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103 records – page 1 of 11.

Acute myocardial infarction in the Copenhagen area in November 1968. Incidence and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56353
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1971 Apr;189(4):279-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1971

Alcohol and cardiovascular mortality in Moscow; new evidence of a causal association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201591
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Dec;52(12):772-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
L. Chenet
M. McKee
D. Leon
V. Shkolnikov
S. Vassin
Author Affiliation
European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Dec;52(12):772-4
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality
Female
Heart Diseases - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
In explaining recent trends in Russian mortality, alcohol drinking has often been put forward as a major factor. However, cardiovascular disease remains the major cause of death in Russia and alcohol is currently viewed as having a protective effect on heart disease. This study explores this apparent paradox by examining daily trends in deaths from cardiovascular disease in Moscow.
Those dying in Moscow in the years 1993-1995.
Analysis of daily variation in deaths based on data from Moscow City death certificates.
There is a significant increase in deaths from alcohol poisoning, accidents, and violence and cardiovascular diseases on Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays. This is especially marked for sudden deaths. This pattern is consistent with the known pattern of drinking in Russia, which is more likely to take place in binges than is the case in other countries.
A possible causative role for alcohol in sudden cardiovascular death is suggested as there are no other obvious explanations for this pattern, which cannot be accounted for by daily variations in traditional risk factors such as smoking or lipids. Although this is inconsistent with the prevailing view in the West that alcohol is seen as cardioprotective, there is considerable supporting evidence from a necropsy study and from studies in other places with a similar pattern of drinking. In countries such as Russia, where patterns of drinking differ considerably from that in the West, binge drinking can be an important cause of sudden cardiac death. This has important implications for estimates of the amount of mortality worldwide attributable to specific risk factors and thus for national and international policy.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1997 Aug 9;350(9075):383-89259651
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Oct 4;315(7112):846-519353504
Cites: Br Heart J. 1975 Nov;37(11):1133-431191428
Cites: Epidemiology. 1997 May;8(3):310-49115028
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1987;221(4):335-413604749
Cites: Br Heart J. 1992 Nov;68(5):443-81467026
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Mar 11;310(6980):646-87703754
Cites: Stroke. 1996 Jun;27(6):1033-98650710
Cites: Am Heart J. 1983 Apr;105(4):667-736837419
Comment In: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Dec;52(12):766-710396514
PubMed ID
10396517 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of lethal outcomes of rheumatic diseases in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184598
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(5):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Sh Erdes
A B Demina
O M Folomeeva
S G Radenska-Lopovok
O V Zairat'iants
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(5):78-82
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
Bone Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Humans
Middle Aged
Moscow
Muscular Diseases - mortality
Myocardium - pathology
Rheumatic Diseases - mortality - pathology
Rheumatic Fever - mortality - pathology
Rheumatic Heart Disease - mortality - pathology
Russia
Abstract
To study the pattern of lethal outcomes due to rheumatic diseases (RD) in Moscow.
Annual reports of 38 pathological departments of Moscow have been analysed for 1999 and 2000.
RD accounted for 1.8% diagnosis at autopsies (n = 784). RD as the main diagnosis was in 668 cases (1.53%). Diseases of the bone-muscle system caused death 3.5 times less often than rheumatism. As concommitent diseases RD were encountered in 118 cases (0.27%), diseases of the bone-muscle system were registered 2 times less frequently than rheumatism. Chronic rheumatic diseases of the heart were diagnosed in 590 cases (98.5%), rheumatic fever was detected in 9 (1.5%) patients. The main diagnosis of RA, seronegative arthritides, systemic vasculitides, SLE, osteoarthrosis was made in 49, 10 9.3, 12.7, 1.3%, respectively. Such nosological entities as osteoporosis, gout and other microcrystalline arthritides were referred to the group "other rheumatic diseases" and made up 12.7%. As concomitant pathology RA, OA, seronegative spondyloarthritides, SLE, other RD occurred in 54, 8.1, 27, 2.7, 2.7%, respectively.
The share of RD in autopsy diagnosis accounts for 1.8% of the total number of necropsies. These figures seem to underestimate the real situation and may be explained by poor registration of RD at autopsy and a fall in the total number of autopsies for the last 10 years. For Moscow and Russia as a whole there is a prevalence of rheumatism mortality (76%), primarily deaths of chronic rheumatic cardiac diseases, over mortality due to diseases of the bone-muscular system (24%).
PubMed ID
12847905 View in PubMed
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[A physician-staffed heart ambulance in a rural district. A 1-year trial]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55226
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Sep 2;153(36):2477-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-1991
Author
K. Garde
I. Andresen
B A Clausen
T. Mondorf
Author Affiliation
Anaestesiafdelingen, Slagelse Centralsygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Sep 2;153(36):2477-9
Date
Sep-2-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - standards
Denmark
Emergencies
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Heart Diseases - mortality - therapy
Humans
Physicians
Resuscitation - methods
Rural Population
Abstract
A trial period of one year in which the ambulance service for patients with acute cardiac disease was improved is described. This trial took pace in the County of Vestsjaelland in a mixed urban and rural district with five general practices and with more than fifteen kilometres (9.4 miles) to the county hospital. Two ambulance stations were equipped with defibrillators and the staff were trained in their use. The recommendations made by a subcommittee appointed by the Danish Board of Health were thus fulfilled, but, in addition, the general practitioners/doctors-on-duty were connected with the arrangement. They were equipped with radios by which they could communicate with the ambulance stations. If the leader of the ambulance station considered, on the basis of the alarm, that a patient with acute cardiac disease was involved, the doctor-on-duty in the district concerned was contact so that he could come and participate in the treatment unless prevented by other work. An attempt was made to assess the effect of an arrangement such as this on survival of patients, the extent to which medical assistance can be obtained and the extent of the actual medical assistance. During the trial period, 158 turn-outs occurred to the approximately 30,000 population in the district concerned. The total number of emergency ambulance turn-outs was 1,200, 41 of these were patients with clinical cardiac arrest and 56 to patients with other forms of acute cardiac disease. Sixty-one patients were found to have conditions other than cardiac diseases. It proved possible to provide medical assistance in 79% of the cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1926598 View in PubMed
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Arteriosclerotic and other degenerative heart diseases in Finland. I. A death certificate study of the frequency of degenerative heart diseases among males and females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252673
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1975;3(2):61-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
A. Penttilä
A. Ahonen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1975;3(2):61-7
Date
1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arteriosclerosis - mortality
Female
Finland
Heart Diseases - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Abstract
All available information recorded on the death certificates of 12973 Finnish persons who, according to the official Finnish mortality statistics, died in 1968 from arteriosclerotic and other degenerative heart diseases (ADHD, rubrics 420-422 in ICD) comprised the material of the present study. The mortality of males from ADHD analysed by age and place of residence was very high when compared with various national rates of international WHO statistics. The degree of urbanization of the domicile did not have any statistically significant effect on the mortality from ADHD. Significant differences between various provinces were found in the mortality of males from ADHD. The male population living in the eastern provinces of Finland showed a highly significantly higher mortality from degenerative heart diseases than the male population living on the west coast. A highly significant difference was found in mortality between various subgroups of the Finnish male and female populations analysed by age, place of residence, and type of community. The uniform difference between the mortality of various male and female subgroups of the Finnish population, which was obtained using the present statistical survey of death certificates, and the fairly uniform distribution of high rate of mortality of males from degenerative heart diseases in most regions of the country lend further support to the reliability of cause-of-death statistics, since certification of deaths can then be regarded to occur uniformly and with about the same accuracy in different parts of the country.
PubMed ID
1179186 View in PubMed
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Arteriosclerotic and other degenerative heart diseases in Finland. II. A death certificate study of the examination of the cause of death from degenerative heart diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252672
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1975;3(2):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
A. Penttilä
A. Ahonen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1975;3(2):69-74
Date
1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arteriosclerosis - mortality - pathology
Autopsy
Female
Finland
Heart Diseases - mortality - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
A statistical survey of death certificates was made to analyse the ante-mortem and post-mortem medical and medico-legal examinations used in the determination of the cause of death of 12973 decedents who were recorded officially to have died of arteriosclerotic and other degenerative heart diseases in Finland in 1968. The relationship between the regional autopsy rate and the rate of mortality from degenerative heart diseases was studied in particular. The survey indicated that there was no systematic relationship between the type of ante-mortem and post-mortem cause-of-death examinations, including medical and medico-legal autopsies, and the rate of mortality from arteriosclerotic and other degenerative heart diseases in various groups of the Finnish population analysed by age, sex and domicile. This was concluded to be an indication of the reliability of Finnish cause-of-death statistics of degenerative heart diseases which show a generally high rate of mortality and prominent regional differences in the rate of deaths from those diseases among the Finnish male population.
PubMed ID
1179187 View in PubMed
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The association between ambient carbon monoxide levels and daily mortality in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204570
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 1998 Aug;48(8):689-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
R T Burnett
S. Cakmak
M E Raizenne
D. Stieb
R. Vincent
D. Krewski
J R Brook
O. Philips
H. Ozkaynak
Author Affiliation
Health Protection Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 1998 Aug;48(8):689-700
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Heart Diseases - mortality
Humans
Mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
The role of ambient levels of carbon monoxide (CO) in the exacerbation of heart problems in individuals with both cardiac and other diseases was examined by comparing daily variations in CO levels and daily fluctuations in nonaccidental mortality in metropolitan Toronto for the 15-year period 1980-1994. After adjusting the mortality time series for day-of-the-week effects, nonparametic smoothed functions of day of study and weather variables, statistically significant positive associations were observed between daily fluctuations in mortality and ambient levels of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, coefficient of haze, total suspended particulate matter, sulfates, and estimated PM2.5 and PM10. However, the effects of this complex mixture of air pollutants could be almost completely explained by the levels of CO and total suspended particulates (TSP). Of the 40 daily nonaccidental deaths in metropolitan Toronto, 4.7% (95% confidence interval of 3.4%-6.1%) could be attributable to CO while TSP contributed an additional 1.0% (95% confidence interval of 0.2-1.9%), based on changes in CO and TSP equivalent to their average concentrations. Statistically significant positive associations were observed between CO and mortality in all seasons, age, and disease groupings examined. Carbon monoxide should be considered as a potential public health risk to urban populations at current ambient exposure levels.
PubMed ID
9739623 View in PubMed
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Association of high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol with mortality and other risk factors for major chronic noncommunicable diseases in samples of US and Russian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215294
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1995 May;5(3):179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
N V Perova
R G Oganov
D H Williams
S H Irving
J R Abernathy
A D Deev
D B Shestov
G S Zhukovsky
C E Davis
H A Tyroler
Author Affiliation
National Center for Preventive Medicine of the Russian Federation, Moscow.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1995 May;5(3):179-85
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Diseases - mortality
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - blood - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous reports from the Russian Lipid Research Clinics (LRC) study showed no association between the level of high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD), while US LRC data indicated a strong negative association between HDL cholesterol and CHD mortality. This report investigated the association of HDL cholesterol and mortality in these same population samples with follow-up extended to 12 years. The association between HDL cholesterol and mortality remained inverse and significant in the US sample. In the Russian sample, high levels of HDL cholesterol were associated with higher risk of all-cause and cancer mortality, although adjustment for known risk factors reduced the strength of the association. The association between HDL cholesterol and CHD mortality was negative in the Russian sample, although the strength of the association was less than that for the US sample. Extended follow-up reduced the difference in the association between HDL cholesterol and mortality between the two countries; however, important differences remained. Further research will be required to clearly determine the cause for their differences.
PubMed ID
7606306 View in PubMed
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Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: surgical therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136940
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):67-73
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Pierre Pagé
Author Affiliation
Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Québec, Canada. pierre.page@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):67-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Atrial Appendage - surgery
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology - mortality - surgery
Canada
Catheter Ablation
Combined Modality Therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Heart Atria - surgery
Heart Diseases - mortality - surgery
Humans
Long-Term Care
Mitral Valve - surgery
Pulmonary Veins - surgery
Reoperation
Survival Rate
Thromboembolism - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
Surgery for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been demonstrated as an effective treatment to restore and maintain sinus rhythm in patients for whom a rhythm control strategy is desired. It is usually offered to patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery (eg, mitral valve repair or replacement, coronary artery bypass grafting, aortic valve surgery, intracardiac defects, ascending aortic surgery). It is also feasible as a stand-alone procedure, bearing a high success rate. In the past few years, less-invasive procedures have been described. AF is a triggered arrhythmia, resulting from ectopic activity most commonly located in and around the pulmonary veins of the left atrium. Therefore, electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins from the rest of the left atrium in order to prevent AF from being triggered is the rationale common to all surgical techniques. Further substrate modification may be required in patients with more persistent AF. This is done by adding ablation of the posterior left atrium with connecting lines of block between pulmonary veins, to the mitral valve annulus, as well as in specific sites in the right atrium. The left atrial appendage is resected or occluded at the same time. Despite patients' high rate of freedom from AF after surgery (70%-85% at 1 year), surgical ablation of AF has never been clearly shown to alter long-term mortality. The available literature supports the recommendation to stop oral anticoagulation therapy 6 months after surgery when sinus rhythm can be documented, because a very low rate of thromboembolic events is reported. However, there is no evidence-based data to support the safety of omitting long-term oral anticoagulation. Thus, surgery should be used primarily as a concomitant procedure during cardiac surgery for other diseased states or as a stand-alone procedure after failure of prior attempts of catheter ablation and antiarrhythmic drugs.
PubMed ID
21329864 View in PubMed
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103 records – page 1 of 11.