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The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Oct 19;111(8):818-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1974
Author
G R Cumming
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Oct 19;111(8):818-21
Date
Oct-19-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Antistreptolysin - isolation & purification
Arthritis, Juvenile - diagnosis
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Heart Murmurs
Heart Valve Diseases - diagnosis
Humans
Manitoba
Penicillins - drug therapy
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Rheumatic Fever - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control - therapy
Rheumatic Heart Disease - diagnosis
Salicylates - therapeutic use
Streptococcal Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Streptococcus - isolation & purification
Time Factors
Abstract
While rheumatic fever is relatively uncommon except where there are poor and crowded living conditions, sporadic acute attacks continue to occur in a family or pediatric medical practice. The physician's role in management of the sore throat in the diagnosis of suspected cases of rheumatic fever and in follow-up for continued prophylaxis is discussed. The frequency of admissions and presenting features of 159 patients with acute rheumatic fever is reviewed. Continued surveillance is required if we are to achieve a further reduction in attack rate and complications.
Notes
Cites: Br J Exp Pathol. 1967 Dec;48(6):655-614966228
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1969 Apr;84(4):333-94976252
Cites: JAMA. 1969 Nov 3;210(5):862-55394475
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1970 Feb 5;282(6):285-914903632
Cites: Lancet. 1970 May 16;1(7655):1043-54191642
Cites: Clin Exp Immunol. 1970 Aug;7(2):147-594920603
Cites: Circulation. 1973 Jul;48(1):9-184592577
Cites: J Am Med Assoc. 1958 Mar 8;166(10):1113-913513326
Cites: Circulation. 1960 Apr;21:598-61413842843
PubMed ID
4419123 View in PubMed
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Acute rheumatic fever in Swedish children 1971-80.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14621
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Sep;74(5):749-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985
Author
J. Schollin
G. Wesström
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Sep;74(5):749-54
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Myocarditis - epidemiology
Penicillins - therapeutic use
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatic Fever - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Rheumatic Heart Disease - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
Hospital records from all Swedish children 0-15 years old diagnosed as having acute rheumatic fever (ARF) during 1971-80 were studied. Thirty-one children fully met with Jones' modified criterias which gives an incidence of 0.2 cases per 100 000 children and year. Carditis was the most common major manifestation of ARF. In most children the carditis was mild but in three cases there was a persistent cardial affection. 16 of the children received prophylactic antibiotic treatment. No recurrent attacks of ARF were found during the study period.
PubMed ID
4050422 View in PubMed
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Aerobic exercise intensity assessment and prescription in cardiac rehabilitation: a joint position statement of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119409
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Jun;20(3):442-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Alessandro Mezzani
Larry F Hamm
Andrew M Jones
Patrick E McBride
Trine Moholdt
James A Stone
Axel Urhausen
Mark A Williams
Author Affiliation
Salvatore Maugeri Foundation IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Veruno, Exercise Pathophysiology Laboratory, Cardiac Rehabilitation Division, Italy. alessandro.mezzani@fsm.it
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Jun;20(3):442-67
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Europe
Exercise Test - standards
Exercise Therapy - standards
Exercise Tolerance
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Humans
Predictive value of tests
Recovery of Function
Societies, Medical - standards
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Aerobic exercise intensity prescription is a key issue in cardiac rehabilitation, being directly linked to both the amount of improvement in exercise capacity and the risk of adverse events during exercise. This joint position statement aims to provide professionals with up-to-date information regarding the identification of different exercise intensity domains, the methods of direct and indirect determination of exercise intensity for both continuous and interval aerobic training, the effects of the use of different exercise protocols on exercise intensity prescription and the indications for recommended exercise training prescription in specific cardiac patients' groups. The importance of functional evaluation through exercise testing prior to starting an aerobic training program is strongly emphasized, and ramp incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test, when available, is proposed as the gold standard for a physiologically comprehensive exercise intensity assessment and prescription. This may allow a shift from a 'range-based' to a 'threshold-based' aerobic exercise intensity prescription, which, combined with thorough clinical evaluation and exercise-related risk assessment, could maximize the benefits obtainable by the use of aerobic exercise training in cardiac rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
23104970 View in PubMed
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An echocardiographic study comparing male Swedish elite orienteers with other elite endurance athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54551
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1997 Feb 15;79(4):521-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1997
Author
E. Henriksen
J. Landelius
L. Wesslén
T. Kangro
T. Jonason
C. Nyström-Rosander
U. Niklasson
H. Arnell
C. Rolf
E. Hammarström
C. Lidell
I. Ringqvist
G. Friman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Central Hospital, Västeras, Sweden.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1997 Feb 15;79(4):521-4
Date
Feb-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Echocardiography
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality
Heart Ventricles - abnormalities
Humans
Male
Physical Endurance
Sports
Sweden
Abstract
Between 1979 and 1992, there were 16 known cases of sudden unexpected cardiac death among young Swedish orienteers, whose autopsies showed myocarditis to be a common finding. Therefore, 96 elite orienteers and 47 controls underwent echocardiography, showing left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in 9% of the orienteers compared with 4% in the controls.
PubMed ID
9052367 View in PubMed
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[A nonloading pneumocalorimetric method for assessing physical work capacity in cardiopulmonology practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54428
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Sep-Oct;(5):120-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
S F Aharkov
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Sep-Oct;(5):120-3
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calorimetry, Indirect - methods - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Heart diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
A non-loading pneumocalorimetric mode of quantitative assessment of physical performance (PP) has been developed in a series of 25 essentially healthy subjects. Based on the correlation-and-regression analysis a formula for PP was found out to be PP = 59.9 x MCC + 33, were MCC is maximum caloric capacity. PP quantitative assessment was proved to be effective in patients presenting with cardiopulmonary problems.
PubMed ID
9491717 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of acute rheumatic fever in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205720
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1998 Mar 15;24(6):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1998
Author
D. Wong
R. Bortolussi
B. Lang
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, IWK Grace Health Centre, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1998 Mar 15;24(6):45-7
Date
Mar-15-1998
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arthritis, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Incidence
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Rheumatic Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology
Rheumatic Heart Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
PubMed ID
9583241 View in PubMed
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Approach to assessing fitness to drive in patients with cardiac and cognitive conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139320
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Nov;56(11):1123-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Frank J Molnar
Christopher S Simpson
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, 1053 Carling Ave, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4E9. fmolnar@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Nov;56(11):1123-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Automobile Driving
Canada
Checklist
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Medicine
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Male
Mandatory Reporting
Physical Examination
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To help physicians become more comfortable assessing the fitness to drive of patients with complex cardiac and cognitive conditions.
The approach described is based on the authors' clinical practices, recommendations from the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia, and guidelines from the 2003 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference.
When assessing fitness to drive in patients with multiple, complex health problems, physicians should divide conditions that might affect driving into acute intermittent (ie, not usually present on examination) and chronic persistent (ie, always present on examination) medical conditions. Physicians should address acute intermittent conditions first, to allow time for recovery from chronic persistent features that might be reversible. Decisions regarding fitness to drive in acute intermittent disorders are based on probability of recurrence; decisions in chronic persistent disorders are based on functional assessment.
Assessing fitness to drive is challenging at the best of times. When patients have multiple comorbidities, assessment becomes even more difficult. This article provides clinicians with systematic approaches to work through such complex cases.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Feb 6;265(5):622-61987412
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jan 8;320(7227):94-710625265
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2002 Jun;39(6):656-912023711
Cites: Lancet. 1983 Feb 19;1(8321):401-46130388
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1993 Oct;86(10):566-88230056
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Dec;54(12):1809-2417198485
Cites: QJM. 1995 Oct;88(10):733-407493171
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Nov;20(13):1329-3415565196
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2005 Mar;51:372-915794022
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4):295-717132976
Cites: Epilepsia. 1994 May-Jun;35(3):665-78026415
PubMed ID
21075991 View in PubMed
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Assessing cardiac physical examination skills using simulation technology and real patients: a comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159143
Source
Med Educ. 2008 Jun;42(6):628-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Rose Hatala
S Barry Issenberg
Barry Kassen
Gary Cole
C Maria Bacchus
Ross J Scalese
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. rhatala@mac.com
Source
Med Educ. 2008 Jun;42(6):628-36
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiology - education
Clinical Competence - standards
Heart Diseases - diagnosis
Humans
Internship and Residency
Observer Variation
Patient Simulation
Physical Examination - standards
Random Allocation
Abstract
High-stakes assessments of doctors' physical examination skills often employ standardised patients (SPs) who lack physical abnormalities. Simulation technology provides additional opportunities to assess these skills by mimicking physical abnormalities. The current study examined the relationship between internists' cardiac physical examination competence as assessed with simulation technology compared with that assessed with real patients (RPs).
The cardiac physical examination skills and bedside diagnostic accuracy of 28 internists were assessed during an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The OSCE included 3 modalities of cardiac patients: RPs with cardiac abnormalities; SPs combined with computer-based, audio-video simulations of auscultatory abnormalities, and a cardiac patient simulator (CPS) manikin. Four cardiac diagnoses and their associated cardiac findings were matched across modalities. At each station, 2 examiners independently rated a participant's physical examination technique and global clinical competence. Two investigators separately scored diagnostic accuracy.
Inter-rater reliability between examiners for global ratings (GRs) ranged from 0.75-0.78 for the different modalities. Although there was no significant difference between participants' mean GRs for each modality, the correlations between participants' performances on each modality were low to modest: RP versus SP, r = 0.19; RP versus CPS, r = 0.22; SP versus CPS, r = 0.57 (P
PubMed ID
18221269 View in PubMed
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Assessing the relationship between cardiac physical examination technique and accurate bedside diagnosis during an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160805
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Oct;82(10 Suppl):S26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Rose Hatala
S Barry Issenberg
Barry O Kassen
Gary Cole
C Maria Bacchus
Ross J Scalese
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, 1081 Burrard St., Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6Z 1Y6. rhatala@mac.com
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Oct;82(10 Suppl):S26-9
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cardiology - education
Clinical Competence
Heart Diseases - diagnosis
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods
Physical Examination - methods
Point-of-Care Systems - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Schools, Medical
Abstract
Many standardized patient (SP) encounters employ SPs without physical findings and, thus, assess physical examination technique. The relationship between technique, accurate bedside diagnosis, and global competence in physical examination remains unclear.
Twenty-eight internists undertook a cardiac physical examination objective structured clinical examination, using three modalities: real cardiac patients (RP), "normal" SPs combined with related cardiac audio-video simulations, and a cardiology patient simulator (CPS). Two examiners assessed physical examination technique and global bedside competence. Accuracy of cardiac diagnosis was scored separately.
The correlation coefficients between participants' physical examination technique and diagnostic accuracy were 0.39 for RP (P
PubMed ID
17895683 View in PubMed
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160 records – page 1 of 16.