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The added burden of comorbidity in patients with asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146851
Source
J Asthma. 2009 Dec;46(10):1021-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Tingting Zhang
Bruce C Carleton
Robert J Prosser
Anne M Smith
Author Affiliation
Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. tingting@popi.ubc.ca
Source
J Asthma. 2009 Dec;46(10):1021-6
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis - epidemiology
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Canada
Comorbidity
Cost of Illness
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Compare the prevalence of comorbidities in adults with and without asthma in Canada and investigate the association between comorbidities in patients with asthma and the occurrence of asthma symptoms or attacks.
Survey data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) were analyzed. A total of 132,221 Canadians participated in the national survey; 10,089 adult respondents from 10 Canadian provinces and 3 territories reported having asthma. Analyses focused on 11 major chronic comorbidities.
Respondents with asthma were more likely to have comorbidities except cancer; 31% of respondents with asthma and comorbidities reported their health status to be fair or poor. For respondents with asthma, non-asthma chronic respiratory disease, mental illness, and allergy were significantly associated with having asthma symptoms or attacks.
Many Canadians with asthma report a high comorbidity burden. These patients will likely require more health services and more complex health management strategies. Comorbid conditions should be clearly identified with particular emphasis on management of mood disorders and anxiety because these conditions are likely to increase asthma symptomatology and may be unrecognized by clinicians.
PubMed ID
19995140 View in PubMed
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Adverse events in ambulatory surgery. A comparison between elderly and younger patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202218
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1999 Apr;46(4):309-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
F. Chung
G. Mezei
D. Tong
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. fchung@torhosp.toronto.on.ca
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1999 Apr;46(4):309-21
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Dizziness - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - epidemiology
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Pain, Postoperative - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
An increasing number of elderly patients are undergoing ambulatory surgery. We examined whether ambulatory surgery carries a higher risk for the elderly than for younger patients.
A total of 17,638 consecutive ambulatory surgical patients were enrolled in a prospective cohort study during a three-year period. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative information was collected. Twenty-seven percent of the enrolled patients were 65 yr or older. Incidence rates of intraoperative and postoperative adverse events among the elderly were compared with those among younger patients; we controlled for sex, ASA physical status, body mass index, type of surgery, and duration of procedure, using multiple logistic regression models.
Elderly patients had a higher incidence of any intraoperative event (adjusted odds ratio, 1.4; 99.7% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-2.0) and of intraoperative cardiovascular events (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0; 99.7% CI, 1.3-3.0). They also had a lower incidence of any postoperative event (adjusted odds ratio, 0.4; 99.7% CI, 0.3-0.6) and of postoperative pain (adjusted odds ratio, 0.2; 99.7% CI, 0.1-0.4), nausea and vomiting (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3; 99.7% CI, 0.1-0.6), and dizziness (adjusted odds ratio, 0.4; 99.7% CI, 0.2-1.0).
The risks reported do not constitute a contraindication for elderly patients to undergo ambulatory surgery but this population may require more careful intraoperative cardiovascular management.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1999 Nov;46(11):109510566936
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1999 Apr;46(4):305-810232712
PubMed ID
10232713 View in PubMed
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Adverse maternal outcomes in multifetal pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177613
Source
BJOG. 2004 Nov;111(11):1294-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Mark C Walker
Kellie E Murphy
Saiyi Pan
Qiuying Yang
Shi Wu Wen
Author Affiliation
OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa General Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Box 241, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8LG.
Source
BJOG. 2004 Nov;111(11):1294-6
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology
Female
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Hematologic Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Maternal mortality
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Multiple
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In this retrospective cohort of 165,188 singleton pregnancies and 44,674 multiple-fetal pregnancies in Canada from 1984 to 2000, we compared the incidence of maternal complications. Multiple gestation pregnancies were associated with significant increases in cardiac morbidity, haematologic morbidity, amniotic fluid embolus, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, postpartum haemorrhage, prolonged hospital stay, the need for obstetric intervention, hysterectomy and blood transfusion. Multiple gestation pregnancies are associated with an increased risk of morbidity for the mother. This should be taken into consideration in antenatal care of these women.
PubMed ID
15521878 View in PubMed
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Age and sex variations in hospital readmissions for COPD associated with overall and cardiac comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152146
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2009 Mar;13(3):394-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Y. Chen
Q. Li
H. Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ychen@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2009 Mar;13(3):394-9
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Pulmonary Heart Disease - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
To determine sex and age variations in hospital readmissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) associated with overall and cardiac comorbid conditions.
A one-year follow-up study was conducted for 108 726 COPD in-patients aged >or=40 years who were discharged alive after their first admission in the 1999-2000 fiscal year.
Within a year, 38 955 of the patients were readmitted to hospital for COPD. The incidence rate of COPD readmission was 49.1% per year. It was higher for men than women aged >or=70 years, but was almost the same for patients aged
PubMed ID
19275803 View in PubMed
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Age at diagnosis of smoking-related disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186128
Source
Health Rep. 2003 Feb;14(2):9-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Jiajian Chen
Author Affiliation
East-West Centre, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
Source
Health Rep. 2003 Feb;14(2):9-19
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Life tables
Male
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
This study assesses the relationship between the age of daily smoking initiation and the age at diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis.
The data are from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). The sample for the analysis consisted of 34,144 respondents aged 35 to 64 living in private households in the provinces and territories.
The life table approach was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of smoking-related disease. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the relative risks of disease by the age when daily smoking began.
For both sexes, the younger the individuals were when they became daily smokers, the sooner they were diagnosed with COPD, heart disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Even when education, household income and number of cigarettes smoked per day were taken into account, adolescent starters were at increased risk of these diseases, compared with never-smokers.
PubMed ID
12658861 View in PubMed
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Alberta northern field work, 1966: rheumatic heart disease in LaCrete and Paddle Prairie.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111294
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Apr 8;96(14):1050-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-8-1967
Author
S. Greenhill
D. Mulholland
D. Mundy
L. Nobert
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Apr 8;96(14):1050-6
Date
Apr-8-1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Ethnology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Religion and Medicine
Rheumatic Heart Disease - epidemiology
Social Conditions
Social Medicine
Abstract
A sociologic and medical study was undertaken of the incidence of rheumatic heart disease in an isolated Mennonite colony in Northern Alberta, Canada. A group of Métis in a nearby settlement was used as a control. A total of 1294 individuals were examined, and evidence of carditis was found in 42 Mennonites.This project is one of a series of student summer research programs sponsored by the Department of Community Medicine, University of Alberta, and supported by grants from the Provincial Department of Health during the past three summers.The students - medical and dental - receive in Edmonton a seven- to 10-day orientation and indoctrination course dealing with the sociological, anthropological and medical problems likely to be met with in the North. Research protocol and methodological techniques are prepared and devised with student participation. A minimum of supervision is given in the field to encourage the undergraduates to adapt and adjust to a changed environment. Student response to this type of learning experience has been most encouraging.
Notes
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1959 May;74(5):431-813658331
PubMed ID
6020554 View in PubMed
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Are there socioeconomic differences in outcomes of coronary revascularizations--a register-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276411
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Dec;25(6):984-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Kristiina Manderbacka
Martti Arffman
Sonja Lumme
Ilmo Keskimäki
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Dec;25(6):984-9
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Earlier studies have reported socioeconomic differences in coronary heart disease incidence and mortality and in coronary treatment, but less is known about outcomes of care. We examined trends in income group differences in outcomes of coronary revascularizations among Finnish residents in 1998-2010.
First revascularizations for 45-84-year-old Finns were extracted from the Hospital Discharge Register in 1998-2009 and followed until 31 December 2010. Income was individually linked to them and adjusted for family size. We examined the risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), coronary mortality and re-revascularization. We calculated age-standardized rates with direct method and Cox regression models.
Altogether 69 076 men and 27 498 women underwent revascularization during the study period. Among men [women] in the 1998 cohort, 41% [35%] suffered MACE during 29 days after the operation and 30% [28%] in the 2009 cohort. Myocardial infarction mortality within 1 year was 2% among both genders in both cohorts. Among men [women] 9% [14%] underwent revascularization within 1 year after the operation in 1998 and 12% [12%] in 2009. Controlling for age, co-morbidities, year, previous infarction and disease severity, an inverse income gradient was found in MACE incidence within 29 days and in coronary mortality. The excess MACE risk was 1.39 and excess mortality risk over 1.70 among both genders in the lowest income quintile. All income group differences remained stable from 1998 to 2010.
In health care, more attention should be paid to prevention of adverse outcomes among persons with low socioeconomic position undergoing revascularization.
PubMed ID
25958240 View in PubMed
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[A retrospective analysis of unfavorable meteorological-magnetic days and of the status of cardiology patients during sanatorium treatment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226780
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1991 Mar-Apr;(2):43-4
Publication Type
Article

The association between carotid intima-media thickness and sciatica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163515
Source
Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Dec;37(3):174-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Rahman Shiri
Eira Viikari-Juntura
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Tapio Vehmas
Helena Varonen
Leena Moilanen
Jaro Karppinen
Markku Heliövaara
Author Affiliation
Musculoskeletal Disorders, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. rahman.shiri@ttl.fi
Source
Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Dec;37(3):174-81
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Sciatica - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Abstract
Both clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown an association between atherosclerotic changes in the aorta or lumbar arteries and lumbar disc degeneration. However, the association between atherosclerosis and sciatica remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between carotid intima-media thickness and sciatica.
The target population consisted of people aged 45 to 74 years, who had participated in a Finnish nationwide population study during the period 2000 to 2001 and lived within 200 km of the 6 study clinics. Of the 1867 eligible subjects, 1386 (74%) were included in the study. We used high-resolution B-mode ultrasound imaging to measure intima-media thickness, and local or radiating low back pain was determined by a standard interview and clinical signs of sciatica through a physician's clinical examination.
Carotid intima-media thickness was associated with continuous radiating low back pain and with a positive unilateral clinical sign of sciatica among men only. After adjustment for potential confounders, each standard deviation (0.23 mm) increment in carotid intima-media thickness showed an odds ratio of 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.3) for continuous radiating low back pain and 1.7 (95% confidence interval 1.3-2.1) for a positive unilateral clinical sign of sciatica. Carotid intima-media thickness was not associated with local low back pain.
Sciatica may be a manifestation of atherosclerosis, or both conditions may share common risk factors.
PubMed ID
17507076 View in PubMed
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200 records – page 1 of 20.