exposed to one of four exposure conditions: (1) only vibration; (2) only noise; (3) both noise and vibration; or (4) a control condition of exposure to the static load only. All four exposures lasted 15 min and the resting time between the exposures was 30 min. A continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) signal was recorded and the following HRV parameters were calculated: total spectral power (P(TOT)); the spectral power of the very low frequency component (P(VLF)); the low frequency component (P(LF)); the high frequency component (P(HF)); and the ratio LF/HF.
Exposure to only vibration resulted in a lower P(TOT) compared to static load, whereas exposure to only noise resulted in a higher P(TOT). The mean values of P(TOT), P(VLF), P(LF), and P(HF) were lowest during exposure to vibration and simultaneous exposure to vibration and noise.
Exposure to vibration and/or noise acutely affects HRV compared to standing without these exposures. Being exposed to vibration only and being exposed to noise only seem to generate opposite effects. Compared to no exposure, P(TOT) was reduced during vibration exposure and increased during noise exposure.
PubMed ID
17541625 View in PubMed
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Adrenal medullary overactivity in lean, borderline hypertensive young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9447
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2004 Jul;17(7):611-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Henrik M Reims
Eigil Fossum
Aud Høieggen
Andreas Moan
Ivar Eide
Sverre E Kjeldsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2004 Jul;17(7):611-8
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Gland Diseases - blood - physiopathology
Adrenal Medulla - metabolism - physiopathology
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - blood - physiopathology
Insulin - metabolism
Male
Norepinephrine - blood
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - blood - physiopathology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rest
Statistics
Stress, Psychological - blood
Thinness - blood - physiopathology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There may be a link among stress, adrenal medullary activation, and the development of hypertension. Obesity is characterized by sympathetic activation and predisposes to hypertension, but may be associated with low or normal adrenal medullary activity. We hypothesized that plasma epinephrine (E) levels and adrenal medullary responsiveness to mental stress are lower in overweight than in lean borderline hypertensive subjects. METHODS: We compared groups of lean (n = 62) and overweight (n = 29) borderline hypertensive young men as well as lean (n = 36) and overweight (n = 7) normotensive young men from the same population. Plasma catecholamines and heart rate (HR) were measured at rest during a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp and during mental arithmetic-induced stress. RESULTS: Plasma norepinephrine (NE) and E, HR, and responses to stress were increased in borderline hypertensive subjects. Our results showed that NE was increased only in lean borderline hypertensive subjects at rest, but in overweight subjects as well during stress, with DeltaNE being similar in lean and overweight subjects. We found that E was higher in lean than in overweight borderline hypertensive subjects at rest and during stress (both P
PubMed ID
15233980 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness influences the response of maximal oxygen uptake and lactate threshold in acute hypobaric hypoxia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50162
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
P. Koistinen
T. Takala
V. Martikkala
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Health Centre Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):78-81
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aerobiosis
Altitude
Anaerobic Threshold - physiology
Anoxia - blood - physiopathology
Exercise Test
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Hockey - physiology
Humans
Lactates - blood
Male
Oxygen - blood
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Respiration - physiology
Skiing - physiology
Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio
Abstract
We studied 12 highly trained athletes, 6 male ice-hockey players and 6 cross-country skiers (2 females, 4 males). All of them participated in a maximal electrically braked bicycle ergometer test in a hypobaric chamber at the simulated altitude of 3000m (520 mmHg) and in normobaric conditions two days apart in random order. The maximal oxygen uptake was 57.4 +/- 7.1 (SD) ml/kg/min in normobaria (VO2maxnorm) and 46.6 +/- 4.9 (SD) ml/kg/min in hypobaric hypoxia (VO2maxhyp). The decrease in maximal oxygen uptake (delta VO2max) at the simulated altitude of 3000m correlated significantly (p
PubMed ID
7751080 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness in young Norwegian men: a comparison between 1980 and 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49581
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005 Oct;15(5):298-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
S M Dyrstad
A. Aandstad
J. Hallén
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, Oslo, Norway. sindre.drystad@nih.no
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005 Oct;15(5):298-303
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Exercise Test
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Norway
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - physiopathology
Vocational Education
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in 18-19-year-old Norwegian men from 1980 to 1985 and 2002. In addition, we investigated the relationship between VO2max and education and smoking habits in the sample from 2002. From 1980 to 1985, VO2max was predicted using the Astrand-Rhyming bicycle test for 183 610 eighteen-year-old Norwegian men (91% of the male Norwegian population in this age group). In 2002, the same test was performed on a representative sample of the same age population (N=1028). VO2max (mL x kg(-1)x min(-1)), decreased by 8%, body weight increased by 7% and body mass index (BMI) increased by 6% over the approximately 20-year period (P
PubMed ID
16181253 View in PubMed
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373 records – page 1 of 38.