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Acetate-induced changes in cardiac energy metabolism and hemodynamics in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12462
Source
Basic Res Cardiol. 1988 Jul-Aug;83(4):431-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
K T Kiviluoma
M. Karhunen
T. Lapinlampi
K J Peuhkurinen
I E Hassinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Basic Res Cardiol. 1988 Jul-Aug;83(4):431-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetic Acid
Acetic Acids - pharmacology
Adenosine - metabolism
Animals
Cardiac Output - drug effects
Epinephrine - blood
Heart - drug effects - physiology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes
In Vitro
Myocardium - metabolism
Oxygen Consumption - drug effects
Phosphorylation
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Time Factors
Abstract
The hemodynamic and metabolic effects of acetate were studied in rats in vivo and in the isolated perfused heart. Hemodynamic parameters, myocardial phosphagens, inorganic phosphate, and adenosine were measured in vivo. Acetate uptake, coronary flow, O2 consumption, parameters of the cellular energy state, and hypoxanthine compounds and their washout were measured in heart perfusion experiments. Heart rate (HR), cardiac output, and the peak derivative of the left ventricular pressure rise (dP/dtmax) increased significantly during acetate infusion in vivo, but mean arterial pressure, systolic arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance decreased. Heart muscle ATP concentrations decreased after 7 min of acetate infusion. In vivo cardiac work load (HR.(peak left ventricular pressure] showed a positive correlation with tissue adenosine concentration and a negative correlation with phosphorylation potential. Acetate uptake in the perfused hearts was about 2.5 mumol/min per gram wet weight. Acetate perfusion increased O2 consumption and coronary flow concomitantly with a decrease in tissue ATP concentration. Tissue AMP and perfusate effluent adenosine concentration and adenosine output increased significantly, perfusate adenosine showing a non-linear positive correlation with coronary flow. The results demonstrate that acetate induces considerable changes in hemodynamics and metabolism in the heart.
PubMed ID
3190660 View in PubMed
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[Achievement of goal resting heart rate in patients with stable angina and hypertension at the background of therapy with -adrenoblockers in real clinical practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106918
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(7):13-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Zh D Kobalava
G K Kiiakbaev
Iu V Khomitskaia
A A Shavarov
Author Affiliation
Russian University of Peoples Friendship, ul. Mikluho-Maklaya, 6,117198 Moscow, Russia.
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(7):13-23
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Aged
Angina, Stable - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Demography
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Monitoring
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
ß-Adrenoblockers improve quality of life and in a number of cases life prognosis in patients with stable angina (SA). Dose of -adrenoblockers is considered optimal if at the background of treatment resting heart rate (rHR) is persistently decreased down to 55-60 bpm. But according to data of international registries rate of achievement of target rHR (trHR) in real clinical practice does not exceed 22%. Aim of this study was to determine what portion of patients with SA and arterial hypertension (AH) achieves trHR at the background of therapy with -adrenoblockers in routine practice in this country. Twenty centers in 6 towns in Russian Federation recruited 399 patients (mean age 64+/-10 years) with class I-III angina and concomitant primary AH. These patients for at least 2 months received any -adrenoblocker and did not change its dose during 4 weeks before inclusion into the program. Portion of patients with trHR was 15.5%. There were no significant differences between average daily doses of most frequently used -adrenoblockers (metoprolol, bisoprolol, carvediolol) in groups of patients who achieved and did not achieve trHR. Quality of life of patients who achieved was comparable with that of those who did not achieve trHR. Attainment of trHR was associated with significant decrease of short acting requirement nitrates. There was a significant direct correlation between attainment of trHR and target arterial pressure.
PubMed ID
24087955 View in PubMed
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AchievemenT of target resting HEart rate on beta-blockers in patients with stable angiNA and hypertension (ATHENA) in routine clinical practice in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257829
Source
Curr Med Res Opin. 2014 May;30(5):805-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Zhanna Kobalava
Yunona Khomitskaya
Gayrat Kiyakbaev
Author Affiliation
Peoples' Friendship University of Russia , Moscow , Russian Federation.
Source
Curr Med Res Opin. 2014 May;30(5):805-11
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Stable - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The primary objective of this study was to establish the proportion of patients with stable angina and arterial hypertension on beta-blocker (BB) treatment reaching target resting heart rates (RHR) of 55-60 beats per min in clinical cardiology and general practice in Russia. Secondary objectives included the association between achievement of target RHR and mean BB doses, Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) scores and achievement of target blood pressure (BP) levels (systolic/diastolic BP
Notes
Comment In: Curr Med Res Opin. 2014 Sep;30(9):175724824966
PubMed ID
24400847 View in PubMed
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Acute administration of a single dose of valsartan improves left ventricular functions: a pilot study to assess the role of tissue velocity echocardiography in patients with systemic arterial hypertension in the TVE-valsartan study I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80206
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Govind Satish C
Brodin Lars-Ake
Nowak Jacek
Ramesh S S
Saha Samir K
Author Affiliation
BMJ Heart Center, Department of Non-invasive Cardiology, Bangalore, India.
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Pilot Projects
Research Design
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Sweden
Tetrazoles - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Valine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The advent of colour-coded tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE) has now made it possible to quantify left ventricular (LV) functions in patients with systemic arterial hypertension (HTN). Hypothesis In this project, we have studied the cardiac effects of a single dose of orally administered valsartan in patients with known HTN. METHODS: Fifty-five patients with HTN with a mean age of 56 +/- 10 years were given an early morning dose of 80 mg valsartan withholding regular antihypertensive medications on the day of investigation. TVE images, acquired on VIVID systems were digitized for postprocessing of longitudinal and radial peak systolic velocities, strain rate, and systolic and diastolic time intervals before (pre) and 5 h after (post) administration of the drug. RESULTS: Blood pressure (mmHg) pre and post, respectively, were 147 +/- 15 versus 137 +/- 14 systolic and 90 +/- 7 versus 86 +/- 7 diastolic (all P
PubMed ID
17042901 View in PubMed
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The acute dose-related effects of ethanol on right ventricular function in anesthetized dogs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11893
Source
Alcohol. 1992 Mar-Apr;9(2):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Kettunen
J. Timisjärvi
P. Saukko
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Alcohol. 1992 Mar-Apr;9(2):149-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cardiac Output - drug effects
Dogs
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Pulmonary Artery - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Right - drug effects
Abstract
The acute dose-related effects of small to moderate doses of ethanol on right ventricular functioning were studied on 18 anesthetized, artificially ventilated dogs in 39 sessions. Diluted ethanol (from 25-37.5%) was infused during 40 minutes, yielding total doses of 1.0 g/kg (n = 15), and 1.5 g/kg (n = 12) with corresponding venous blood ethanol peak concentrations of 1.38 +/- 0.25 and 2.41 +/- 0.31 mg/ml, respectively. Heart rate increased up to 16% in groups receiving ethanol. In the control group receiving the equivalent volume of saline (n = 12) heart rate decreased 14%. Pulmonary arterial systolic pressure increased from 24 +/- 3 to 27 +/- 3 mmHg and diastolic pressure from 11 +/- 2 to 14 +/- 4 mmHg (p less than 0.05) when the ethanol dose was 1.0 g/kg. The pulmonary arterial resistance increased from 620 +/- 135 to 805 +/- 185 dyn.s.cm-5 (p less than 0.01). The peak dP/dt decreased maximally by 20% with increasing ethanol doses. Stroke volume decreased maximally by 14% but due to the increase in heart rate, cardiac output even increased. The changes in end-diastolic volume and pressure were not significant. Hence, the ethanol increased heart rate and afterload of the right ventricle but depressed the myocardium.
PubMed ID
1599626 View in PubMed
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Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
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The acute effects of inhaled salbutamol on the beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and blood pressure assessed by spectral analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208850
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
T. Jartti
T. Kaila
K. Tahvanainen
T. Kuusela
T. Vanto
I. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Albuterol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Bronchospirometry
Child
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Finland
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Respiratory Function Tests
Supine Position
Abstract
We wanted to study the effects of a 600 micrograms inhaled salbutamol dose on the cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation in eight children suffering from bronchial asthma.
In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we continuously measured electrocardiogram, finger systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and flow-volume spirometry at baseline as well as 20 min and 2 h after the drug inhalation. The R-R interval (the time between successive heart beats) and SAP variabilities were assessed by using spectral analysis. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by using cross-spectral analysis.
Salbutamol significantly decreased the total and low frequency (LF) variability of R-R intervals as well as the high frequency (HF) variability of R-R intervals and of SAP. Salbutamol significantly increased the LF/HF ratio of R-R intervals and of SAP, minute ventilation, heart rate and forced pulmonary function in comparison with placebo. The weight of the subjects significantly correlated positively with baroreflex sensitivity and negatively with heart rate after the salbutamol inhalation.
We conclude that the acute salbutamol inhalation decreases cardiovagal nervous responsiveness, increases sympathetic dominance in the cardiovascular autonomic balance, and has a tendency to decrease baroreflex sensitivity in addition to improved pulmonary function.
PubMed ID
9146855 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute intravenous and long-term oral hemodynamic effects of encainide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55611
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1986 Aug 29;58(5):25C-30C
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-1986
Author
M H Sami
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1986 Aug 29;58(5):25C-30C
Date
Aug-29-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Anilides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Arrhythmia - drug therapy
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Encainide
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Heart Ventricles
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The short- and long-term hemodynamic effects of encainide, a new class IC antiarrhythmic agent, were studied in 25 patients (mean age 61 +/- 11) with complex symptomatic ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular dysfunction. Ninety-two percent had previous myocardial infarction and 8% had dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-five percent had congestive heart failure, class III or IV, according to the New York Heart Association. All patients underwent a nuclear ventriculogram performed at least 3 days after discontinuing previous antiarrhythmic drugs. Nuclear ventriculograms were repeated 1 to 6 weeks later while the patients were receiving therapeutic doses of encainide ranging from 75 to 300 [corrected] mg/day. Nuclear ventriculograms were also repeated after 6 months or 1 year of encainide therapy in 16 of these patients. Encainide did not have significant effects on heart rate, blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, systolic or end-diastolic volumes. None of the patients showed a worsening of congestive heart failure during encainide therapy. These results compare favorably with those of other class I antiarrhythmic agents. A review of published reports on the hemodynamic effects of intravenous encainide shows it to have a mild but statistically significant dose-related depressant effect on cardiac function. This effect, however, appears to be no different from that of other newer class I agents.
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Cardiol 1988 Nov 15;62(16):1152
PubMed ID
3092616 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adrenomedullary catecholamine, pressor and chronotropic responses to human coagulation beta-FXIIa mediated by endogenous kinins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93828
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Jan;26(1):61-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Amfilochiadis Akis A
Backx Peter H
Floras John S
Author Affiliation
University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Canada.
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Jan;26(1):61-9
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Medulla - drug effects - physiology
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Bradykinin - blood - pharmacology
Catecholamines - blood
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Epinephrine - blood
Factor XIIa - pharmacology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Kininogens - blood - deficiency
Male
Norepinephrine - blood
Peptide Fragments - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Mutant Strains
Rats, Wistar
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: There is increasing evidence that blood coagulation factors can influence blood pressure. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the beta fragment of human coagulation factor XIIa (beta-FXIIa) induces adrenal catecholamine-mediated pressor and chronotropic responses via bradykinin generated from the plasma kallikrein-kinin system. METHODS AND RESULTS: In anaesthetized bioassay rats with blocked autonomic reflexes, in the Brown Norway strain a bolus injection of beta-FXIIa (1 microg/kg, administered intravenously) elicited a 170-fold rise in plasma epinephrine (from 0.12 +/- 0.02 to 20.58 +/- 2.42 nmol/l; P
PubMed ID
18090541 View in PubMed
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Adrenomedullin modulates hemodynamic and cardiac effects of angiotensin II in conscious rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9538
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jun;286(6):R1085-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Marja Luodonpää
Hanna Leskinen
Mika Ilves
Olli Vuolteenaho
Heikki Ruskoaho
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Biocenter Ouli, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jun;286(6):R1085-92
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin II - antagonists & inhibitors - pharmacology
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body Weight - drug effects
Echocardiography
Heart - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Hypertension - chemically induced - prevention & control
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - chemically induced - prevention & control
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Male
Membrane Proteins - biosynthesis - genetics
Norepinephrine - antagonists & inhibitors - pharmacology
Peptides - pharmacology
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - biosynthesis - genetics
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1 - biosynthesis - genetics
Receptors, Peptide - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Telemetry
Vasoconstrictor Agents - antagonists & inhibitors
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
We examined whether adrenomedullin, a vasoactive peptide expressed in the heart, modulates the increase in blood pressure, changes in systolic and diastolic function, and left ventricular hypertrophy produced by long-term administration of ANG II or norepinephrine in rats. Subcutaneous administration of adrenomedullin (1.5 microg.kg(-1).h(-1)) for 1 wk inhibited the ANG II-induced (33.3 microg.kg(-1).h(-1) sc) increase in mean arterial pressure by 67% (P
PubMed ID
14751847 View in PubMed
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181 records – page 1 of 19.