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30-year nationwide trends in incidence of atrial fibrillation in Denmark and associated 5-year risk of heart failure, stroke, and death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286741
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2016
Author
Morten Schmidt
Sinna Pilgaard Ulrichsen
Lars Pedersen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Jens Cosedis Nielsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Date
Dec-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Cohort Studies
Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Time Factors
Abstract
Long-term nationwide trends in atrial fibrillation (AF) incidence and 5-year outcomes are rare.
We conducted a population-based cohort study using the Danish National Patient Registry covering all Danish hospitals. We computed standardized incidence rates during 1983-2012. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of heart failure, stroke, and death within 5years, comparing 5-year calendar periods with the earliest period (1983-1987) as reference.
We identified 312,420 patients with first-time hospital-diagnosed AF. The incidence rate per 100,000person-years increased from 98 in 1983 to 307 in 2012. The mean annual increase during the 30-year study period was 4%, with a 6% increase annually until 2000 and a 1.4% increase annually thereafter. The incidence trends were most pronounced among men and persons above 70years. Among high-risk subgroups, AF incidence was consistently highest in patients with valvular heart disease or heart failure. The rate of heart failure following AF declined by 50% over the entire study period (HR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48-0.51) and the mortality rate declined by 40% (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.61-0.63). Within the last two decades, the rate for ischemic stroke declined by 20% (HR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.78-0.84), but increased almost as much for haemorrhagic stroke (HR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.29).
The long-term risk of heart failure, ischemic stroke, and death following onset of AF has decreased remarkably over the last three decades. Still, the threefold increased incidence of hospital-diagnosed AF during the same period is a major public health concern.
PubMed ID
27705839 View in PubMed
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Acromegaly incidence, prevalence, complications and long-term prognosis: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280006
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Sep;175(3):181-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jakob Dal
Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen
Marianne Andersen
Lars Ø Kristensen
Peter Laurberg
Lars Pedersen
Olaf M Dekkers
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Jens Otto L Jørgensen
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Sep;175(3):181-90
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Registries
Stroke - epidemiology
Abstract
Valid data on acromegaly incidence, complications and mortality are scarce. The Danish Health Care System enables nationwide studies with complete follow-up and linkage among health-related databases to assess acromegaly incidence, prevalence, complications and mortality in a population-based cohort study.
All incident cases of acromegaly in Denmark (1991-2010) were identified from health registries and validated by chart review. We estimated the annual incidence rate of acromegaly per 10(6) person-years (py) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). For every patient, 10 persons were sampled from the general population as a comparison cohort. Cox regression and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used.
Mean age at diagnosis (48.7 years (CI: 95%: 47.2-50.1)) and annual incidence rate (3.8 cases/10(6) persons (95% CI: 3.6-4.1)) among the 405 cases remained stable. The prevalence in 2010 was 85 cases/10(6) persons. The patients were at increased risk of diabetes mellitus (HR: 4.0 (95% CI: 2.7-5.8)), heart failure (HR: 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-4.5)), venous thromboembolism (HR: 2.3 (95% CI: 1.1-5.0)), sleep apnoea (HR: 11.7 (95% CI: 7.0-19.4)) and arthropathy (HR: 2.1 (95% CI: 1.6-2.6)). The complication risk was also increased before the diagnosis of acromegaly. Overall mortality risk was elevated (HR: 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0-1.7)) but uninfluenced by treatment modality.
(i) The incidence rate and age at diagnosis of acromegaly have been stable over decades, and the prevalence is higher than previously reported. (ii) The risk of complications is very high even before the diagnosis. (iii) Mortality risk remains elevated but uninfluenced by mode of treatment.
PubMed ID
27280374 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury and long-term risk of stroke after coronary artery bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107407
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 15;168(6):5405-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2013
Author
Martin J Holzmann
Linda Rydén
Ulrik Sartipy
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: martin.holzmann@karolinska.se.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 15;168(6):5405-10
Date
Oct-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology - mortality
Age Distribution
Aged
Cerebral Hemorrhage - epidemiology - mortality
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - mortality - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Heart Failure - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with death, end-stage renal disease, and heart failure in patients with coronary heart disease. This study investigated the association between AKI and long-term risk of stroke.
50,244 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in Sweden between 2000 and 2008 were identified from the SWEDEHEART registry. After exclusions 23,584 patients without prior stroke who underwent elective, primary, isolated, CABG were included. AKI was categorized according to absolute increases in postoperative creatinine values compared with preoperative values: stage 1, 0.3-0.5 mg/dL (26-44 µmol/L); stage 2, 0.5-1.0mg/dL (44-88 µmol/L); and stage 3, >1.0 mg/dL (=88 µmol/L). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for stroke. There were 1156 (4.9%) strokes during a mean follow-up of 4.1 years. After adjustment for confounders, HRs (95% CIs) for stroke in AKI stages 1, 2 and 3 were 1.12 (0.89-1.39), 1.31 (1.04-1.66) and 1.31 (0.92-1.87), respectively, compared with no AKI. This association disappeared after taking death into account in competing risk analysis. There was a significant association between AKI and stroke in men (HR: 1.26 [1.05-1.50]) but not in women (HR: 1.07 [0.75-1.53]), and in younger (
PubMed ID
24012170 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury following coronary artery bypass surgery and long-term risk of heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118220
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2013 Jan;6(1):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Daniel Olsson
Ulrik Sartipy
Frieder Braunschweig
Martin J Holzmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2013 Jan;6(1):83-90
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - blood - complications - epidemiology
Aged
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects
Coronary Artery Disease - surgery
Creatinine - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Postoperative Complications
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Acute kidney injury (AKI) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is common and increases the risk of postoperative complications and mortality. There is little information on the association between AKI after CABG and long-term risk of incident heart failure (HF).
All patients (n=24 018) undergoing primary, isolated CABG in Sweden between 2000 and 2008 with complete information on pre- and postoperative serum creatinine values, and no prior hospitalization for HF were included. The postoperative increase in serum creatinine was used to define different stages of AKI: stage 1, 0.3 to 0.5 mg/dL; stage 2, 0.5 to 1 mg/dL; stage 3, >1 mg/dL. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for first hospitalization for HF for each stage of AKI using Cox proportional hazards regression. Twelve percent of the study population developed AKI. During a mean follow-up of 4.1 years, there were 1325 cases (5.5%) of incident HF. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence interval for HF in AKI stage 1, 2, and 3 were 1.60 (1.34-1.92), 1.87 (1.54-2.27), and 1.98 (1.53-2.57), respectively, after multivariable adjustment for age, sex, diabetes mellitus, estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular ejection fraction, and myocardial infarction before surgery or during follow-up.
AKI is associated with increased long-term risk of HF after CABG. Patients with AKI after CABG should be followed closely to detect early changes in cardiac function.
PubMed ID
23230310 View in PubMed
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The added value of hybrid ventilation/perfusion SPECT/CT in patients with stable COPD or apparently healthy smokers. Cancer-suspected CT findings in the lungs are common when hybrid imaging is used.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266278
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015;10:25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jonas Jögi
Hanna Markstad
Ellen Tufvesson
Leif Bjermer
Marika Bajc
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015;10:25-30
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Lung - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Multimodal Imaging
Perfusion Imaging - methods
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Pulmonary Emphysema - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Ventilation/perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is recognized as a diagnostic method with potential beyond the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. V/P SPECT identifies functional impairment in diseases such as heart failure (HF), pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The development of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) systems, combining functional with morphological imaging through the addition of low-dose CT (LDCT), may be useful in COPD, as these patients are prone to lung cancer and other comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the added value of LDCT among healthy smokers and patients with stable COPD, when examined with V/P SPECT/CT hybrid imaging. Sixty-nine subjects, 55 with COPD (GOLD I-IV) and 14 apparently healthy smokers, were examined with V/P SPECT and LDCT hybrid imaging. Spirometry was used to verify COPD grade. Only one apparently healthy smoker and three COPD patients had a normal or nearly normal V/P SPECT. All other patients showed various degrees of airway obstruction, even when spirometry was normal. The same interpretation was reached on both modalities in 39% of the patients. LDCT made V/P SPECT interpretation more certain in 9% of the patients and, in 52%, LDCT provided additional diagnoses. LDCT better characterized the type of emphysema in 12 patients. In 19 cases, tumor-suspected changes were reported. Three of these 19 patients (ie, 4.3% of all subjects) were in the end confirmed to have lung cancer. The majority of LDCT findings were not regarded as clinically significant. V/P SPECT identified perfusion patterns consistent with decompensated left ventricular HF in 14 COPD patients. In 16 patients (23%), perfusion defects were observed. HF and perfusion defects were not recognized with LDCT. In COPD patients and long-time smokers, hybrid imaging had added value compared to V/P SPECT alone, by identifying patients with lung malignancy and more clearly identifying emphysema. V/P SPECT visualizes comorbidities to COPD not seen with LDCT, such as pulmonary embolism and left ventricular HF.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25565797 View in PubMed
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Age and sex variations in hospital readmissions for COPD associated with overall and cardiac comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152146
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2009 Mar;13(3):394-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Y. Chen
Q. Li
H. Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ychen@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2009 Mar;13(3):394-9
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Pulmonary Heart Disease - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
To determine sex and age variations in hospital readmissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) associated with overall and cardiac comorbid conditions.
A one-year follow-up study was conducted for 108 726 COPD in-patients aged >or=40 years who were discharged alive after their first admission in the 1999-2000 fiscal year.
Within a year, 38 955 of the patients were readmitted to hospital for COPD. The incidence rate of COPD readmission was 49.1% per year. It was higher for men than women aged >or=70 years, but was almost the same for patients aged
PubMed ID
19275803 View in PubMed
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[Age-related sarcopenia as the risk factor of development of myocardial dysfunction and chronic heart failure in elderly patients with arterial hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117533
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(3):456-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
N V Medvedev
N K Gorshunova
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(3):456-60
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiomyopathies - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology - physiopathology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sarcopenia - complications - epidemiology
Ventricular Function - physiology
Abstract
To estimate the expressiveness of involutive sarcopenia and its influences on the development of myocardial dysfunctions 88 patients of 60+ years with arterial hypertension (AH) II stage (middle age 66.9 +/- 0.7 years, 76 women and 12 men) and 32 persons who do not have cardiovascular diseases were surveyed. It is revealed that expressiveness of involutive sarcopenia is non-uniform at senior patients; structural and functional changes of heart in elderly patients with AH clinically shown by myocardial dysfunction, decreased tolerance to physical activity, are more pronounced in the group of patients with a low index of muscular weight. High values of the indicators of oxidative modification of lipids in the blood serum and the insufficiency of mechanisms of antioxidant protection in elderly patients with AH who have low index of muscle mass point to the negative role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of involutive sarcopenia.
PubMed ID
23289222 View in PubMed
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Age-Specific Trends in Incidence, Mortality, and Comorbidities of Heart Failure in Denmark, 1995 to 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282234
Source
Circulation. 2017 Mar 28;135(13):1214-1223
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-2017
Author
Mia N Christiansen
Lars Køber
Peter Weeke
Ramachandran S Vasan
Jørgen L Jeppesen
J Gustav Smith
Gunnar H Gislason
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Charlotte Andersson
Source
Circulation. 2017 Mar 28;135(13):1214-1223
Date
Mar-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The cumulative burden and importance of cardiovascular risk factors have changed over the past decades. Specifically, obesity rates have increased among younger people, whereas cardiovascular health has improved in the elderly. Little is known regarding how these changes have impacted the incidence and the mortality rates of heart failure. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the age-specific trends in the incidence and 1-year mortality rates following a first-time diagnosis of heart failure in Denmark between 1995 and 2012.
We included all Danish individuals >18 years of age with a first-time in-hospital diagnosis of heart failure. Data were collected from 3 nationwide Danish registries. Annual incidence rates of heart failure and 1-year standardized mortality rates were calculated under the assumption of a Poisson distribution.
We identified 210?430 individuals with a first-time diagnosis of heart failure between 1995 and 2012; the annual incidence rates per 10?000 person-years declined among older individuals (rates in 1995 versus 2012: 164 versus 115 in individuals >74 years, 63 versus 35 in individuals 65-74 years, and 20 versus 17 in individuals 55-64 years; P50 years of age, and 1.52 (95% confidence interval, 1.33-1.73; P50 years), but increased among younger (=50 years) individuals. These observations may portend a rising burden of heart failure in the community.
PubMed ID
28174193 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria and renal function as predictors of cardiovascular events and mortality in a general population of patients with type 2 diabetes: a nationwide observational study from the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107516
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2013 Nov;10(6):520-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Maria K Svensson
Jan Cederholm
Björn Eliasson
Björn Zethelius
Soffia Gudbjörnsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2013 Nov;10(6):520-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Kidney - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Reduced renal function and albuminuria predict cardiovascular (CV) events and mortality in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In addition, we evaluated the role of co-existing congestive heart failure (CHF) and other CV risk factors on CV events in a large observational population-based cohort of T2D patients.
We included 66,065 patients with T2D who were reported to the National Diabetes Register (NDR) in Sweden between 2003-2006 with a follow-up of 5.7 years. Data on outcomes were collected from the cause of death and hospital discharge registers.
A total of 10% of patients experienced a CV event and 3.7% of these were fatal. Increasing levels of albuminuria and renal impairment were independently associated with increasing risk of CV events and all-cause mortality also when adjusting for CHF. In normoalbuminuric patients, a reduction in renal function is an important predictor of CV events and all-cause mortality. Glycaemic control (high HbA1c), smoking and hyperlipidaemia had important effects on risk for CV events in patients with albuminuria, while high blood pressure, but not glycaemic control, had an effect in patients with normoalbuminuric renal impairment.
Albuminuria and renal impairment are independent risk factors for CV outcomes and mortality in T2D, albuminuria being the strongest risk factor and relevant at all levels of renal function. In normoalbuminuric patients, a reduction in renal function is an important predictor of CV events and all-cause mortality.
PubMed ID
24002670 View in PubMed
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a-Linolenic acid, linoleic acid and heart failure in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128724
Source
Br J Nutr. 2012 Oct;108(7):1300-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Emily B Levitan
Alicja Wolk
Niclas Håkansson
Murray A Mittleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, RPHB 230K, 1530 3rd Avenue S, Birmingham, AL 35294-0022, USA. elevitan@uab.edu
Source
Br J Nutr. 2012 Oct;108(7):1300-6
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Linoleic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
a-Linolenic acid (18 : 3n-3) intake and linoleic acid (18 : 2n-6) intake have been associated with lower rates of CHD, though results have not been consistent. The relationship of these fatty acids with incident heart failure (HF) is not well established. We examined the hypothesis that women with higher intakes of 18 : 3n-3 and 18 : 2n-6 would have lower rates of HF hospitalisation and mortality. We measured 18 : 3n-3 and 18 : 2n-6 intake in 36 234 Swedish Mammography Cohort participants aged 48-83 years using FFQ and followed participants through Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers from 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2006. Cox models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95 % CI. Because of multicollinearity, 18 : 3n-3 and 18 : 2n-6 were examined separately. Over 9 years, 596 women were hospitalised and fifty-five died due to HF. In models accounting for age and other covariates, the RR for HF comparing the top quintile of 18 : 3n-3 (median 1·50 g/d) with the bottom quintile (median 0·88 g/d) was 0·91 (95 % CI 0·71, 1·17, P(trend) = 0·41). The RR comparing the top quintile of 18 : 2n-6 (median 7·8 g/d) with the bottom quintile (median 4·6 g/d) was 1·14 (95 % CI 0·88, 1·46, P(trend) = 0·36). We did not find evidence for the interaction of 18 : 3n-3 and 18 : 2n-6 with each other or with long-chain n-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, these data do not support our hypothesis that 18 : 3n-3 and 18 : 2n-6 are associated with HF. However, these results may not be generalisable to populations with higher intakes of 18 : 3n-3.
PubMed ID
22172525 View in PubMed
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212 records – page 1 of 22.