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[50-year health survey provides material for preventive heart care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56343
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1971 Aug 25;38(15):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-1971
Author
H. Roempke
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1971 Aug 25;38(15):12
Date
Aug-25-1971
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health planning
Health Surveys
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Nursing
Sweden
PubMed ID
5208756 View in PubMed
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Adoption of the Healthy Heart Kit by Alberta family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147884
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):140-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Raphaël Bize
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Shannon D Scott
Nandini Karunamuni
Wendy Rodgers
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):140-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Abstract
The Healthy Heart Kit (HHK) is a risk management and patient education kit for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the promotion of CV health. There are currently no published data examining predictors of HHK use by physicians. The main objective of this study was to examine the association between physicians' characteristics (socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural) and the use of the HHK.
All registered family physicians in Alberta (n=3068) were invited to participate in the "Healthy Heart Kit" Study. Consenting physicians (n=153) received the Kit and were requested to use it for two months. At the end of this period, a questionnaire collected data on the frequency of Kit use by physicians, as well as socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural variables pertaining to the physicians.
The questionnaire was returned by 115 physicians (follow-up rate = 75%). On a scale ranging from 0 to 100, the mean score of Kit use was 61 [SD=26]. A multiple linear regression showed that "agreement with the Kit" and the degree of "confidence in using the Kit" was strongly associated with Kit use, explaining 46% of the variability for Kit use. Time since graduation was inversely associated with Kit use, and a trend was observed for smaller practices to be associated with lower use.
Given these findings, future research and practice should explore innovative strategies to gain initial agreement among physicians to employ such clinical tools. Participation of older physicians and solo-practitioners in this process should be emphasized.
PubMed ID
19839292 View in PubMed
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Au coeur de la vie: the Quebec Heart Health Dissemination Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192726
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Renaud
G. Paradis
Author Affiliation
Direction de la santé publique de Montréal-Centre, Université de Montréal, département de médecine sociale et préventive, Montréal, Québec.
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:22-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Information Services - organization & administration
National health programs - organization & administration
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
"Au coeur de la vie" is a research project which aims to evaluate the impact of a heart health dissemination program on primary and secondary prevention practices in local community clinics in the province of Quebec, Canada. Because the project starts in 2001 and no data has been collected to date this paper presents the theoretical model, the objectives of the program, the description of the dissemination procedures, and a brief overview of the evaluation.
PubMed ID
11677819 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Nov;16(11):1367-8; 1370-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
A. Lefever
Author Affiliation
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Nov;16(11):1367-8; 1370-1
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Foundations
Health Policy
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Stroke - prevention & control
PubMed ID
11109033 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure control in Hispanics in the antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment to prevent heart attack trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161463
Source
Hypertension. 2007 Nov;50(5):854-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Karen L Margolis
Linda B Piller
Charles E Ford
Mario A Henriquez
William C Cushman
Paula T Einhorn
Pedro J Colon
Donald G Vidt
Rudell Christian
Nathan D Wong
Jackson T Wright
David C Goff
Author Affiliation
HealthPartners Research Foundation PO Box 1524, Mailstop 21111R, Minneapolis, MN 55440-1524, USA. Karen.L.Margolis@HealthPartners.com
Source
Hypertension. 2007 Nov;50(5):854-61
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Amlodipine - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Canada
Chlorthalidone - therapeutic use
Clonidine - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Doxazosin - therapeutic use
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydralazine - therapeutic use
Hypertension - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Lisinopril - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Puerto Rico
Reserpine - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
United States
United States Virgin Islands
Abstract
Historically, blood pressure control in Hispanics has been considerably less than that of non-Hispanic whites and blacks. We compared determinants of blood pressure control among Hispanic white, Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black participants (N=32 642) during follow-up in a randomized, practice-based, active-controlled trial. Hispanic blacks and whites represented 3% and 16% of the cohort, respectively; 33% were non-Hispanic black and 48% were non-Hispanic white. Hispanics were less likely to be controlled (
PubMed ID
17846352 View in PubMed
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Building capacity for heart health promotion: results of a 5-year experience in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186929
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
David R MacLean
Jane Farquharson
Stephanie Heath
Kari Barkhouse
Celeste Latter
Christine Joffres
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, 5849 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4H7 Canada.
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Education
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Nova Scotia
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
To present the outcomes of a capacity-building initiative for heart health promotion.
Follow-up study combining quantitative and qualitative methods.
The Western Health Region of Nova Scotia, Canada.
Twenty organizations, including provincial and municipal agencies and community groups engaged in health, education, and recreation activities.
Two strategies were used for this study: partnership development and organizational development. Partnership development included the creation of multilevel partnerships in diverse sectors. Organizational development included the provision of technical support, action research, community activation, and organizational consultation.
Quantitative data included number and type of partnerships, learning opportunities, community activation initiatives, and organizational changes. Qualitative data included information on the effectiveness of partnerships, organizational consultation, and organizational changes.
Results included the development of 204 intersectoral partnerships, creation of a health promotion clearinghouse, 47 workshops attended by approximately 1400 participants, diverse research products, implementation of 18 community heart health promotion initiatives, and increased organizational capacity for heart health promotion via varied organizational changes, including policy changes, fund reallocations, and enhanced knowledge and practices.
Partnership and organizational development were effective mechanisms for building capacity in heart health promotion. This intervention may have implications for large-scale, community-based, chronic-disease prevention projects.
PubMed ID
12545589 View in PubMed
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Canadian children: will today's "couch potatoes" be tomorrow's cardiac patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233251
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Apr 1;138(7):648-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1988
Author
B. Goldman
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Apr 1;138(7):648-9
Date
Apr-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Physical Exertion
Physical Fitness
PubMed ID
3355938 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian efforts to prevent and control hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140563
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:14C-7C
Publication Type
Article
Author
Norman R C Campbell
Guanmin Chen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lubin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Alberta, Calgary, Canada. ncampbel@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:14C-7C
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Dietetics
Health education
Health Policy
Heart Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Incidence
Nutrition Therapy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
Suboptimum blood pressure is estimated to be the leading risk factor for death worldwide and is associated with 13.5% of deaths globally. The clinical diagnosis of hypertension affects one in four adults globally and is expected to increase by 60% between 2000 and 2025. Clearly, global efforts to prevent and control hypertension are important health issues. While Canada had a prevalence of hypertension similar to that of the United States in the early 1990 s, the treatment and control rate was only 13% compared with 25% in the United States. A national strategic plan was developed, and a coalition of organizations and health care professional and scientist volunteers actively implemented parts of the strategy. Specific initiatives that have evolved include the development of hypertension knowledge translation programs for health professionals, the public and people with hypertension, an outcomes research program to assess the impact of hypertension and guide national-, regional- and community-based knowledge translation interventions, and a program to reduce the prevalence of hypertension by decreasing sodium additives in food. These initiatives have relied on the active involvement of health care professional volunteers, health care professional and scientific organizations and various government departments. There have been large increases in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, with corresponding reductions in cardiovascular disease and total mortality associated with the start of the hypertension initiatives. As a result, Canada is becoming recognized as a world leader in the prevention, treatment and control of hypertension.
Notes
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Jul;27(7):1472-719474763
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2001 Nov;14(11 Pt 1):1099-10511724207
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Jan;22(1):11-915106785
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Cites: Public Health Rep. 1987 Sep-Oct;102(5):522-93116583
Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1557-628622246
Cites: Hypertension. 1997 Nov;30(5):1020-49369249
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2005 Feb;18(2 Pt 1):270-515752956
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):556-816755309
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):599-60316755315
Cites: Hypertension. 2006 Nov;48(5):853-6016982958
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):437-4317487286
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):557-6017534462
Cites: Lancet. 2008 May 3;371(9623):1513-818456100
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1441-918490640
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):485-9018548146
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):497-118548148
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):507-1218548150
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):105-719114644
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):128-3419114646
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-9819417859
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 Jun;30(12):1434-919454575
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1087-9311021952
PubMed ID
20847986 View in PubMed
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Can the Canadian Heart Health Initiative inform the population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152238
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):Suppl I20-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Barbara L Riley
Sylvie Stachenko
Elinor Wilson
Dexter Harvey
Roy Cameron
Jane Farquharson
Catherine Donovan
Gregory Taylor
Author Affiliation
Canadian Cancer Society's Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, University of Waterloo, Lyle S. Hallman Institute North, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1. briley@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):Suppl I20-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Based Participatory Research
Decision Making, Organizational
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interdisciplinary Communication
Intervention Studies
Leadership
Policy Making
Professional Competence
Public Health - education
Public Health Administration
Public-Private Sector Partnerships - organization & administration
Research Support as Topic
Voluntary Health Agencies
Abstract
The aim of the Population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada (PHIRIC) is to build capacity to increase the quantity, quality and use of population health intervention research. But what capacity is required, and how should capacity be created? There may be relevant lessons from the Canadian Heart Health Initiative (CHHI), a 20-year initiative (1986-2006) that was groundbreaking in its attempt to bring together researchers and public health leaders (from government and non-government organizations) to jointly plan, conduct and act on relevant evidence. The present study focused on what enabled and constrained the ability to fund, conduct and use science in the CHHI.
Guided by a provisional capacity-building framework, a two-step methodology was used: a CHHI document analysis followed by consultation with CHHI leaders to refine and confirm emerging findings.
A few well-positioned, visionary people conceived of the CHHI as a long-term, coherent initiative that would have impact, and they then created an environment to enable this to become reality. To achieve the vision, capacity was needed to a) align science (research and evaluation) with public health policy and program priorities, including the capacity to study "natural experiments" and b) build meaningful partnerships within and across sectors.
There is now an opportunity to apply lessons from the CHHI in planning PHIRIC.
PubMed ID
19263979 View in PubMed
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Capacity building for health promotion and chronic disease prevention--Nova Scotia's experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192727
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
S. Heath
J. Farquharson
D R MacLean
K. Barkhouse
C. Latter
C. Joffres
Author Affiliation
Heart Health Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:17-22
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Logistic Models
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Nova Scotia
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development - methods
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to report on the capacity building efforts that took place during the dissemination research phase of Heart Health Nova Scotia (HHNS). HHNS, a health promotion research team, is funded by Health Canada and the Nova Scotia Department of Health. It is located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, a province of 937,000 people situated on the east coast of Canada. It has been a member of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative since its inception in 1989. The first phase of the program, Demonstration, was successfully completed in December 1995 (Heart Health Nova Scotia, 1995). In 1996, HHNS entered its second phase, Dissemination Research, which was conducted between April 1996 and March 2001 in the Western Health Region of Nova Scotia. This was completed in collaboration with organizations, community groups, and government agencies who joined HHNS to form the Heart Health Partnership (HHP) (Heart Health Nova Scotia, 2001). The main aim of this phase of the initiative was to build and research organizational capacity for health promotion and chronic disease prevention.
PubMed ID
11677818 View in PubMed
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72 records – page 1 of 8.