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Patient-centred home-based management of heart failure. Findings from a randomised clinical trial evaluating a tablet computer for self-care, quality of life and effects on knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271540
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2015 Aug;49(4):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ewa Hägglund
Patrik Lyngå
Filippa Frie
Bengt Ullman
Hans Persson
Michael Melin
Inger Hagerman
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2015 Aug;49(4):193-9
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Weight
Computers, Handheld
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Failure - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Readmission
Patient-Centered Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - instrumentation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate whether a new home intervention system (HIS, OPTILOGG(®)) consisting of a specialised software, a tablet computer (tablet) wirelessly connected to a weight scale may improve self-care behaviour, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), knowledge about heart failure (HF) and reduce hospital days due to HF.
82 patients (32% females) with mean age: 75 ± 8 years hospitalised with HF were randomised at discharge to an intervention group (IG) equipped with the HIS or to a control group (CG) receiving standard HF information only. The tablet contained information about HF and lifestyle advice according to current guidelines. It also showed present dose of diuretic, changes in patient-measured weight and HRQoL over time.
After 3 months the IG displayed a dramatic improvement in self-care with p
PubMed ID
25968968 View in PubMed
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